China in February ... too cold??

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Aug 7th, 2002, 01:34 AM
  #1
MaryHW
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China in February ... too cold??

I'm planning my trip to China (Beijing, Xi'an, Shanghai ... forthe moment) in February. I know it's going to be cold, but I would like to know if it will be too cold and won't be able to enjoy my visit and sightseeing.

Also I'm plannig to stay in budget accommodation ... will I die of coldness during the nights?? Do they have good heating systems in the rooms??

Thank you for yuor help
-Mary
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 03:00 AM
  #2
Charlie
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Don't know how much difference a month makes but I was in Beijing for the first week of March/2002 and the weather was great.The temp. was in the mid sixties and the day I visited the Wall reached the seventies and I had to shed clothing during my hike.
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 06:35 AM
  #3
Barry
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Hi Mary,

To ask if China is cold in february is like asking if US is cold in february. In fact, China is larger than US. Hinan is hot/warm and beautiful in february if you're afraid of the cold. It can be quite cold in Beijing if it's windy. Trust me, you won't die of coldness in your room. In general, hotels in China are much better in value than hotels in US. In other words, for the same price you'll most likely find BETTER rooms than you would in US.
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 07:16 AM
  #4
Peter N-H
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It's not on the topic of the original query, but the sunny comments above on Chinese hotels don't quite match the reality.

Sino-foreign joint-venture hotels in urban areas in China--the only ones worth taking seriously--are demanding developed nation rates, and while these can be bargained down substantially in many cases for much of the year, the service received never quite matches, and sometimes comes no where near matching, that received in the same brand of hotel at home in the same price range.

Four- and five-star Chinese-run hotels like to charge similar rates, but usually operate as a vague, if sometimes very entertaining, imitation of developed nation standards. To qualify for four-star status a hotel must satisfy a list of requirements at provincial level, and for five-star status a list set by authorities in Beijing. Thus in some area four-star status can be achieved only with the additional of a bowling alley; in others a swimming pool. This doesn't mean that once the alley breaks down it will be fixed, or that the pool doesn't have more rings than a sequoia. One 'five-star' hotel in Beijing has gone nearly a decade without redecorating its rooms. The star system in China is largely meaningless, since stars are almost never lost. Thus, 'I got a five-star room for only US$60' often isn't much of a claim.

At the US$15-30 range, while there are newer hotels which do offer good facilities for the price (usually asking a lot more than this to start with--you much bargain), it's rare for everything in the rooms to work, or for service to be consistent. These days it's usually trying to please, but isn't entirely sure how.

And after three months or so, rooms already look tired; after a year they look battered. Older hotels, asking the same prices, may have carpets which are 25% cigarette burns and 25% mucus, lights which don't work, and a leaking bathroom with a partly fallen ceiling from earlier leaks above.

It's hard to say that such hotels represent good value, but in some towns they are the only choice you have.

Basic rule: the newest hotel is always the best, and often the cheapest. And a new three-star is often considerably better than an old four-star, or even an old five-star. New hotels, in fact, can be very good value. But in general the situation is far more complicated than is being suggested above.

Peter N-H
http://members.axion.net/~pnh/China.html

 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 09:35 AM
  #5
Barry
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What Peter said is very true especially the part that you should always try to find the newest hotels. But the bottom line is that I rarely pay more than US100 per day for a very decent room in any cities in China. I wish I could say the same for hotels in US.
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 09:50 AM
  #6
Barry
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What Peter said is very true especially the part that you should always try to find the newest hotels. But the bottom line is that I rarely pay more than US100 per day for a very decent room in any cities in China. I wish I could say the same for hotels in US.
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 12:11 PM
  #7
Natalie
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I have been in the Beijing area of China during February -- and it is VERY cold. The wind from the Northwest is killer. However, if you are able to brave the cold, it is the best time to visit sites because it's not peak season for tourists. This is a big deal because China is very crowded already. Also I visited the summer palace in Beijing and it is absolutely gorgeous in the winter. As for heating, it depends where you stay, but I stayed in a hostel that was new and the heating was great! I also stayed in a mid range hotel another time and the heating was awful. I'm sure if you stay in a nice hotel you will be fine, but be prepared to not always expect all of the conveniences of home at all times.
 
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Aug 7th, 2002, 12:48 PM
  #8
Patty
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What's too cold really depends on what you're used to and where you're coming from. I've been to Beijing in December/January and it was comfortable to me. I also went to Harbin that same trip and it took me about a day to acclimate to the temperature there (enough to want to go outside) where it was -20C. But after I acclimated it was fine and I had fun sightseeing even at night.
 
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