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Walt Disney World in a motorized scooter?

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Nov 23rd, 2008, 05:32 AM
  #1
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Walt Disney World in a motorized scooter?

Has anyone experienced trying to get around WDW in a motorized scooter? I hurt my ankle and will be in a cast. We are going Dec 14, 15 and 16. Iím most worried about running into people and the scooter running out of power. How big are the crowds? Are there places to re-charge while you eat or while youíre on a ride?
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Nov 23rd, 2008, 06:57 AM
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I think you need to go to the official web site to get the official word on details. But I have seen people on scooters there.

I know you think crowds may be a problem - but I think a bigger one is that there are a lot of attractions that you can't get on/into in a scooter. Many require either climbing down into a boat - or moving quickly to get to get into a car on a quickly moving track. I know they can stop the track if necessary for slower moving people to get on - but if you leave a scooter at the entrance someone will have to go get it and bring it to the exit - often quite a distance away.

Obviously certain areas - with shows rather than so many rides will be easier.

But I would check the official site and disboards to get specific advice on different parks and activities.
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Nov 23rd, 2008, 07:31 AM
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Motorized scooters work well at WDW. They are available for rent at the park. You won't have a problem with battery life as they hold more than an average "full day" of power. If you do have some type of malfunction you can easily exchange the scooter for a new one (assuming you've rented from the concession at the park not from an off-site rental company). Lot's of disabbled and handicapped people use them so you won't be alone.

Many attractions and rides will let you drive the scooters close to the boarding point - the park has procedures for dealing with disable and mobility challenged patrons so it's not an issue. You'll be come well adapt at identifying and locating the "handicapped accessible" entrances to the rides, attractions, etc. withing 15 minutes of your arrival at the park. You won't miss out on anything simply because your foot is in a cast.

As far as crowds in the park, the number of visitors varies depending on time of year, specific days and time of days. During your scheduled visit in mid-December you won't be encountering 'peak crowds". Regardless the park has been dealing with "crowds" for decades and they are very good at moving people along. Crowds aren't an issue you need to be concerned about.

FYI - on those rides that you can access directly from your scooter and you board in one place and get off in another, the park staff will reposition your scooter. Siome attractions will require you leave the scooter in one location but there are procedures in place to take good care of you. There will always be a "Disney Castmember" (as the attendendants are called) to assist you. Go and have fun!!!!
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Nov 24th, 2008, 06:19 AM
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I'm not so worried about getting on and off every ride as we've been several time before and I realize my mobility is limited on this trip. I figure I'll just wait in a shady spot and people watch; should be fun actually.

I am reassured by your reply RoamsAround and have taken nytravelers suggestion to call WDW. They recommended 3 commercial companies, one of which has an office on WDW property, to rent a scooter for my length of stay. These companies deliver the scooter to your hotel and offer onsite service and support. Everyone I spoke said that people in the scooters get around very easily and that the castmembers are trained to be on the look out for people in need at all times. They made me feel like itís no big deal at all. The hotel, buses, restaurants and parks are used to dealing with this all day, everyday.

So, I got my reservation for the scooter and I'm feeling pretty good about going now. I'll post a little trip report when I get back. It should be interesting to experience the parks from this point of view.
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Nov 24th, 2008, 03:34 PM
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Please please please practice before you get to WDW. Driving a scooter for the first time at WDW is like a first time driver going onto the freeway at rush hour. If I were you, I'd first try a non-busy time at your local grocery store or Walmart, then try again on a Saturday.

Last time we were at WDW, a lady PLOWED into a trash can by the Peter Pan ride because she couldn't figure out how to stop. The time before that, a guy was having a hard time negotiating the turns in the queue and his wife's "help" was only making him more stressed. So Practice!
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Nov 24th, 2008, 08:03 PM
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My DH tore his Achilles tendon a week after he/we made conference/WDW reservations. We decided to go anyway since it was several weeks away. He was in a brace by that point and he rented a motorized scooter each day. He did use crutches to get on the bus and to the rental area. He only had one time...going up over a bridge after the Candlelight Processional to view the fireworks in a more prime location in Epcot where the scooter was not 100%. My DS and I helped with a little push and we were good. Park personnel were very accomodating and we were glad we didn't cancel the trip. If you're staying in the park, the busses have handicapped accessible platforms to load the scooter (if it is being dropped off at your hotel). I did not see any charging stations...we were instructed to bring the scooter back to any WDW rental place if we had any trouble. You might want to request a handicapped accessible hotel room...we found the room a little larger and easier for him to get around.
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Nov 25th, 2008, 05:25 AM
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LOL, missypie, that's what I was afraid of!

I have been practicing at Publix, they have the motorized scooters with a big shopping basket on the front. Saturday mornings are the busiest around here and I've been able to get around. I try my best to stay clear, but feel like some people are still bothered by me being in their way...oh well.

I'm thinking that's a pretty good idea, dsgmi, I will call the All Star Sports hotel today to see about a handicap room. Nice tip, thanks! Itís good to know this is going to work out and we shouldnít change our plans.
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Dec 2nd, 2008, 01:45 PM
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Just returned from WDW and my father used a scooter for the first time, from either CareMedical or Walker:

http://www.caremedicalequipment.com/wheelchairs.htm
http://www.walkermobility.com/products.php
http://www.buenavistascooters.com/products.php
http://www.mobilityequipmentrentals....wheelchair.htm

Some ECVs apparently can plug in directly, and in Animal Kingdom we saw a Cast Member helping a woman plug her chair to a receptacle while we watched the parade. My Dad's ECV used a separate transformer which he left in the hotel room. We only had issues with the charging on one long day (barely made it back to the hotel), but on most days we were back at the hotel for a while in mid-day and he charged it then.

There is a disabilities guide map for each park which shows for each attraction whether you can stay in your ECV (as you can for many shows, for example) or you have to transfer, and whether you go in the main queue or use a separate entrance. These maps are available near the main entrance of each park, or you can go to guest services and get the maps for all of the parks at once.

The Disney busses were very well-equipped to handle the ECVs. The larger boats (such as the ones that serve the Boardwalk resort area) will also handle it, but some smaller boats (such as the one that goes from the Polynesian resort to the Magic Kingdom) cannot accomodate the ECV (you have to ride the monorail on that route).

Crowds should not be bad on those dates.
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Dec 2nd, 2008, 01:48 PM
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Another tip--my Dad's ECV had a knob which was the speed control, separate from the lever on the handlebars that made the ECV go forward or back. Slowing down was key for travelling in the bigger crowds and for maneuvering on and off the busses and boats.
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Dec 3rd, 2008, 05:10 AM
  #10
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I booked online with Walker Mobility and they will have my scooter waiting for me when I arrive at the resort, which is super convenient.

Nice to know about the disabilities guide map, I will be getting those for sure.

Two weeks and counting...
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Dec 17th, 2008, 11:23 AM
  #11
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The scooter worked well and I was able to get around to most everything very easily. I was surprised by the number of other scooters and wheelchairs in the parks.

The power lasted each day for as long as I needed. I was able to re-charge in the Magic Kingdom and at Animal Kingdom. You really have to watch out for small children, but overall most of the crowds were kind and considerate.

All in all I would say that if you have plans made and something happens, you should get the scooter and go anyway. It worked out very well for me.
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