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Where's a great place to live?

Old May 10th, 2002, 06:11 AM
  #21  
kate
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hmmmm...a troll perhaps??
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 10:22 AM
  #22  
Jody
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If I could live anywhere, it would be Ann Arbor, Michigan
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 11:23 AM
  #23  
Una
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Try Montreal, Canada for two-three years
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 11:29 AM
  #24  
Bob
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Indianapolis?? I don't think so. I'd say Minneapolis. If you don't mind a few months of cold weather, its a great place to live. Excellent restaurants, theatre, museums, recreation, all major sport teams, clean air/water, relatively affordable homes, strong high-tech/corporate/medical/banking/retail center, and NWA hubs there so you can easily access warm climates when necessary. Oh yeah, and an entertaining governor to boot!
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 12:18 PM
  #25  
wanna no
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A BIG THANK YOU TO ALL WHO REPLIED TO MY QUESTION

To Frank: Take a pill and get over whatever issues you have. The question may have seemed too general for you, but there are plenty of intelligent people that understood the question with out me going into boring details about who I am and our current lifestyle.

To Jack: Excellent info! Looks like you've done your homework!

To Helen & Sam: I don't mind the cold. In fact my husband and I lived in London, Ontario-Canada while he was getting his MBA. Why didn't we stay? Better job offers elsewhere.

To those who wonder why we want to leave LA:

Yes, LA has great weather, all the hot spots a city could ask for, but what it lacks, is affordable housing. We're very fortunate to have a decent household income (well over 100k) but even so, we can't afford a nice house in the city. LA housing falls into 3 general categories (omitting condo's) : 1) Very Expensive beautiful homes in prestigious areas ie; Beverly Hills, Brentwood, etc. 2) Track housing in "planned communities", and 3) Post war houses, which are very small, dated, need repairs, and still go for over half a million dollars.

Track housing with a minimum 45-minute commute to work is not our style. We're not the handyman types, so post war housing is not a good investment. As for BH and Brentwood, WE WISH!!

Thanks again for all your suggestions.
We'll keep all your cities in mind during our search!

 
Old May 10th, 2002, 12:26 PM
  #26  
David
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Wanna no,

I think that it will be almost impossible to find a city which will meet all of your criteria. If you find such a place, please let us know. Thank you.
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 02:29 PM
  #27  
charles
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uNFORTUNATELY, ANY CITY THAT OFFERS the first 2 things you want, is going to be expensive because people will want to live there. No one has repealed the laws of supply and demand, or the law of gravity, yet.
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 02:53 PM
  #28  
Frank
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Sweetheart,
The question didn't seem too general for me, I thought I made it clear that it was just plain idiotic - that's all. In fact, you have just bolstered that fact by revealing that you are unable to afford (budget/spending issues here?) a nice residence in the vast LA area with "well over 100 thousand dollars per year". I live in a much more costly city and make less than that.

Let me throw the dart again -- Montgomery, Alabama! Sounds good!
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 04:13 PM
  #29  
Mona
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Good to hear more about your requirements. Isn't Orange County more affordable for what you're looking for or would it be a long commute? Some of the nicest cities don't always have the best schools (unfortunately, I've learned this from moving around myself). Are schools of any importance in the selection process? It wasn't mentioned but i've learned you can't take decent school for granted. Mona
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 04:31 PM
  #30  
nyc
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Well I guess your second response pretty much eliminates NYC - there was an article about people selling their apartments to rent in Manhattan because co-op condo values are still so high and rents are "down" to $2000-2200 or so for a average (650sf) 1BR.
Your a & b clash with c.
Do you want to live in real a city center (apt/townhouse) or do you want a real "house"? That is a big difference between a lot of cities.
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 05:26 PM
  #31  
Jack
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So you live in the city m'am.

That's nice.

And your husband is a brilliant financial analyst.

That's nice.

And despite that brilliance the two of you only make "well over 100K" a year.

And "well over 100K" isn't enough for you to be happy on.

Excuse me mam, but what's wrong with this picture......

May I?

Well, lots of things.

The first and foremost is the number of morons who actually wrote advice to you....with the exception of Frank, the one true light in a world of phonies.

Two, if you can't live well on "well over 100K" per year then you are a sad, miserable spoiled little twerp who doesn't deserve the sympathy one would show a cockroach.

Three, if you aren't smart enough or ingenious enough to go out and make your own destiny and find your own place then just maybe you're overpaid for whatever it is you do.

Four, maybe your briliant husband isn't as brilliant as you think as I have a "bright" brother in law...who is a financial analyst in Virginia..and he makes well over a million dollars a year.

Let me suggest you downsize in LA, open up a savings account, go to church and count your blessings for what you have and never place another note on this travel board unless you have something to tell us about the beauty and wonder of Los Angelos.

Jack
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 07:06 PM
  #32  
xxx
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Obviously a lot of people don't understand that $100K income doesn't count for much when you're trying to buy a home in Southern California.
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 07:14 PM
  #33  
Hit the road Jack
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Wanna no sure hit a nerve with you, Jack. Jealous that you have no adoring wife? That no one thinks you're brillant?
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 07:44 PM
  #34  
rick
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- Chicago
- Austin
- Minneapolis/St. Paul
- Atlanta
- Nashville
- Seattle
- Washington D.C.
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 08:20 PM
  #35  
Candace
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Hi there wanna no. I live in Dallas Texas we have excellent job opportunities. We do have cultural activities although not on the grand scale that you may desire but we have them. Housing costs are rising because Dallas Fort Worth is exploding. The drawbacks here are the topography, it is flat. No ocean. No mountains.
What is your definition of good housing? Also what is your price range we have everything here. Although everything south of the loop is getting pricier and pricier. Lakewood neighborhood you might like it is very eclectic and fun. The summers get hot but I am biased because I have grown so accustomed to the heat it does not bother me personally but many people that move here do not like it. Traffic is bad but nowhere near what you have to drive through..I think Dallasites do not realize how lucky they are in the grand scheme of things in relationship to traffic. Now the poster who suggested Austin is right on target. Austin is hip and fun. You really have more of an outdoors to enjoy. With the bust of the dotcoms housing sales have slowed down there.
My husband and I make a very good living and we are reevaluating everything. We already live modestly. We are considering North Carolina, Charlotte or Raleigh-Durham. I fell in love with it when my husband was up there for a year. It is so breathtaking. I am personally trying to get a better quality of life. I am also considering South Carolina.
Anyway I wish you the best of luck on your pursuits. Take your time. Most of all visit the places you are considering. What I might think is just great you may not care for...
 
Old May 10th, 2002, 08:44 PM
  #36  
Jay
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Wow!
What a COLOSSAL moron Jack-Dragnet is!

You have not a clue, my man.
And you haven't paid attention to the info given by the poster, which makes you look even more foolish.

She and her husband are trying to find a place in the established upscale areas of LA, and in these areas virtually no one makes less than $300,000 per year.
She said nothing about not being able to be happy on less, or on not being able to exist in a lesser area. All she said was that their dream was to have a nicer home in an area of LA they couldn't afford.

If you, Jack, have no goals in life, that's fine with me. And that's your business.
But don't attempt to shackle others with your non-achieving, I'm-a-victim, lazy attitude. This country became the most desirable nation in the world because of the work ethic and drive to succeed shown by generations past. Were the first few generations of Americans as indifferent as you, the USA would be a lot more like Mexico.

Thank you for being one of the few, the prideless, who, fortunate for the rest of us, don't have any influence in shaping this country.
 
Old May 11th, 2002, 08:32 PM
  #37  
foundit
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We have found the ideal city - a place between 100,000 and 300,000 somewhere in the western half of the country. But we like it just the way it is right now so we can't tell you where. Pretty river through town, clean water and air, low crime, large university, good schools and hospitals, highly educated residents, good restaurants.
 
Old May 11th, 2002, 10:40 PM
  #38  
aceplace
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I'll second the nomination for Dallas.

On a smaller scale, Houston and Atlanta might also fill the bill.

In Dallas, however, you'll find the most cultural/entertainment opportunities of the high growth/ high opportunity cities, and you'll find that prices are low relative to income... you'll have a higher standard of living than you do in LA, and in any of the other top 10 metros. Not just for housing, but for restaurants, clothing, all across the board.

If you're used to Los Angeles, you want a large city, not minor league metros like Raleigh, Austin, Nashville, etc. Populationwise, only four urban areas in the US are larger than Dallas... NY, LA, Chicago and San Francisco. And those four have much worse employment opportunities and also a lower standard of living than Dallas.

I'm writing this post on a Saturday night (actually Sunday morning) after having spent the evening at one Dallas entertainment center or another... the city is red-hot for entertainment. Even downtown Dallas is full of people on the streets with some new venues that have recently opened. You'd have plenty to do here.
 
Old May 12th, 2002, 08:22 AM
  #39  
Linda
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San Francisco, Boston, London or Amsterdam...
 
Old May 12th, 2002, 10:03 AM
  #40  
Perspective
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YOUR REPETITIVE MYOPIC FACTUALLY INCORRECT HYPING OF DALLAS BORDERS ON BEING AN ILLNESS!!!!!!!

Give me a BREAK!!!!

Now you're trying to claim that Dallas has the best restaurants, shopping and housing in the ENTIRE USA???!!!

PLease, for anyone still reading this thread, understand that this aceplace character has some type of pathologic need to make Dallas sound like Eden on earth. Same as on other threads.

This is a quote from his post: "....you'll have a higher standard of living (in Dallas) than you do in LA, and in any of the other top 10 metros".

Now if that's not the definition of blind bias I'd like to know what is.
DALLAS has better restaurants than NYC, Chicago, SF, even LA????
Now come on. That's not even worth debating.

Dallas has better shopping than the above? Oh please. Not even close.

And housing? Other than Highland Park, Dallas is nothing but post-1950 ramblers, pseudo southwestern stuccos, and tarck homes. Where are the charming homes and nice unique neighborhoods so may other cities have?
And to even imply that the housing in Dallas is the "best in the USA" just makes you look like a fool aceplace.

Please try not offer such baseless advice to people who might actually give it credence.

 

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