Egypt Egyptian Arabic

Reply

Sep 27th, 2005, 09:19 AM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 72
Egypt Egyptian Arabic

I would like to learn Arabic. Is Egyptian Arabic universally understood or completely different from "Eastern Arabic?" For example most language educational companies offer courses in American English and British English, but for the most part, someone who learned American English could communicate in Britain and Vice Versa. Is it the same with Egyptian Arabic and Eastern Arabic? Which, if either is more universally understood?
meadow_zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 27th, 2005, 10:10 AM
  #2
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 665
I am going to Egypt and Jordan for the month of November and have been learning Egyptian Arabic - I am using a basic course, nothing fancy but want to learn enough phrases to at least be civil to people. Arabic has a lot of different variations and dialects. It depends on where you plan to travel. If you want basic Arabic, I would learn regular Arabic, not Egyptian Arabic which has differences. If your purpose is for travel within Egypt, I would choose Egyptian Arabic.
wanderlust5 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 27th, 2005, 02:13 PM
  #3
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
Egyptian Arabic is actually the easiest Arabic dialect to understand for most Arabs from other countries/regions.

Standard rabic is the Arabic used in the Media, books, Koran, and formal speechs. So it's also understood by all Arabs.

Keep in mind that Egyptian Arabic is only spoken but never written. And all Arabs from all regions write in standard Arabic.
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 28th, 2005, 08:34 AM
  #4
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 72
I had no idea that Egyptian Arabic is not written. Thanks!
meadow_zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 28th, 2005, 01:05 PM
  #5
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
It's just a spoken dialect.

Let's take the word moon for exaple:

In standrad Arabic it's "Qamar"

In Egyptian Arabic it's "Amar"

All the Q sounds are pronounced A in Egyptian Arabic. But when Egyptians write down the word moon, they write " Qamar" however, they pronounced it "Amar"

Hope this helps!
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 28th, 2005, 01:08 PM
  #6
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
They pronounce it not "pronouned it"
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 01:10 AM
  #7
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 65
Actually, it is more than just pronounciation.... Egypt over the centuries mixed with and was influenced by other nations (for example Turks during the Ottoman Empire... Europeans: French, British, Italians and Greeks during the 19th and first half of the 20th century) and hence the "spoken Egyptian" includes words from all of these origins... in addition to Arabic of course and a few words dating from the time of the Pharoes (obviously).

For instance, the formal arabic word for balcony would be "Shorfa" ... but when speaking among ourselves we would say "balcona" (of Italian or French origin). Similarly instead of useing "Shorta" they would say "Police" , to refer to a dress instead of "Thaob" they would say "Fostan" (Turkish) etc...

The reason Egyptian Arabic dialect is well understood throughout the Arab world is because most movies, TV soap operas, singers etc watched all over the region... were Egyptian... (I would say 80+%) .... another historical reason during the 1950s, 60s and maybe later.... a large number of Egyptian teachers were called upon to teach in schools in the Arab Gulf (untill now), Tunisia, Libya etc...
Sherif is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 08:44 AM
  #8
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
Sherif, "balacona" "shorta" and " fostan" are also used in Saudi, Lebanese, Syrian, Jordanian/Palestinian dialects. That could be due to the strong influence of Egyptian Arabic actually.

But still, these are only spoken dialects. But I don't think a tourist would want to read a book in Arabic or watch the news on Arab TV. So by learning the Egyptian dialect, you'll also be understood through out the Arab world, even in Morocco where the local dialect sounds like another language to all other Arabs outside of Morocco, Tunisia, and Algeria.
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 12:31 PM
  #9
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 72
Thank you. This is all very fascinating and really helping me understand some of the fundamental elements that make Egyptian Arabic unique. So, in short for purposes of at least communicating effectively with MOST speakers of Arabic (I realize there are not blanket rules etc.)would Egyptian Arabic serve the purpose or is it too regional to be universally understood?
meadow_zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 12:33 PM
  #10
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 72
Now that I'm reading the responses my question seems a bit redundant, but feel free to add more input if anyone would like.
meadow_zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 12:34 PM
  #11
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 72
I meant to say "reading the responses AGAIN"
meadow_zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 02:24 PM
  #12
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
More words taken from Euroipean languages:

"Parooka" = Italian for wig, used in most Arabic dialects.

"Pantalon" = Italian for Pants, also used in most Arabic dialects!

"Sechoir" pronounced "Seshwar" it's French for hair dryer, but it's also used in most Arabic dialects!

I too find that faschnating because some European languages like Spanish have so many words of Arabic origin!
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 02:25 PM
  #13
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
European not Euroipean...
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 29th, 2005, 05:28 PM
  #14
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
Just thought I'd add that the standard Arabic word for Hair dryer is "Mojaffef Al- Sha'ar" !
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 30th, 2005, 02:07 AM
  #15
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 65
MNSS

Spanish of course is a special case, since it was ruled by Arabs for several centuries (and so would be Maltese)...

Azucar, Arroz, Azeitoun (sugar, rice and olives) are three Spanish words that come to mind that are of Arabic origin...

other more universally used words of Arabic origin would be:

Chemistry (Alchemy) coming from the Arabic Al Kemyaa

Algorythms .... derived from the name Al Khawarizmy who invented/dicovered algorythms apparently

Alcohol (Al Kohol)

Algebra (from Al Gabr)
Sherif is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 30th, 2005, 03:13 AM
  #16
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 65
Interestingly, sometimes the same spoken word mean different things between Arabs of different nationalities... a bit like the word "rubber" having different meanings between English and American. For instance "Barrad" for Egyptians refers to tea kettle while for Jordanians and Palestinians is refers to "refrigerator"

On the following link one can find a brief dictionary for spoken Arabic in Egyptian dialect (with sound files... which could be useful...):

http://www.touregypt.net/translat.htm
(even though the lower half of the page tends to drift to formal Arabic)

Sherif is offline  
Reply With Quote
Sep 30th, 2005, 04:46 AM
  #17
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 274
Saudies say Barrad= what you serve tea in as well!

by the way the German word for "sugar" is also of Arabic origin! it's "Zucker" it's pronounced'(tsucker) which is very close to the Arabic (sukkar) ya Shreef ya sukkar!
mnss is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:32 PM.