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Wheeled Luggage

Old Jul 26th, 2000, 09:59 AM
  #21  
jim
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How could anyone not appreciate wheeled luggage? Like the post above, each member of my family has the approved 9x14x21 wheeled case, and I insist that we limit our baggage to that plus a backpack for the kids and one of the underseat travel cases for my wife. We (efficiently) carry this on to the plane and magiclly, no more lost luggage, no more waiting at the baggage claim and sooooo much more room in hotel rooms since we only bring what we really need.

As a 100K business travler, I learned long ago how to pack light and now my family has learned this valuable lession.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2000, 04:02 AM
  #22  
Julie
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I think the sales people who sell "Carry-on", "Overhead Bin" luggage to inexperienced travlers who don't know that there's no way the bag will EVER fit into an overhead bin should all be rounded up and dumped in a sewer someplace. The customer assumes, since this kind salesperson told them so, that this bag will easily fit into any plane's overhead bin, when in fact, it won't fit into ANY plane's carry on area. It happened to me -- bought a new bag since I'd be traveling for work often and found out that it fit only in a few overhead bins. I now own another wheeled bag which DOES fit into ANY plane's overhead bin. I wouldn't trade my wheeled luggage or my backpack computer bag for anything. My shoulders love me now. P.S. Checking bags as a business travler add no less than 1/2 hr to an hr's wait to a trip. Yuck.
 
Old Nov 5th, 2000, 02:26 PM
  #23  
Top
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Old Nov 5th, 2000, 02:44 PM
  #24  
Ursula
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My hernia, hemorrhoids and lower back thank the luggage industry for inventing the wheels. Even though I still overpack, if it weren't for those wheels, EGADS..I don't even want to think about it. I'm not kidding either. It is horrible to carry even one loaded bag and then you end up getting the last friggin' gate at the airport. Like 55, and there are gates 1-55. LOL
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 06:52 AM
  #25  
S
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Ya'll seem to forget the problem with the weight of the carry-on bags. We've even progressed to a wheeled back pack at school last year when my daughter started carrying so many books home that the back pack was 50% of her weight. If you've been stuck traveling all day long, the difference between carrying that weight or pulling it can be HUGE at the end of the day!
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 07:36 AM
  #26  
J T Kirk
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My original complaint (though not fully voiced) had to do with the carryon wheeled luggage, much more so than the non-carryon variety. Yes, it would be nice to have wheels on the 500 pound suitcase that is carrying your supplies for the four week odyssey to Katmandu. BUT thewheeled carryon bags!!! They just so rarely fit in the overhead compartments and almost never fit under the seats. Yes, yes, I know the luggage industry has been addressing this problem. Yet why is it NO ONE on the plane I'm on has bothered to get the newer, more streamlined wheeled carryon luggage?!? I have to wait and wait as the person ahead of me tries to squeeze (which wheeled luggage UNLIKE soft luggage doesn't do) it into the overhead compartment. Also, as to the non-carryon luggage -- some people (healthy, vibrant looking people) have a tendency to wheel it VERY slowly through the airport, blocking the way. This is a just a pet peeve. I'll get over it. Eventually.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 11:53 AM
  #27  
Loafer
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You guys would HATE my friend who has a wheeled piece so big she named it "Bob." It's like four feet high and maybe two feet across. It's quite funny, actually.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 12:00 PM
  #28  
Misty
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I sat on a plane for 3 hours recently. I pulled my luggage on wheels and another duffle bag wrapped around it. I walked from the gate to the rental car place...got to my destination. 12 hours later took off my sneakers. the calluses are horrendous. I'm still under medical care for them (this was 10/15). my footcare doctor said, were you pulling any bags? bingo..even wheeling them you can mess up your FEET. be careful out there.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 06:45 PM
  #29  
jeanne
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I am thinking of purchasing some of the dreaded wheeled luggage and would like some recommendations on the best type to buy--size, manufactor....any help from you "pro-wheelers" out there???
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 04:26 AM
  #30  
J T Kirk
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Jeanne, I can't help you with specific manufacturers since I don't use wheeled luggage, BUT look for really stury stuff. I have heard from several people who has used wheeled luggage who have had complaints about either wheels falling off, or wheels not rolling "right." (Let me hasten to add that the luggage industry has made great strides lately improving their wheeled products. Probably because of all the complaints.) I have noticed that nearly everyone sells luggage nowadays, even the Gap (what's up with that?). Look at the zippers, the fabric, the overall constuction. This is one area where I wouldn't buy the cheapest product.
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 05:30 AM
  #31  
trish
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Some of the wheeled carry-on luggage is so heavy! I believe that on some of the international flights the airlines are trying to weight restrict hand luggage again so try to buy something lighter in weight. Personally I prefer the handle mechanism to be concealed and try and get rollerblade typ wheels.
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 07:36 AM
  #32  
Cass
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I both love and hate the things. Once I passed an excessive number of birthdays, I discovered muscle-failure came increasingly frequently while carrying all the stuff I packed "on contingency." Rolling carry-ons have forced me to be far more judicious about what I take, have allowed me to make tight connections without having my luggage go to another solar system, and enabled me to cope with hotels and airports without having to tip every bellhop and skycap along the way.

But I've nearly had my wrist broken when a renegade wheelie decided to go west. And my shoulder comes close to being pulled out of joint every time I try to get the silly thing to jump down a curb so I can run for the rental-car shuttlebus.

Here's what I would tell you to look for if you are buying one:

1. Re: Handle -- get one that slips down inside the case, or at least into a protected pouch. The ones that have handles exposed on the exterior are going to get caught on things, pull out easily, and won't lie flat when you're packing. Also I prefer handles that have grooves or "click-points" that lock the handle at various heights and esp. in the shut-down position. Those that allow the handle to slip-slide up and down with no means of locking them into position will give you fits. The further apart the two upright bars of the handles are, the better for balance and distribution of weight. If the two bars are a foot or less apart, you will have a wrist-breaker on your hands, because the thing will twist constantly.

2. Wheels: Similarly, the wheels should be as far apart at the bottom as possible -- the further apart, the more stable. Watch out for wheels just attached to the bottom with a metal pin, grommet, or whatever. They will get snapped off very quickly, or bent to give you the supermarket-cart wobblies. Best are wheels recessed into plastic protective shells, least likely to catch on other luggage or parts of the luggage-transport system at the airport.

3. Interior: I hate, abominate, despise the ones that are segmented inside or come with separators, with helpful diagrams of how you are supposed to stack your clothes on these pretend "shelves." Don't they realize those cases will be turned upside-down and shaken in all directions? And the shelves themselves take up valuable space. Best are those with very little interior "furniture," just a strap or webbing that can be secured over the pile of clothes. Many use velcro -- which will snag and mess up fine fabrics or pantihose to a faretheewell, esp. while you are in the process of packing.

4. Exterior: This is a matter of taste. I like to have a couple of shallow outside pockets. They're useful for slipping in magazines, maps for the destination, etc. But if too many of the case's cubic inches are devoted to these outside pouches, it's just lost space -- completely unsecurable against theft and likely to put the overall dimensions of the case outside the templates many airlines now use to decide which carry-ons may actually be carried on.

5. Final warning: Take a good look at the zipper. It should be heavy and the fabric it's set in should be strong. If it's a thin, weak zipper in thin, weak fabric, that will be the first thing to go. This is usually the main difference between cheap and expensive cases. If you find a cheap case that has a good zipper, wide-set wheels and handle, and no interior nonsense, get it.

Luggage manufacturers, take note.
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 08:03 AM
  #33  
vanessa
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George,
It's not just "overweight" and "out of shape" people who walk slowly at airports. I've seen plenty of thin people, even those who have obviously just checked in all of their luggage, walking slowly through airport terminals. People take their time for all sorts of reasons. Some might just be wasting time between flights, others might have just come off of a 10 hour or longer flight, and might be completely drained. Whether you have noticed it or not, a big part of flying is often about waiting. On the flip-side, many people are also in a hurry to catch connecting flights or a flight that they are running-late for.
Why don't you think of the obvious reasons why people take their time at the airport before taking the opportunity to blame the world's problems on overweight people. Oh, and thanks for your startling observation that walking fast is good for you.
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 09:30 AM
  #34  
anna
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I know this is the US forum, but on the subject of luggage wheels....If you ever plan to go to Europe with your wheelie-bag, heed the advice about the wheels. As far apart as possible, because the sidewalks are very uneven over there and frequently cobblestoned. Wheels too close together will eventually twist your arm right off over there.
 
Old Nov 10th, 2000, 08:53 AM
  #35  
Lori
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Loafer, slacker a home-------
I have a suitcase named Bob which is now down to 3 wheels (he's had a tough life) and while I still have him, Vinnie is basically a replacement. I have to know if you are talking about me and who you are....
 

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