Keeping/staying warm - hand warmers?

Oct 29th, 2002, 12:24 PM
  #1  
Simon
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Keeping/staying warm - hand warmers?

I am going to be traveling from US to Montreal at the beginning of December. I looked around on the web and saw these solid fuel type hand warmers (red velvet container with a piece of burning charcoal inside). I am wondering if anyone have brought these onto the plane (in checked luggage)? I don't know whether there are restrictions, but when I called Air Canada (the carrier I will be flying on) they didn't know what I was talking about and could not direct me to the appropriate personnel. I am wondering if it's safer just to bring the chemical type warmers?
 
Oct 29th, 2002, 01:29 PM
  #2  
Susan
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Is this real? Why wouldn't you just wear gloves? We're not talking the Arctic here. I think it's unlikely that you'd need to go to extreme measures to keep warm.
 
Oct 29th, 2002, 04:12 PM
  #3  
simple
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Simon,
Invest in a pair of leather gloves with cashmere lining. Or those Thinsulate lined gloves. Simple.
 
Oct 29th, 2002, 07:37 PM
  #4  
Bonnie
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I always had the hand and foot warmers for my kids when they skiied. I have never used them for myself. Usually gloves are enough for getting around the city. You can buy them at most sporting goods stores.
 
Oct 30th, 2002, 12:42 AM
  #5  
Robyn
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I find a hot coffee or tea does wonders for warming the hands on a cold day...
 
Oct 30th, 2002, 04:11 PM
  #6  
dave
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Robyn,
Itried your coffee/tea recomendation and severly burned my fingers. Maybe I should've used iced coffeee/tea.
 
Oct 31st, 2002, 04:18 AM
  #7  
xxx
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Why would anyone want to put their hands into a device that containsa burning piece of charcoal?
 
Oct 31st, 2002, 08:41 AM
  #8  
Faina
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xxx, maybe people with arthritis or other bone disease?
 
Oct 31st, 2002, 07:01 PM
  #9  
icithecat
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A much better idea would be a pair of ski gloves. There is skiing in the US I believe? I think I remember them trying in Utah.
Alternatly a propane torch with two or three spare cylinders would work.
 
Nov 1st, 2002, 03:34 AM
  #10  
erin
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Well I hope Simon doesn't think all Canadians are this sarcastic. I remember the handwarmers you describe but if you go to a sporting store you can find newer versions that don't contain charcoal.They're like little ice packs, only when you snap them they give off heat instead of cold. I don't know what you plan in doing in Montreal but in early December you may find good gloves are enough to keep your hands warm.If not you can buy handwarmers easily enough in Canada. I hope you enjoy your visit.
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 12:19 PM
  #11  
Simon
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I just want to say thanks to everyone for the info and A LOT of good laugh. (To my defense I'm from Houston, TX which is almost 70 F today...what do I know? I'll listen to everyone's advise and will do the glove/hot coffee/chemical warmer combo.
 
Nov 13th, 2002, 07:13 AM
  #12  
respond
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Faina,

I would think the risks of being burned by a piece of burning charcoal would far outweigh any benefits that a person suffering from a bone disease or arthritis would receive.
 
Nov 13th, 2002, 07:24 AM
  #13  
kate
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Simon, we just returned from a visit to Montreal and I got great gloves at a very low price in a store called Simons! So I think you should give your namesake store a visit when you arrive and get something warm for your hands.
Enjoy your trip, Montreal and Montrealers are great!
 
Nov 14th, 2002, 09:45 AM
  #14  
Brian
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No Simon, thank YOU for the great laugh!
No offence intended of course. Just funny to picutre an American dressed up in 50 layers and huge coal burning gloves walking the streets of Montreal!
Actually, I think most of us ARE sarcastic... but not in a bad way, just get used to our humour,I don't think anyone means to insult.
 
Nov 14th, 2002, 10:00 AM
  #15  
Pat
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A very good thing about Montreal in the winter is that you never have to go outdoors. There is an entire network of tunnels and subways that just about link the entire city. Plan on that and pack light. Just avoid doorways.
 

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