Tips for travel in New England

Old Aug 10th, 2000, 10:24 AM
  #1  
Rita Prothero
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Tips for travel in New England

We intend to spend about 6 weeks in New England from mid-October starting in Boston,hiring a car and flying back to the UK via New York.Would appreciate any advice on the route we should take,pleaces not to miss and perhaps recommendations on good hotels/motels to stay in.
Would be happy to reciprocate for info.on UK especially London and/ south west England.
 
Old Aug 10th, 2000, 08:19 PM
  #2  
Charles
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Hmm. I think the question is a bit broad for most of us to answer. The Time Out guide to Boston, which should be generally available in the UK, does an excellent job of covering Boston and suggesting places to visit in New ENgland.

Generally, the leaves should be beautiful that time, so it would be a good idea to visit Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. However, this is a very populaar time to go to thos states and reservations should be made well in advance. IN general 6 weeks will allow you to see a lot of NE and New York
 
Old Aug 11th, 2000, 08:28 AM
  #3  
Melanie
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One thing you might need to watch for: October 9 (Columbus Day) tends to be the end of the 'tourist season' in some parts of New England, so some places may be closed during the week. Many of the States have web sites, I know that Connecticut's is pretty good because I've been using to plan a trip in October myself.

What advise do you have for someone who wants to travel to South or West England in September 2001?
 
Old Aug 11th, 2000, 08:56 AM
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Simon
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6 weeks in enough time to see every corner of New England. You could plan on spending about 6 days in each of the 6 states and a week in NYC. Or you could even throw in New York State (Adirondacks & Hudson River Valley) and Quebec or Maritime Provinces in Canada.
Fall foliage will be on the decline in most places in mid-October - southern areas might be best to see first. Besides Columbus Day Holiday, Thanksgiving is November 23, Veterans Day is November 11 and the national elections are November 7. You should go to amazon.co.uk and order Frommer's Best Loved Driving Tours of New England and also get a Michelin Green Guide and map.
Each state and some regions within those states have websites and will mail you brochures. Also newengland.com is a good resource. Happy travels in Yankee territory!
 
Old Aug 11th, 2000, 09:18 AM
  #5  
Simon
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How could I forget Halloween - the best and biggest unofficial holiday! We do take it much more seriously here in the US than in the UK (or anyplace else for that matter). Salem, Mass., might be fun around that time.
 
Old Aug 11th, 2000, 06:11 PM
  #6  
Top
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raised for rita et al
 
Old Aug 12th, 2000, 04:00 AM
  #7  
CMcDaniel
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Rita, I have the same concerns as another poster regarding the coloring at mid-October. There will still be color in upper New England (Maine, NH, VT) but it will be well past it's prime. MA and CT will be OK. If you have the option, I would try to book flights for the 1st part of October, do northern New England first and work your way into southern New England as the color does.

Places not to miss (you have loads of time)--the coast of Maine (as far up as possible), Boston, Cape Cod, perhaps Nantucket, the Berkshires (MA)and villages of Stockbridge and Lenox, White Mtns of NH, Green Mtns of VT and the small villages you'll come across (Manchester, Grafton, Woodstock are some of our favorites), Newport, RI with it's "cottages" (actually mansions of the likes of the Vanderbilts etc, all open for touring now).

You can drive from Western MA to northern VT in the same amount of time it would take to drive from Oxford to the Lake District. It's quite a small area, but plenty of beauty. Hope you have the option of moving your travel dates to the beginning of October, rather than the end.
 
Old Aug 12th, 2000, 04:53 AM
  #8  
Donna F
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Yankee Magazine has some great tips. You can read them at www.newengland.com. Bed and breakfast places will give you the opportunity to share stories with other travelers and find out more local lore from your hosts. When we travel I buy the local newspapers to find out what small, local events might be scheduled. If you like history, then make sure you visit places like Sturbridge Village in MA and Strawbery Banke in NH. If you like scenery, avoid cities. I would give Portland ME, Portsmouth NH, Burlington VT my votes for great shopping intermixed with good restaurants. Concord NH is pretty good too. You can park the car for the day, wander around and take it slow. Vermont Country Store probably has the best gadgets and is a fun visit. But Concord NH has some great local gift shops plus the League of NH Craftsmen shop. The NH History Museum has a great gift shop. I would take a boatride someplace, whether it be on NH's lake Winnipesaukee or off the coast of Maine. You can choose small boats or big ones but the ocean is part of New England and you should see it from that angle. However, some may be operating weekends only after Labor Day in the north, or after Columbus Day in southern sections. In NYC visit Ellis Island. We also enjoy taking narrated trolley rides which allow you to get off anyplace and get back on. Great way to hear some local history. I hear raves about the Boston Duck Tours which use amphibious vehicles, but haven't been on that one. Walk thru NYC's Chinatown, Little Italy etc. A friend said her British relatives loved visiting American grocery stores. Have a great time.
 
Old Aug 12th, 2000, 08:36 AM
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arjay
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With six weeks, you might want to broaden your itinerary a bit....there's so much to see all over the east coast, and you'll have plenty of time.
We visited Shelburne Museum (Vermont) years ago, and enjoyed it. Perhaps someone here can offer a recent perspective. I'm sure it would come up in a search. The town of Concord (Massachusetts, not to be confused with previously mentioned NH) is charming, and boasts numerous literary homes - Louisa May Alcott (Little Women author - if you ever read it, it's a MUST) and Ralph Emerson among others. Thoreau, too, I think. We had only a short bit of time there, but i's high on my list for a return visit. Have a wonderful time!! (And bring plenty of jumpers-November could be pretty cool!)
 
Old Aug 12th, 2000, 05:16 PM
  #10  
dougd
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Rita, I live in the heart of Northern New England, on the New Hampshire/Vermont border. You are arriving a bit late for foliage, but there will still be plenty of it to see. The colors will peak in the northern parts of NH and VT about the last week of Sept or early October, and gradually spread south. Six weeks later will bring you into late November, a very cool and grey time of the year in the countryside. Bring some warm clothing, as there well could be some snow by then! I would spend the last part of the trip in Boston, starting from the northern parts of New England first. Here are a few tips -
Burlinton Vermont is a lovely small city on Lake Champlain. Try and spend a day or two here. In general, Vermont is more agricultural than New Hampshire. New Hampshire's mountains are generally more rugged. There are excellent hiking trails throughout central and northern new england, especially New hampshire. If you enjoy hiking, try and obtain a copy of '50 hikes in the White Mountains'by Daniel Doan. Try and spend a few nights on a farm b&b in Vermont. This can be an unforgettable experience. Other interesting areas of Vermont - Billings Farm Museum in Woodstock, the auto road up Mt Ascutney, and the covered bridge between Winsor Vt and Cornish NH. In New Hampshire, the White Mountains are spectacular (lots of tourists thru mid October however). The Connecticut river valley is a wonderful, unspoiled area of New Hampshire. Hanover has great restuarants and the beautiful Dartmouth College campus. As for Maine, the seacoast will be relatively uncrowded (and brisk!) by October. The towns of Ogunquit, Kennebukport, Boothbay, and Camden are very scenic. Warning, a lot of places may be closed down by October. Boston is a great city, try and stay downtown if at all possible. The Marriot Long Wharf is a big upscale hotel in a great location, right on the harbor. If you have any more questions feel free to e-mail me!
 
Old Aug 12th, 2000, 05:52 PM
  #11  
betsy
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If you can, how about spending a couple days in Montreal?? It's a great city. It's about an 1 1/2 hours North of Burlington VT. Also in VT, check out Stowe. Drive through Smugglers Notch and take the gondola up Mount Mansfield. In southern VT, Bennington is a neat stop. Check out the Bennington Museum and stroll around Old Bennington and the Bennington Battle Monument. Have a great time!!
 
Old Sep 25th, 2000, 07:24 AM
  #12  
mary
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Don't miss Newport and Rhode Island. TWo good websites are www.gonewport.com and www.oso.com. Email directly for Newport questions.
[email protected]
 
Old Oct 2nd, 2000, 08:32 AM
  #13  
jerry
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just got back from a more condensed trip. Started out on the Coast of Maine, Ogunquit, Kennebunkport not to be missed. Be sure to follow rt 1a along the coast for great sites. On to Boston. We took the advice of many on this site who rec'd against a car in boston so we stayed at a great place in Marblehead (Pleasant Hill) and took to subway into Boston. Very easy - 15 minutes away - the woman who owns Pleasant Hill very helpful with directions. Great dinner one night in Marblehead - Pellinos Sp?. Vermont and New Hampshire great experiences. Highly rec's Quechee/Woodstock area. We stayed at Kedron Valley Inn in Woodstock and loved it. Have fun.
 
Old Oct 2nd, 2000, 04:37 PM
  #14  
Carol
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Hey Doug -
Would you mind checking out my e-mail "Reasonably priced B&B recs?" I think you might have a couple of answers for me. Your description of hiking and knowledge of VT sounds like just what I'm looking for in a late October road trip to VT. Your message also makes me hopeful that the foliage tourist traffic may have lessened in late October. Thanks for any suggestions you might have.

Sincerely,

Carol
 
Old Oct 3rd, 2000, 09:41 PM
  #15  
Brian
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A place not known to many that offers a spectacuar view of Boston during the fall is Robbins Farm Park, in Arlington, MA. (off rt. 2)
Bring your camera.
 

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