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Aussie teacher looking for work in Canada

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Oct 14th, 2002, 03:46 PM
  #1
Kimberley
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Aussie teacher looking for work in Canada

Hi,
I am a 24 year old Australian teacher for Kindergarten - grade 6. I am qualified to teach at both public and Catholic schools. I am looking at getting a working visa for Aug-September 2003 in a k-6 school in Canada. I don't know much about Canada (that's why I would like to go). I was thinking about heading to Vancouver, does anyone know how I might apply for work in schools? Which areas are nice to stay, reasonably cheap and near transport so I can travel to work? Any information would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 08:02 PM
  #2
gary
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Check with your local Canadian Consulate. Teachers in Public Schools are unionized and it's likely difficult to break in even if you get a work visa. However private schools abound and are not subject to union restrictions and if you do get a work visa that's where you should be looking. The chances of being able to pick and choose preferred locations are frankly pushing it but the fact is that most of the best private schools are in neighbourhoods that are anything but cheap and are not always located well for public transport. I suppose there are web sites to search the possibilities but I don't know them. So my original advice stands. Go to or get in touch with your local Canadian Consulate - unless you're from Canberra in which case get in touch with the Embassy.
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 08:07 PM
  #3
darlene
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I teach in Vancouver and would recommend you look for work outside B.C. There have been hundreds of layoffs the schools are underfunded, the job is becoming very miserable do to low morale. The class sizes are no longer restricted and the help for special needs students has been cut back drastically. I am in the position of loosing my job next year (I've been teaching for several years).
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 10:13 PM
  #4
Kimberley
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Darlene,
Is this the case for all of Canada or just B.C? Do you have any suggestions as to which state/province may be in a better situatation mid to late next year?
Hope you work things out with your job.
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 10:38 PM
  #5
Robyn
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I know (as a university student in Vancouver *and* as a daughter of a high school teacher who's been teaching since the early 70's)... this is the situation in the province of BC. While it's a bit more complex, it has to do with a provincial government cutting back education.

However, I'm not sure if the local private schools would be taken into account, since they are privately funded.

I do know that qualifications for teaching in Canada vary per province/territory. Someone who is trained in BC might not have the qualifications to teach in, say, Nova Scotia. I don't know the details of this, but the first thing you should find out is whether or not you qualify to teach in BC. Of course, this may only apply for public schools, not private schools.

My Dad did a teaching exchange back in 98 where he went to Adelaide, and an Adelaide family came to Vancouver to teach in his place. That's probably your best option, although, honestly, I haven't really looked this up yet, so I can't say for sure.

Here's a few website that might help you get started:

Ministry of Education:
http://www.gov.bc.ca/bced

Ministry of Advanced Education:
http://www.gov.bc.ca/aved

BC Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils:
http://www.bccpac.bc.ca/

Education Canada:
http://educationcanada.com/
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 10:39 PM
  #6
Robyn
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Oops... minor detail, but the teaching exchange took place in "78" - not 98.
 
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Oct 14th, 2002, 11:52 PM
  #7
Kimberley
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I chose B.C because I have no French skills at all and I am not sure of other places in Canada which are mainly English speaking rather than French. Can anyone suggest other places where I may have more luck with teaching without needing french. Your help has been greatly appreciated so far. Thanks guys!
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 12:50 PM
  #8
curiousx
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I second the advice to look at teaching in the private school system. Have a look, for example, at the website for Elmwood School in Ottawa (JK-13). Has a very civilized reputation.

Though located in the ritzy Rockcliffe neighbourhood, there is lots of lower priced accommodation in near-by Vanier. The teachers' backgrounds are varied and international, and so are the students' since many are the children of diplomats posted to the City. Ottawa is an extremely livable city (with the exception of February). Worth a peek anyway.
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 01:46 PM
  #9
Robyn
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Hmmmm...

You might want to research a bit on Canada before you decide teaching in Canada! But nevertheless, Quebec is the French-speaking province. New Brunswick is really the only bilingual province where the chance of you meeting someone who speaks French and/or English is the same. Parts of Ontario, such as Ottawa, or any place close to the Quebec border will have large French-speaking communities. Elsewhere? English is what you'll be speaking.

But even then, it really has nothing to do with where you'll be, it'll depend on the school where you teach. If you don't speak French, don't teach at a French/French Immersion school, or don't become a French teacher. It's as simple as that.
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 06:39 PM
  #10
Kimberley
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I am trying to research Canada by asking people on this forum, by searching dozens of sites, emailing schools and people in Canada asking for advice.
That's exactly why I want to travel the world, not just Canada, learn about it and its people first hand and return to my students here with a broad range of personal experience to share with them. Hopefully, teachers of the future will be able to impart to their students global education in an attempt for greater knowledge and understanding between different races, cultures, religions etc."
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 07:17 PM
  #11
Robyn
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Oops... I should have added a little smiley face "" after what I wrote... as after I re-read it, I realised it sounded a bit snotty - not my intention at all! I meant, well, there should be a website or two out there that will give you some basic Canadian history/geography/culture, just so you're not going into job-hunting blindly! (Not that you are though!)

You might want to give Virtual Tourist a quick check. It's an interactive traveller's site where people from all over the world post their pictures/travelogues/advice. It definitely gives you a first-hand account of different cultures.

http://www.virtualtourist.com

They also have a Canadian travel forum that you can ask similar questions to:

http://www.virtualtourist.com/f/530/

And if you want to look at a few pages on Canada that some of the Virtual Tourist members have built, the URL is:

http://www.virtualtourist.com/vt/530/

Hope this helps!
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 07:53 PM
  #12
Kimberley
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I am trying to research Canada by asking people on this forum, by searching dozens of sites, emailing schools and people in Canada asking for advice.
That's exactly why I want to travel the world, not just Canada, learn about it and its people first hand and return to my students here with a broad range of personal experience to share with them. Hopefully, teachers of the future will be able to impart to their students global education in an attempt for greater knowledge and understanding between different races, cultures, religions etc."
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 07:58 PM
  #13
Kimberley
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Thanks Robyn, yu have been really helpful. Not sure why message was posted twice last time. (Weird)
I will have a look at the sites you mentioned. I also thought of contacting indiviaual Catholic schools to see if they can give me any advice or information.
 
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Oct 15th, 2002, 09:25 PM
  #14
Gil
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Kimberley,
If you're interested in teaching in a catholic school, Ontario's education system has been divided into both public and catholic school boards, not to mention french boards and private schools. I am not sure if other provinces have their education system set up like this. The biggest difference aside from religious affiliation is that public school is generally divided into elementary k-5, junior high 6-8 and senior high 9-12; whereas the catholic boards simply run elementary from k-8.

I know in Nwefoundland they recently merged the two systems as a cost-cutting measure. From my travels in BC, it looks like catholic schools fall under "private". In some areas of Alberta "public" means Catholic and "separate" means Public/non-catholic so do some more investigating.

For more information on the Ontario education system, check out www.edu.gov.on.ca To find out about other provinces/territories type in the province/territory and ministry of education into a search engine.

There are several Australian exchange students at my university and the biggest deal for them was celebrating their first Thanksgiving on Monday. They had to explain (several times) that for different circumstances, Australia doesn't celebrate Thanksgiving. Perhaps you could share that particular cultural aspect.

Well, hope this helps!
 
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