New Zealand

TRAVEL GUIDE

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From the Bay of Islands' pristine beaches in the north to the soaring pinnacles of Milford Sound in the south, New Zealand is a stunner. Glaciated mountains, steaming volcanoes, and lush forests give adventurers a vast array of ecological playgrounds to explore. While hikers retreat to 14 national parks, bird-watchers find their bliss on peaceful Stewart Island. But it's not all parks and rec. Māori enclaves display deep native heritage, idyllic vineyards produce world-class wines, and vibrant dining and arts scenes thrive in cities like Auckland and Wellington.

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Auckland

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling...

Christchurch

Earthquakes aside, the face of Christchurch is changing, fueled by both New Zealand residents drawn from other centers as well as immigrants...

Wellington

Wellington, the seat of government since 1865, is between the sea and towering hillsides that form a natural arena with the harbor as the stage...

Queenstown

Set on the edge of the glacial Lake Wakatipu, with stunning views of the sawtooth peaks of the Remarkables mountain range, Queenstown is the...

Dunedin

Clinging to the walls of the natural amphitheater at the west end of Otago Harbour, the South Island's second-largest city is enriched with...

Wanaka

On the southern shore of Lake Wanaka, with some of New Zealand's most striking mountains behind it, Wanaka is the welcome mat for Mount Aspiring...

Stewart Island

Stewart Island, home to New Zealand's newest national park, Rakiura, is the third largest and most southerly of New Zealand's main islands,...

Tauranga

The population center of the Bay of Plenty, Tauranga is one of New Zealand's fastest-growing cities. Along with neighboring town, Whakatane...

Palmerston North

Palmerston North—or "Palmy" as the locals call it—is home to several major educational and research institutes. Thanks to these, students make...

Nelson

Relaxed, hospitable, and easy to explore on foot, Nelson has a way of always making you feel as though you should stay longer. You can make...

Blenheim

Many people come to Blenheim (pronounced bleh -num by the locals) for the wine. There are dozens of wineries in the area, some with stylish...

Westland/Tai Poutini National Park

Westland/Tai Poutini is a place of extremes, from the highest mountains to most ancient rain forest, and certainly extreme precipitation. ...

New Plymouth

New Plymouth serves one of New Zealand's most productive dairy regions as well as the gas and oil industries. This natural wealth translates...

Rotorua

Visitors tend to have a love-hate relationship with Rotorua (ro-to-roo-ah). Millions of them—both from New Zealand and abroad—flock in each...

Napier

The earthquake that struck Napier at 10:46 am on February 3, 1931, was—at 7.8 on the Richter scale—the largest quake ever recorded in New Zealand...

Invercargill

Originally settled by Scottish immigrants, Invercargill has retained much of its turn-of-the-20th-century character, with broad main avenues...

Gisborne

The Māori name for the Gisborne district is Tairawhiti (tye-ra- fee -tee), "the coast upon which the sun shines across the water," and Gisborne...

Picton

The maritime township of Picton (population 4,000) is a popular boating spot and has two sizable marinas, the smaller at Picton Harbour and...

Thames

The peninsula's oldest town, Thames has evolved from a gold-mining hotbed in the late 1800s to an agricultural center. Locals have a saying...

Taupo

The tidy town of Taupo is the base for exploring Lake Taupo, the country's largest lake. Its placid shores are backed by volcanic mountains...

Hawke's Bay

Bounded by the Kaweka and Ruahine ranges, Hawke's Bay is known as the fruit basket of New Zealand. You can't travel far without seeing a vineyard...

Coromandel Town

Coromandel town became the site of New Zealand's first gold strike in 1852 when sawmill worker Charles Ring found gold-bearing quartz at Driving...

Te Anau

Lake Te Anau (tay- ah -no), which is 53 km (33 miles) long and up to 10 km (6 miles) wide, is the largest lake in New Zealand after Lake Taupo...

Kaikoura

The town of Kaikoura sits at the base of a peninsula that juts into the ocean from the east coast, and is backed by the steep Kaikoura mountain...

Hanmer Springs

People used to come to Hanmer Springs to chill out with quiet soaks in the hot pools and to take gentle forest walks, but things have been changing...

Akaroa and the Banks Peninsula

Sheep graze almost to the water's edge in the many small bays indenting the coastline of Banks Peninsula, the nub that juts into the Pacific...

Whakatane

For yet another chance to laze on the beach, Whakatane (fah-kah- tah -ne) is indisputably the North Island's sunniest town. The harbor here...

Greymouth

The town of Greymouth is aptly named—at first take, it's a rather dispirited strip of motels and industrial buildings stretched along a wild...

Methven

Methven's main claim to fame is as a ski town. It's a one-hour drive from Christchurch and the closest town to Mt. Hutt, which has New Zealand...

Mackenzie Country and Lake Tekapo

You will know you have reached the Mackenzie Country after you cross Burkes Pass and the woodland is suddenly replaced by high-country tussock...

Paihia and Waitangi

As the main vacation base for the Bay of Islands, Paihia is an unremarkable stretch of motels at odds with the quiet beauty of the island-studded...

Whitianga

As you descend from the hills on the Coromandel's east coast, you'll enter Whitianga township. Here you'll find Buffalo Beach, named for the...

Wanganui

A major gateway to Whanganui National Park, Wanganui is worthy in its own right. Its compact center has lively streets with shops and galleries...

Raglan

It's hard to think of a more laid-back, welcoming spot than Raglan. On the drive out, tune in to radio station Raglan FM 98.1 to catch the...

Kerikeri

Kerikeri is often referred to as the cradle of the nation because so much of New Zealand's earliest history, especially interactions between...

Golden Bay and Takaka

The gorgeous stretch of coastline that begins at Separation Point, in Abel Tasman National Park, and runs westward past Takaka to Farewell Spit...

Waitomo

Waitomo is a busy little village located a short drive from the main highway. Above ground, the surrounding hills are a mix of native bush and...

Westport

One of New Zealand's oldest ports sits at the mouth of the mighty Buller River. Once a boomtown for two separate gold rushes, it's now a quiet...

Timaru

Timaru, whose name comes from the Māori " Te Maru " (shelter), began life as two towns, one called Government Town and the other Rhodestown...

Abel Tasman National Park

Abel Tasman National Park is a stunning-yet-accessible swath of idyllic beaches and estuaries backed by a hinterland of native beech forests...

Hokitika

Hokitika is one of the larger towns along the West Coast, with the pounding ocean before it and bush-covered hills behind. It's a place of simple...

Martinborough

The pleasant town of Martinborough embodies the changes that have taken place in the Wairarapa as a result of the burgeoning wine industry....

Russell

Russell is regarded as the "second" town in the Bay of Islands, but it's far more interesting, and pleasant, than Paihia. Hard as it is to believe...

Whangarei

The main center in Northland is the Whangarei ( fahng -ar-ay) District; Whangarei Harbour was traditionally a meeting place for Māori tribes...

Murchison

Surrounded by high mountains and roaring rivers, this small town is in some big country. With Nelson Lakes National Park to the east, Kahurangi...

Cambridge

For many travelers, Cambridge provides a good lunch break on their way elsewhere. But this cute town, with its historic buildings and rural...

Arrowtown

Arrowtown is tucked into a corner at the foot of the steep Crown Range. It’s a quaint village that takes pride in the history of the area, with...

Aoraki/Mt. Cook National Park

Endless rolling hills, bungy jumps off high bridges, the glittering Skytower of Auckland . . . so you think you've experienced the grandeur...

Milford Sound

Fiordland National Park's most accessible and busiest attraction is Milford Sound; in some ways it's also the most dramatic. Hemmed in by walls...

Motueka

Motueka (mo-too- eh -ka) is a horticultural center—hops, kiwifruit, and apples are among its staples. As a major gateway to two national parks...

Egmont National Park

Rising 8,261 feet above sea level, Mt. Taranaki dominates the landscape of this national park. It's difficult not to be drawn toward it. The...

Geraldine

For years, this lovely town has been a favorite stop on the road to Aoraki/Mt. Cook; these days, it's becoming a magnet in southern Canterbury...

Hokianga and the Kauri Coast

A peaceful harbor moves inland into the Hokianga region. It's a quiet area with small towns, unspoiled scenery, and proximity to the giant kauri...

The Whanganui River and Whanganui National Park

The Whanganui, the longest continually navigable river in New Zealand, flows through one of the country’s largest remaining areas of native...

Karamea

North of Westport, the coastline is squeezed between high mountain ranges and pounding surf. The highlight of the tiny settlements along this...

Lyttelton

Lyttelton, a sleepy port town, was the arrival point for many of the early Canterbury settlers. The Canterbury Pilgrims' landing place is marked...

Tongariro National Park

Tongariro has a spectacular combination of dense forest, wild open countryside, crater lakes, barren lava fields, and rock-strewn mountain slopes...

Whangamata

The Coromandel Ranges back Whangamata (fahng-a-ma- ta ), another harborside town, with a population of around 3,500. Once a town of modest houses...

Katikati

The small town of Katikati was built on land confiscated from local Māori after the 1863 land wars and given to Irish Protestant settlers by...

Havelock

Known as the Greenshell mussel capital of the world (Greenshells are a variety of green-lipped mussel), Havelock is at the head of Pelorus and...

Te Urewera National Park

New Zealand's fourth-largest national park protects the biggest area of native forest remaining on the North Island. The ancestral home of the...

Tairua

Tairua is one of the larger communities along the coast, and one of the prettiest, nestled beside an estuary, harbor, and hills, with an ocean...

Colville and Beyond

To reach land's end in the very north of the Coromandel Peninsula—with rugged coastline, delightful coves, and pastures—take the 30-minute drive...

Nelson Lakes National Park

Spread around mountains and two spectacular glacial lakes, Rotoroa and Rotoiti, the Nelson Lakes National Park also extends to high alpine passes...

Stratford

Sitting under the eastern side of Mt. Taranaki, Stratford is a service town for surrounding farms. Its streets are named after characters from...

Twizel

A service town to its core, Twizel was built in 1968 as a base for workers constructing a major hydroelectric power plant. When the hydroelectric...

Arthur's Pass National Park

Established in 1929, Arthur's Pass was the South Island's first national park. Follow in the footsteps of ancient Māori hunters, 1860s gold...

Palliser Bay and Cape Palliser

This, the most southerly part of the North Island's coast, can be a wild and desolate area in winter. But the lighthouse and seal colony at...

Paparoa National Park

Paparoa National Park extends from the forest-covered Paparoa Range inland, to the coast. With steep bluffs, limestone basins, canyons, caves...

Hawera

This quiet country town, a hub for the farming community, provides a close look at the local history and way of life. Brush up on its backstory...

Kapiti Island

Paraparaumu is the departure point for one of Wellington's best-kept secrets: Kapiti Island. A protected reserve since 1897, the island is a...

Warkworth

A sleepy town on the banks of the Mahurangi River, Warkworth was established in 1853. With lime mined from the local river, it became the first...

Oamaru

In Oamaru's port district New Zealand's best-preserved collection of historical landmarks still gleam with ornate, limestone Victorian facades...

Kahurangi National Park

New Zealand's second-largest national park, Kahurangi is 1.1 million acres of marbled mountains with fluted rock forms, arches, shafts, and...

Whakaari (White) Island

With its billowing plumes of steam, the active volcano of Whakaari (White) Island makes for an awesome geothermal experience. The island is...

Mount Aspiring National Park

Roads only skirt the edge of this huge park, which compels you to hike, boat, and fly to see it. Only a winged, hoofed super-creature could...

Maketu

About halfway between Tauranga and Whakatane is the small seaside village of Maketu, one of the area's least-developed places and one of the...

Nga Motu–Sugar Loaf Islands

About 17,000 seabirds nest in the Nga Motu–Sugar Loaf Islands Marine Protected Area, located just off shore from the Taranaki Port, near New...

Auckland

Auckland is called the City of Sails, and visitors flying in will see why. On the East Coast is the Waitemata Harbour—a Māori word meaning sparkling...

Christchurch

Earthquakes aside, the face of Christchurch is changing, fueled by both New Zealand residents drawn from other centers as well as immigrants...

Wellington

Wellington, the seat of government since 1865, is between the sea and towering hillsides that form a natural arena with the harbor as the stage...

Queenstown

Set on the edge of the glacial Lake Wakatipu, with stunning views of the sawtooth peaks of the Remarkables mountain range, Queenstown is the...

Dunedin

Clinging to the walls of the natural amphitheater at the west end of Otago Harbour, the South Island's second-largest city is enriched with...

Wanaka

On the southern shore of Lake Wanaka, with some of New Zealand's most striking mountains behind it, Wanaka is the welcome mat for Mount Aspiring...

Tauranga

The population center of the Bay of Plenty, Tauranga is one of New Zealand's fastest-growing cities. Along with neighboring town, Whakatane...

Palmerston North

Palmerston North—or "Palmy" as the locals call it—is home to several major educational and research institutes. Thanks to these, students make...

Nelson

Relaxed, hospitable, and easy to explore on foot, Nelson has a way of always making you feel as though you should stay longer. You can make...

Blenheim

Many people come to Blenheim (pronounced bleh -num by the locals) for the wine. There are dozens of wineries in the area, some with stylish...

New Plymouth

New Plymouth serves one of New Zealand's most productive dairy regions as well as the gas and oil industries. This natural wealth translates...

Rotorua

Visitors tend to have a love-hate relationship with Rotorua (ro-to-roo-ah). Millions of them—both from New Zealand and abroad—flock in each...

Napier

The earthquake that struck Napier at 10:46 am on February 3, 1931, was—at 7.8 on the Richter scale—the largest quake ever recorded in New Zealand...

Invercargill

Originally settled by Scottish immigrants, Invercargill has retained much of its turn-of-the-20th-century character, with broad main avenues...

Gisborne

The Māori name for the Gisborne district is Tairawhiti (tye-ra- fee -tee), "the coast upon which the sun shines across the water," and Gisborne...

Picton

The maritime township of Picton (population 4,000) is a popular boating spot and has two sizable marinas, the smaller at Picton Harbour and...

Thames

The peninsula's oldest town, Thames has evolved from a gold-mining hotbed in the late 1800s to an agricultural center. Locals have a saying...

Taupo

The tidy town of Taupo is the base for exploring Lake Taupo, the country's largest lake. Its placid shores are backed by volcanic mountains...

Hawke's Bay

Bounded by the Kaweka and Ruahine ranges, Hawke's Bay is known as the fruit basket of New Zealand. You can't travel far without seeing a vineyard...

Coromandel Town

Coromandel town became the site of New Zealand's first gold strike in 1852 when sawmill worker Charles Ring found gold-bearing quartz at Driving...

Te Anau

Lake Te Anau (tay- ah -no), which is 53 km (33 miles) long and up to 10 km (6 miles) wide, is the largest lake in New Zealand after Lake Taupo...

Kaikoura

The town of Kaikoura sits at the base of a peninsula that juts into the ocean from the east coast, and is backed by the steep Kaikoura mountain...

Hanmer Springs

People used to come to Hanmer Springs to chill out with quiet soaks in the hot pools and to take gentle forest walks, but things have been changing...

Greymouth

The town of Greymouth is aptly named—at first take, it's a rather dispirited strip of motels and industrial buildings stretched along a wild...

Whakatane

For yet another chance to laze on the beach, Whakatane (fah-kah- tah -ne) is indisputably the North Island's sunniest town. The harbor here...

Akaroa and the Banks Peninsula

Sheep graze almost to the water's edge in the many small bays indenting the coastline of Banks Peninsula, the nub that juts into the Pacific...

Methven

Methven's main claim to fame is as a ski town. It's a one-hour drive from Christchurch and the closest town to Mt. Hutt, which has New Zealand...

Mackenzie Country and Lake Tekapo

You will know you have reached the Mackenzie Country after you cross Burkes Pass and the woodland is suddenly replaced by high-country tussock...

Paihia and Waitangi

As the main vacation base for the Bay of Islands, Paihia is an unremarkable stretch of motels at odds with the quiet beauty of the island-studded...

Whitianga

As you descend from the hills on the Coromandel's east coast, you'll enter Whitianga township. Here you'll find Buffalo Beach, named for the...

Raglan

It's hard to think of a more laid-back, welcoming spot than Raglan. On the drive out, tune in to radio station Raglan FM 98.1 to catch the...

Wanganui

A major gateway to Whanganui National Park, Wanganui is worthy in its own right. Its compact center has lively streets with shops and galleries...

Kerikeri

Kerikeri is often referred to as the cradle of the nation because so much of New Zealand's earliest history, especially interactions between...

Waitomo

Waitomo is a busy little village located a short drive from the main highway. Above ground, the surrounding hills are a mix of native bush and...

Golden Bay and Takaka

The gorgeous stretch of coastline that begins at Separation Point, in Abel Tasman National Park, and runs westward past Takaka to Farewell Spit...

Westport

One of New Zealand's oldest ports sits at the mouth of the mighty Buller River. Once a boomtown for two separate gold rushes, it's now a quiet...

Timaru

Timaru, whose name comes from the Māori " Te Maru " (shelter), began life as two towns, one called Government Town and the other Rhodestown...

Martinborough

The pleasant town of Martinborough embodies the changes that have taken place in the Wairarapa as a result of the burgeoning wine industry....

Russell

Russell is regarded as the "second" town in the Bay of Islands, but it's far more interesting, and pleasant, than Paihia. Hard as it is to believe...

Whangarei

The main center in Northland is the Whangarei ( fahng -ar-ay) District; Whangarei Harbour was traditionally a meeting place for Māori tribes...

Murchison

Surrounded by high mountains and roaring rivers, this small town is in some big country. With Nelson Lakes National Park to the east, Kahurangi...

Hokitika

Hokitika is one of the larger towns along the West Coast, with the pounding ocean before it and bush-covered hills behind. It's a place of simple...

Cambridge

For many travelers, Cambridge provides a good lunch break on their way elsewhere. But this cute town, with its historic buildings and rural...

Aoraki/Mt. Cook National Park

Endless rolling hills, bungy jumps off high bridges, the glittering Skytower of Auckland . . . so you think you've experienced the grandeur...

Arrowtown

Arrowtown is tucked into a corner at the foot of the steep Crown Range. It’s a quaint village that takes pride in the history of the area, with...

Milford Sound

Fiordland National Park's most accessible and busiest attraction is Milford Sound; in some ways it's also the most dramatic. Hemmed in by walls...

Motueka

Motueka (mo-too- eh -ka) is a horticultural center—hops, kiwifruit, and apples are among its staples. As a major gateway to two national parks...

Geraldine

For years, this lovely town has been a favorite stop on the road to Aoraki/Mt. Cook; these days, it's becoming a magnet in southern Canterbury...

Hokianga and the Kauri Coast

A peaceful harbor moves inland into the Hokianga region. It's a quiet area with small towns, unspoiled scenery, and proximity to the giant kauri...

Karamea

North of Westport, the coastline is squeezed between high mountain ranges and pounding surf. The highlight of the tiny settlements along this...

Lyttelton

Lyttelton, a sleepy port town, was the arrival point for many of the early Canterbury settlers. The Canterbury Pilgrims' landing place is marked...

Whangamata

The Coromandel Ranges back Whangamata (fahng-a-ma- ta ), another harborside town, with a population of around 3,500. Once a town of modest houses...

Havelock

Known as the Greenshell mussel capital of the world (Greenshells are a variety of green-lipped mussel), Havelock is at the head of Pelorus and...

Katikati

The small town of Katikati was built on land confiscated from local Māori after the 1863 land wars and given to Irish Protestant settlers by...

Tairua

Tairua is one of the larger communities along the coast, and one of the prettiest, nestled beside an estuary, harbor, and hills, with an ocean...

Colville and Beyond

To reach land's end in the very north of the Coromandel Peninsula—with rugged coastline, delightful coves, and pastures—take the 30-minute drive...

Palliser Bay and Cape Palliser

This, the most southerly part of the North Island's coast, can be a wild and desolate area in winter. But the lighthouse and seal colony at...

Stratford

Sitting under the eastern side of Mt. Taranaki, Stratford is a service town for surrounding farms. Its streets are named after characters from...

Twizel

A service town to its core, Twizel was built in 1968 as a base for workers constructing a major hydroelectric power plant. When the hydroelectric...

Hawera

This quiet country town, a hub for the farming community, provides a close look at the local history and way of life. Brush up on its backstory...

Warkworth

A sleepy town on the banks of the Mahurangi River, Warkworth was established in 1853. With lime mined from the local river, it became the first...

Oamaru

In Oamaru's port district New Zealand's best-preserved collection of historical landmarks still gleam with ornate, limestone Victorian facades...

Kahurangi National Park

New Zealand's second-largest national park, Kahurangi is 1.1 million acres of marbled mountains with fluted rock forms, arches, shafts, and...

Maketu

About halfway between Tauranga and Whakatane is the small seaside village of Maketu, one of the area's least-developed places and one of the...

Upper South Island and the West Coast

The South Island has been carved by ice, water, and tectonic uplift, all processes still rapidly occurring. Here, the mellow farmland greens...

Christchurch and Canterbury

With its vast food basket, water, and natural resources, Canterbury could be its own country. The expansive coast, fertile plains, and snow...

The Southern Alps and Fiordland

There are hundreds of glaciers locked in the Southern Alps, slowly grinding their way down to lower altitudes and melting into running rivers...

The Coromandel and the Bay of Plenty

Beautiful sandy beaches, lush native forests, and some steamy geothermal activity make the Coromandel and Bay of Plenty quite a departure from...

East Coast and the Volcanic Zone

When you get to Rotorua, after a trip through the rolling, sheep-speckled fields of the Waikato and the wild Mamaku Ranges, the aptly named...

North Island's West Coast

The North Island's West Coast encompasses a diversity of landscapes: top surfing beaches; world-renowned limestone caves; and two national parks...

Wellington and the Wairarapa

Wellington has developed the lively, friendly, and infectious spirit of a city coming into its own. From the windswept green heights overlooking...

Otago, Invercargill, and Stewart Island

Otago Province takes up much of the southeast quadrant of the South Island and has two distinct regions, each a drawcard in its own right. Offering...

Northland and the Bay of Islands

Northland is the place to go when you seek more than great restaurants and shopping. You'll be best served on a trip here by taking in inspiring...

Nearby Rotorua

The countryside near Rotorua includes magnificent untamed territory with lakes and rivers full of some of the largest rainbow and brown trout...

Around Hahei

The beaches, coves, and seaside villages around Hahei make for a great day of exploring—or lounging. If you're craving a true beach vacation...

Waipara Valley

Once known for its hot, dry summers and sheep farms, the Waipara Valley is now an established vineyard area. The local Riesling, Chardonnay...

Otago Peninsula

The main items of interest along the claw-shape peninsula that extends northeast from Dunedin are an albatross colony and Larnach Castle. The...

Masterton and Environs

Masterton is Wairarapa's major population center, and, like Martinborough to the south, it's in a developing wine region. There's not much to...

Nearby Nelson

Though Nelson's a bustling city, it retains a rural quality. Overlooking Tasman Bay and the foothills of the Bryant and Richmond ranges behind...

Waihi to Paeroa

The southern Coromandel is bounded by the historic and scenic Karangahake Gorge and smaller, adjoining Waikino Gorge. State Highway 2 wends...

Lake Manapouri and Doubtful Sound

Just 20 minutes south of Te Anau, Lake Manapouri has long had the reputation as one of New Zealand's prettiest lakes. The lake is hemmed by...

The 309 Road

Although named for a journey that used to (apparently) take 309 minutes, the 309 Road cuts right across the peninsula and is now the shortest...

Tapu–Coroglen Road

The 28-km-long (17-mile-long), intermittently paved Tapu–Coroglen Road turns off State Highway 25 in the hamlet of Tapu to wind into the mountains...

Westland/Tai Poutini National Park

Westland/Tai Poutini is a place of extremes, from the highest mountains to most ancient rain forest, and certainly extreme precipitation. ...

Abel Tasman National Park

Abel Tasman National Park is a stunning-yet-accessible swath of idyllic beaches and estuaries backed by a hinterland of native beech forests...

The Whanganui River and Whanganui National Park

The Whanganui, the longest continually navigable river in New Zealand, flows through one of the country’s largest remaining areas of native...

Egmont National Park

Rising 8,261 feet above sea level, Mt. Taranaki dominates the landscape of this national park. It's difficult not to be drawn toward it. The...

Tongariro National Park

Tongariro has a spectacular combination of dense forest, wild open countryside, crater lakes, barren lava fields, and rock-strewn mountain slopes...

Te Urewera National Park

New Zealand's fourth-largest national park protects the biggest area of native forest remaining on the North Island. The ancestral home of the...

Nelson Lakes National Park

Spread around mountains and two spectacular glacial lakes, Rotoroa and Rotoiti, the Nelson Lakes National Park also extends to high alpine passes...

Paparoa National Park

Paparoa National Park extends from the forest-covered Paparoa Range inland, to the coast. With steep bluffs, limestone basins, canyons, caves...

Arthur's Pass National Park

Established in 1929, Arthur's Pass was the South Island's first national park. Follow in the footsteps of ancient Māori hunters, 1860s gold...

Mount Aspiring National Park

Roads only skirt the edge of this huge park, which compels you to hike, boat, and fly to see it. Only a winged, hoofed super-creature could...

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