hepatitus,typhoid and polio

Old Nov 21st, 2006, 09:10 PM
  #1  
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hepatitus,typhoid and polio

We are leaving for Kruger, Botswana and Victoria falls in 3 weeks. Is it necessary to have any inocculations or will taking malaria pills be enough??What has your experience been? Our doctors are saying that we need protection from the 3 mentioned in the title of my post. Are they being overly cautious?
Thank you
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Old Nov 21st, 2006, 09:31 PM
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On Nov. 29, we are leaving for tanzania (OAT tour to Arusha, Ngorongoro Crater, Serengeti, and Tarangire) and were also concerned about inocculations. A year ago, we traveled to China and had Tetanus and Hepatitis shots, with a follow-up hepatitis booster. We also took the typhoid medicine. So, this time, we had no shots...but will be taking malarone. I had asked our doctor about polio and he didn't think it was necessary, although i know that some infectious disease specialists might disagree. I appreciated reading your questions and will be interested in your responses. Have a great trip!
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Old Nov 21st, 2006, 09:50 PM
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you should follow your doctors advice. i got all three for my first trip, they're all good for many years (polio for life if it's your adult booster shot) why risk it?
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Old Nov 21st, 2006, 09:59 PM
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santharamhari
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About anti-malarials....i dont take them for my trips to Botswana or SA.

Hari
 
Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 04:09 AM
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The best thing to do is to consult the CDC website of the US government. They have the most up to date information on what meds and innocultaions are necessary for where you are going. At the very minimum you should take anti-malarial meds.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 05:22 AM
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Or see a specialized travel doc. who will be more up to date than a GP. Only your doc. can review your history and rec. accordingly.
Also, don't know where you live but polio, hepatitus, thypoid are now found in many countries including the US - so most of these innocs. are good for future insurance everywwhere.
Enjoy your trip!
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:06 AM
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I agree with cybor. I use a travel clinic too, not just my regular docot. I had the 3 shots you mention.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:07 AM
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Actually I did the typhoid orally which lasts longer than the injection.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:33 AM
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sandi
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Better safe than sorry.
Malaria is nasty if you get this and often it isn't detected for sometime.
So malaria meds are a serious consideration.

The others, will serve you well at home and for minimum 10/years, polio if your adult booster, for life. And don't forget Tetanus, also good for 10/years.

The CDC site is good, though somewhat alarmist, print out the info and discuss with a tropical med doc preferrably, but providing your entire health history. General docs, often, don't have enough experience, but you never know. Go fully prepared to your medical practioner.
 
Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 06:44 AM
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Another consideration about taking your malaria meds. is that if you live in an area where malaria isn't prolific you may get misdiagnosed months later. Malaria can remain dormant for quite awhile. The consequences can be pretty dire if left untreated.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:07 AM
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I'd check the CDC site, but also see a travel doc RIGHT AWAY -- it takes some weeks for innoculations to take effect. I think that most travel docs will make an effort to help you schedule an appt asap if you have an upcoming trip.

The CDC site lists everything under the sun -- a good travel doc can help you sort out what is really relevant for you.

Also, it is generally not recommended to take multiple live vaccines simultaneously, so you either need to stagger them or switch to a 'dead' version if that is an option. For example, since I needed yellow fever and also typhoid, my travel doc gave me the yellow fever shot and the typhoid shot (dead), rather than the oral typhoid vaccine (live).
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 07:13 AM
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does anyone know a good travel doc in manhattan?
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 08:08 AM
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elainegary: We just go to a overseas medical clinic in SF. I suggest doing a google and then call them to see if it is drop in or appt. They ususally are the only ones who have something specialized like a yellow fever vaccine.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 08:11 AM
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Also may I correct cybor hepatitis A and B are prevalent in the US. A is the infectious type and B is the blood borne type which I believe requires several vaccinations. The A is good to get for sure whereever you travel. Check with the docs for sure.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 08:12 AM
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Sorry cybor, I misread your reply- I stand corrected.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:00 AM
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Elaine, I used the link from the CDC site to travel clinics, and did indeed find many in Manhattan. I used Dr. Morledge, at 150 E 58 st 18th floor. They gave me an appointment in one day. I actually saw a physician's assistant, but she seemed to have all the facts on the tip of her tongue, and I was pleased.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 09:27 AM
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We went to a travel doc, who advised we have all innoculations. We did so, with no side affects, and are glad we did. It is no big deal, and as others have said; better safe than sorry.
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Old Nov 22nd, 2006, 11:35 PM
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Thanks all, for your advice. Have good Thanksgivings. We'll be at our doctor's on Monday for the polio booster. And perhaps we'll also call Dr. Morledge's office, Anne. Since we're only going to Tanzania and not Kenya, we've (til now) opted not to get the yellow fever. But by MOnday, we'll have had hep a, tetanus, typhoid, polio, and will take the malarone pills with us
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Old Nov 23rd, 2006, 04:38 AM
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Yellow Fever isn't required for entry to Tanzania OR Kenya if arriving from a western country (US, Europe). Unless you plan to travel to a country, i.e., South Africa within a few weeks after having been to East Africa, would YF be required for entry to SA.

YF is expensive, so if not necessary, you may want to pass on this. But, it's your decision in discussion with your physician.
 
Old Nov 24th, 2006, 08:25 AM
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Thank you all for your responses. I guess that we will have the inocculations quickly. I had been told by South Africans that it is ridiculous.However as you said, better safe than sorry. Now to convince my needle phobic daughter!
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