Safari packing list

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Mar 13th, 2018, 12:33 PM
  #1
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Safari packing list

I've gotten a few PMs about my safari packing list. So I took this snowy day as a chance to get it down on paper. Other safari veterans may have different approaches, but this is mine. I've managed to pare it down to go carry-on only on the last 3 safaris. Feel free to add to this thread as you see fit! I think this will be useful for folks new to safari.

Clothes
Convertible pants - quick dry fabric to speed up laundry return at camps (I take just about half as many the number of days I’m on safari, so 10 day safari = 3 or 4 pairs, and I use laundry at camps)
Long/short sleeved shirts - quick dry (ditto the above on #)
Sports bras for ladies (believe me, you’ll thank me, bouncy vehicles on unpaved roads!)
Undergarments (take at least as many as you have days on safari, camps will not launder undergarments)
Socks (take old ones…when you stand on the seats to look out the roof of the vehicle, they’ll get filthy)
Sturdy shoes – I wear Brooks trail sneakers
Flip flops/Tevas/sandals for camp
Hat with wide brim
Fleece coat for early mornings
Rain coat if rainy season
Sleepwear
Bathing suit (if accommodation has pool)

Personal Health Items and First Aid
Toothbrush/paste
Shampoo/soap/lotions (some camps provide them, but not all do)
Sunblock
Lip balm with SPF
Deodorant
Brush/comb
Razor
Anti-malarial meds
Insect repellant (I use Repel Sportsman Insect repellant stick, which is TSA liquid restriction friendly and you don't have to apply with your hands)

Cipro/anti-diarrheal
Cortisone or other anti-itch cream
Band-aids
Routine prescriptions
Pedialyte powder sticks (I carry this with me everywhere I travel to replenish quickly, especially going to some place hot)
Ibuprofen/other pain meds
Feminine hygiene products (even if you’re not expecting it, trust me there is NO WHERE to buy them in the bush!!)
Cold medication (I always take a sinus decongestant, just in case I get sick while there. Again, there’s no where to just pop in and buy it once you’re in the bush)
Antibacterial hand gel or wipes for post-bush bathroom break


Camera
Camera
Memory cards

Batteries
Battery charger
Lens cloth
Pillowcase to cover camera while driving on game drives
Plug converter for camera, mobile phone, etc

Miscellany
Wildlife identification book - this is mine: https://www.amazon.com/Wildlife-Africa-Princeton-Pocket-Guides/dp/0691007373/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520965830&sr=8-1&keywords=martin+withers
Notebook to track sightings (I match special sightings, facts or stories to the image # on the camera, you’ll be surprised how much you forget before you get home)
Binoculars
Toilet paper rolls (buy travel sized rolls or save the ends of your rolls at home)
Paper bags to dispose of bush bathroom break toilet paper
Flashlight or head lamp (I prefer the headlamp when searching in my bag in the dark)
Sunglasses
Granola bars, nuts or similar that doesn’t melt (for that time between dawn and bush breakfast!)
Book/Kindle/iPad

For gorilla trekking only:
Hiking shoes -- you'll definitely want something more than sneakers, water and mud proof too
High socks to tuck pants into
Gloves
Gaiters
Rain pants
Rain coat
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Mar 13th, 2018, 05:08 PM
  #2
 
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Thanks amy. I'm going on my first safari in August, to Tanzania, and that packing list will help.
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Mar 19th, 2018, 08:58 AM
  #3
 
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saline spray is needed if going in dry season (june/july) in Kenya, as are eye drops.
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Mar 20th, 2018, 02:35 AM
  #4
 
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Oh my! Thanks for this!
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Nov 9th, 2018, 06:53 AM
  #5
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
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So great - thanks! I'm a good light packer and travel 2-3 times/year in Central America so much of your list looks familiar.

I have a color question, though. I've done my due diligence using forums, guidebooks, and google images. I get khaki/tan/light olive but sometimes sites say 'light green' and a lot of my favorite travel clothes are light green/teal - it's my main color palette for travel. Wondering if you folks could take a look at this image and tell me which of these colors would work. I would love not to feel the need to buy new clothes aside from a fleece in a neutral color (I currently have dark and bright only).

Please and thanks!
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Nov 11th, 2018, 03:46 AM
  #6
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Hi hopefulist...you’ll be fine. I’m just back from the Mara en route to the US and while there are a fair amount of people who stick to neutral/beige there are still some who wear very brights. I’d stay away from camouflage and maybe blue (tse tse flies are making a comeback here and blue attracts them). Your colors will be fine.
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Nov 11th, 2018, 06:28 PM
  #7
 
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Gorilla trekking gear questions, some of which may be stupid:

Are hiking shoes OK, or should I get hiking boots? When I tried boots on, I found them very uncomfortable around the ankles.

If I want to use hiking poles, do they have any there, or do I need to bring my own?

Do they/can they provide water in bottles, or do I need to bring a bottle from home to fill?

Do I need to bring my own snacks from home, or are there things I can buy there?

Also, a non-gorilla question that women travelers will probably understand, for Kenyan safari and Uganda gorilla trek:

Do most places have hair conditioner, or do I need to bring a supply for the duration?
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Nov 12th, 2018, 05:45 AM
  #8
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Arts, I can only speak for the experience in Rwanda, ymmv.

The rangers and porters had walking sticks you could borrow for free, one or two.

I wore hiking boots that were ankle length. They weren’t comfortable for the rest of my safari but liked the stability of them for our three treks.

Your lodge should give you water, some will give you a reusable bottle others will just give you the bottle the water comes in, varies lodge to lodge. As does the availability of toiletries. I’ve been in some that have shampoo, conditioner, lotion, soap, others have nothing or only shampoo.

i always bring my own snacks for safari and on gorilla treks I wanted something I knew my stomach could handle and not whatever might be available.

Hope this helps! It’s an awesome experience!
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Nov 12th, 2018, 08:24 AM
  #9
 
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All very helpful - thanks!
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Nov 12th, 2018, 09:09 AM
  #10
 
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Thanks!

If anyone knows about the hiking-poles-in-Uganda question, I'd love to know. Hoping I don't have to spend some of my precious weight allowance on them!
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Nov 12th, 2018, 10:16 AM
  #11
 
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Guides offer you trekking poles (aka natural bamboo)at a small price soon after the briefing and the zone assigned to you. I found it more than enough. Make sure you have a comfortable pair of gloves. This is more important than the pole itself.
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Nov 12th, 2018, 10:31 AM
  #12
 
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Safari ants are an issue. These a large red bloody creatures with sizeable madables,with a knack of sneaking into the trousers as you sneak up to the gorillas.So the a thick pair of socks which can accommodate the end of your trousers are required. My canvas jacket prevented the thorny undergrowth tearing into the flesh. Take plenty of water/fluids. The humidity is high and perspiration saps you.

Need to know more about Uganda and the incredible primates click on my name and look for TR , 'An Ugandan Urge- Gorillas in the midst '
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Nov 12th, 2018, 08:55 PM
  #13
 
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Thanks, inquest.

For inquest or others, this may be a dumb question, but what kind of gloves are recommended? Does anyone have a link to something appropriate?

Also, something I saw said to wear heavy pants, for example jeans - really?
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Nov 13th, 2018, 12:50 AM
  #14
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
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I took a pair of gardening gloves and it worked perfectly well. As you trudge through the rainforest you are forced to grapple vines and tree , many are thorny. This serves to protect your palms.
The terrain is undulating often slushy and slippery. The stretchable denim trousers .
Canvas too would do fine. Any type which wouldn't hinder progress in thick bush would be fine. I wore some kind of synthetic tracks, which also was waterproof.
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Nov 19th, 2018, 07:27 PM
  #15
 
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Originally Posted by amyb View Post
I've gotten a few PMs about my safari packing list. So I took this snowy day as a chance to get it down on paper. Other safari veterans may have different approaches, but this is mine. I've managed to pare it down to go carry-on only on the last 3 safaris. Feel free to add to this thread as you see fit! I think this will be useful for folks new to safari.

Clothes
Convertible pants - quick dry fabric to speed up laundry return at camps (I take just about half as many the number of days I’m on safari, so 10 day safari = 3 or 4 pairs, and I use laundry at camps)
Long/short sleeved shirts - quick dry (ditto the above on #)
Sports bras for ladies (believe me, you’ll thank me, bouncy vehicles on unpaved roads!)
Undergarments (take at least as many as you have days on safari, camps will not launder undergarments)
Socks (take old ones…when you stand on the seats to look out the roof of the vehicle, they’ll get filthy)
Sturdy shoes – I wear Brooks trail sneakers
Flip flops/Tevas/sandals for camp
Hat with wide brim
Fleece coat for early mornings
Rain coat if rainy season
Sleepwear
Bathing suit (if accommodation has pool)

Personal Health Items and First Aid
Toothbrush/paste
Shampoo/soap/lotions (some camps provide them, but not all do)
Sunblock
Lip balm with SPF
Deodorant
Brush/comb
Razor
Anti-malarial meds
Insect repellant (I use Repel Sportsman Insect repellant stick, which is TSA liquid restriction friendly and you don't have to apply with your hands)

Cipro/anti-diarrheal
Cortisone or other anti-itch cream
Band-aids
Routine prescriptions
Pedialyte powder sticks (I carry this with me everywhere I travel to replenish quickly, especially going to some place hot)
Ibuprofen/other pain meds
Feminine hygiene products (even if you’re not expecting it, trust me there is NO WHERE to buy them in the bush!!)
Cold medication (I always take a sinus decongestant, just in case I get sick while there. Again, there’s no where to just pop in and buy it once you’re in the bush)
Antibacterial hand gel or wipes for post-bush bathroom break


Camera
Camera
Memory cards

Batteries
Battery charger
Lens cloth
Pillowcase to cover camera while driving on game drives
Plug converter for camera, mobile phone, etc

Miscellany
Wildlife identification book - this is mine: https://www.amazon.com/Wildlife-Africa-Princeton-Pocket-Guides/dp/0691007373/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520965830&sr=8-1&keywords=martin+withers
Notebook to track sightings (I match special sightings, facts or stories to the image # on the camera, you’ll be surprised how much you forget before you get home)
Binoculars
Toilet paper rolls (buy travel sized rolls or save the ends of your rolls at home)
Paper bags to dispose of bush bathroom break toilet paper
Flashlight or head lamp (I prefer the headlamp when searching in my bag in the dark)
Sunglasses
Granola bars, nuts or similar that doesn’t melt (for that time between dawn and bush breakfast!)
Book/Kindle/iPad

For gorilla trekking only:
Hiking shoes -- you'll definitely want something more than sneakers, water and mud proof too
High socks to tuck pants into
Gloves
Gaiters
Rain pants
Rain coat
Glad you mentioned everything here.
should read this and get some knowledge .
night safari is one of the best Night out option with family and friends.I have been in Dubai last year and i would strongly recommend night safari trip. enjoying is the life is very important nobody has seen the Future...so live life King size.
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