Sea Bass

Jun 5th, 2002, 10:40 AM
  #1  
xxx
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Sea Bass

Everyone seems to be plugging the sea bass meal at the Reef Grill in Cayman. Maybe its time to pick another item on the menu before we lose another species...

http://www.usatoday.com/news/healthscience/science/cold-science/2002-02-19-toothfish.htm

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/05/0522_020522_seabass.html
 
Jun 5th, 2002, 11:43 AM
  #2  
Fred
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Very interesting articles.

If you read them thouroghly, it certainly seems as if many of the boycotts are simply a "feel good" mission, that will have virtually no effect. The only way to stop the possibility of extinction, is to stop the illegal fishing for this species. The only way to do that is to get several governments involved. With all that going on in the world right now, this unfortunately isn't going to make the priority list. I love Sea-bass, and would boycott if I thought it would make a difference, but a handful of restaurants boycotting a certain fish is a small bandaid on a huge cut.
 
Jun 5th, 2002, 12:19 PM
  #3  
Tim
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Some restaurants have stopped selling swordfish for the same reason. Fish farming (aquaculture) produces a lot of seafood nowadays, and I heard that Cayman now has a fish farm. As for the Reef Grill's signature Sea Bass dish, I'm not sure why there are so many rave reviews for it, it was good and very fresh, but when I'm in the Caribbean I look for the local catch that I can't easily find in the States.
 
Jun 5th, 2002, 12:36 PM
  #4  
Scott
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Tim,
The reason for the "rave reviews" is because the Sea-Bass at the Reef Grill is (THAT) good. I'm from New England (Boston) and do no what good seafood is all about. I must say that the Sea-Bass they serve there is one of the best fish dishes I have had the pleasure to experience. I do agree with you as far as trying the local fare, but this is one meal that's so good, you are missing the boat if you don't try it.

The articles provided by the original poster are quite intriging, but I half to side with Fred on this one. I just can't see the cause being helped by a small handful of people refusing to serve or eat this great fish. I guess one can only hope that the illegal taking of this species doesn't kill off this wonderful fish.
 
Jun 5th, 2002, 12:59 PM
  #5  
Tim
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Scott, I did have it, I said it was good and very fresh. But to me, it was overrated. Seafood is my favorite, and I've had better fish dishes at many restaurants on Cayman and all over the Caribbean (just my opinion). I recently had a fish soup at Cafe Med that was incredible. And the local catch was snapper at Lone Star, and I would take that over the Reef Grill dish any day. I did like Reef Grill's calamari a lot. What did you think of Cayman style fish?
 
Jun 5th, 2002, 08:35 PM
  #6  
xxx
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Here's a cool web site that tells which seafood is recommended and which to avoid from an environmental perspective. For example, Chilean Sea Bass is to be avoided but Dolphinfish (mahimahi) is ok because it grows and reproduces so fast it isnt as susceptible to overfishing

www.seafoodchoices.com/seasense/chilean_sea_bass.shtml

www.seafoodchoices.com/seasense/dolphinfish.shtml

Checkout the list of fish on the right of the web page there are interesting facts like dolphinfish is called mahimahi which means strongstrong in hawaiian.
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 04:49 AM
  #7  
Scott
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Tim,
You are right, it really is a matter of opinion. I really am not a big fan of the "Cayman Style" fish, as I prefer a spicy or blackened style over the peppers, onions, and tomato sauce. My favorite local fish for Grand Cayman would be either Mahi Mahi or Wahoo. I have also had some decent grouper there, but prefer a lighter taste. The way that the Reef Grill prepares their Sea-Bass is delicious in my opinion, and gets many thumbs up from many who have tried it. It is very rare to hear from anyone that has anything but good things to say, I guess your comment caught me off guard, as it was the first time someone (wasn't) impressed with this meal. I guess this world would be a boring place if we all loved the same things....
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 07:35 AM
  #8  
Nancy
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Thanks xxx, for the info. I had been trying to find a site like this for awhile and didn't know where to look.
It's sad that people find out about a situation and think "it's not going to change if just a handful of people don't eat something."
I feel that attitude is ignorant. Obviously, every little bit helps, and each person who knows can educate others.
I'm a diver who sees firsthand over the years the lack of presence of formerly bountiful fish on my dives.
What does it hurt to pick something else off a menu or off a grocery shelf?
If people don't get a clue, they won't be available much longer to choose from...
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 08:55 AM
  #9  
anon
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I got an idea. The vendors could just stop selling them. If they really cared about their island and environment as much as most of them claim to, they should be more than happy to do so.
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 09:35 AM
  #10  
xxx
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but i like chilean sea bass
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 09:50 AM
  #11  
xyz
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Sucks to be you doesn't it.
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 10:09 AM
  #12  
spare me
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Nancy,

So just because some people don't share your views you label them as ignorant? You are apparently more clueless than you sound. If I were you, I'd consider re-reading the articles, and comparing them to some of the above posts that you deemed the author ignorant. The article CLEARLY defines the root of the problem to be with the illegal harvesting of these fish. So don't call people ignorant because they happen to truely understand a certain problem, and don't wish to jump on your god damned 'feel good about yourself boycott'!! You sound like a very judgemental, shallow snobby bitch.
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 10:24 AM
  #13  
Nancy
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Spare me,
Ignorant - synonyms: uninformed, unaware, badly informed.
As in, someone who is not aware that their actions may cause harm, or as in someone who is stupid enough to resort to childish name-calling and curses on an anonymous board.
The problem is, if people eat it, they will harvest it - duh!

 
Jun 6th, 2002, 11:23 AM
  #14  
Wrong Again
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Nancy,

If people didn't buy/supply it, there would be no reason to harvest it. So where do you really think the problem lies? Duh!!
 
Jun 6th, 2002, 12:38 PM
  #15  
Tim
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A lot of people boycotted tuna back when they heard dolphins were killed during fishing. Then the fisherman changed their methods and you started seeing tuna cans with the "dolphin safe" label on the can. Goes to show how the consumers drive the market.... I saw a show where they have now learned to farm one kind of tuna, apparently it took years since they wouldn't breed well in captivity.
 

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