Pennsylvania Vacation

Oct 2nd, 2005, 04:15 PM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 19
Pennsylvania Vacation

I am in the process of plannign a vacation to PA. We are looking to go for 10-days, possibly 2-weeks if we can swing it with vacation time.

We would like to really see the state. It will be a combination of a road trip & stop here for a couple days.

Just looking for some must-see spots that aren't obvious (I know what to see in Philadelphia), but what about the rest of the state.

Good Eats. Unique stops. Roads worth traveling. Etc.

Any help greatly appreciated!!!
jnhayes is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2005, 04:29 PM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 17,226
Based on your earlier toddler question, be sure to check out Thomas the Tank at the Strasburg Railroad Museum.
http://www.rrmuseumpa.org/about/thomas.htm

You may also enjoy Hersey, Penn and the chocolate aroma.

Amish country is lovely and interesting.

If you like Civil war history, tours or even quick stops of the battlefields will be interesting.

I am planning a trip to Frank Lloyd Wright's Falling Water in Western PA.

Some random ideas...
starrsville is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2005, 04:37 PM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 17,226
Wow! I'm learning a lot. I just googled to get more ideas and found a great website - www.familyfun.com

Under travel and Pennsylvania, there are lots of good ideas, including factory tours - Crayola factory tour in Easton.

Here's the link to several ideas -
http://familyfun.commerce.atomz.com/...q=pennsylvania
starrsville is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2005, 05:33 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 53
Depending on when you are coming, there is an amusement park near Phil that would be perfect for a toddler -- Sesame Place
rainbowfish is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2005, 06:19 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,380
Pittsburgh's worth a look. I've got an album with some shots at http://community.webshots.com/user/bookhall (2nd from bottom.)

Starrsville pointed out Fallingwater--definitely a must-see! And while in the area, catch the other home Wright designed--Kentuck Knob (aka the Hagan House.) The two are only a half-hour or so apart, and offer a delightful contrast. Fallingwater was done as a summer house (in the 30s,) and Kentuck Knob, designed and built in the 50s, was meant to be a year-round residence.
bookhall is offline  
Oct 2nd, 2005, 07:04 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,439
Dear jnhayes,

Good evening! Although I currently live in Chadds Ford, PA I grew up in Langhorne, PA (where Sesame Place is located) and theres a really cute area right around there called New Hope. Its got neat restaurants and cool and unique shops!

I happen to think Gettysburg and Valley Forge are pretty cool, also.

Its not my bag but theres always QVC in West Chester, PA-you can take a tour and stuff.

And I think you should totally go to Lancaster (Amish). I think the neatest part about that visit is when you take a tour of a farm and they show you how the Amish really live...There are shopping outlets and a bunch of homestyle places to eat around there, too.

Ive been sitting here thinking of the best "must sees" in Pennsylvania. I know you said for us not to mention the obvious attractions in Philadelphia but, just in case: Id for sure check out the Franklin Institute, South Street, and cheesesteaks at Pats and/or Genos, of course!

If you have any further questions please ask-Id love to help out!

Have a fun and safe trip!

Sincerely, Carrie in PA

NatureGirl19317 is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 01:48 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 3,525
Falling Water is not to be missed. While in western PA go to Johnstown. Two Flood museums are interesting and there is the steepest incline plane to ride. Johnstown is the location of the Johnstown Flood which prior to 9/11 was the location of the largest number of deaths from a single event (in the US).
SusieQQ is online now  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 03:25 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 7,472
It would really help to know what time of year you are going and what type of activities you enjoy. You've gotten some great advice so far. PA also has th Poconos if you like the mountains. Some cute towns up there like Jim Thorpe.
schmerl is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 08:35 AM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 471
As Schmeryl said, give us a few more details. Until then, consider PA State Parks - some give decent access to day trips. If you're anywhere near the Poconos, consider Centralia. It's a town near Rte. 81 that has been wiped-out by an underground coal fire. Weird but strangely photogenic and popular.
cheapbutnice is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 10:02 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 15,384
Not only can you tour a farm in Lancaster County, you can stay overnight there as well. This was really fun for my kids when they were little especially in the spring when there were newborn kittens and goats and other farm animals.

We stayed once in Mount Joy on a farm that took us on a hayride to the host's brother's dairy farm where we had a tour, and once we stayed in Strasburg on a Mennonite farm. The Starsburg railroad (an old steam train)ran right though the back of the property. I believe I found these through a publication of the state called "Farm Vacations in PA" or something similar. It is on the web now also.
Suki is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 11:13 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 40
Near the top of my suggestions would be Amish country (Lancaster), Gettysburg, and historical sites in Philly.

In addition ...

You could drive along Route 6 (across the northern part of the state (if you're traveling through the state in the fall for the fall colors).

In northeaster PA (near Rt 6) is the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon, if you like to hike and/or bike.

I'm most familiar with stuff in the Altoona/State College area (center of the state). In Altoona, there's railroad stuff, if you're interested in that, including Horseshoe Curve.

The world's oldest wooden roller-coaster (I believe) is at Lakemont Park (Altoona).

Penn State University is in State College. The Penn State Creamery (on campus) sells excellent ice cream.

Let us know what you decide and how it turns out. I've only lived in the state 10 years and have much to see myself!
TribeLeader is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 01:51 PM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 882
Talking of factory tours, the Herrs potato chip people have factory tours, there are also some pretzel companies too. Are you going in October? There is always the carp fish at Pymatuming to feed. Roadside America and/or Little Caboose Motel in Stratsburg, PA.

You have so much time I'd even suggest like others seeing/visiting Frank Lloyd Wrights Fallingwater and Kentuck Knob. All the PA State Parks have free admission. Since I live in SW PA I'd highly recommend Moraine and Ohiopyle State Parks. Moraine is on Lake Arthur and both have many hiking trails.
Stephanie is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 04:39 PM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,899
If you have any interet at all in trains, check out Steamtown in Scranton.
Depending on when you will be traveling, there is also a place called Montage just south of Scranton that has been developed as a recreation/entertainment compex with an outdoor amphitheatre. And if you do get to the Scranton area, be sure to check out Old Forge with all its family operated Italian restaurants.
Seamus is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 05:00 PM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 207
All of your suggestions have been helpful to me, as well. I'm planning a trip to western PA next spring so I am saving your ideas to research later. I hope we hear back from the OP soon!
Presocia is offline  
Oct 3rd, 2005, 06:04 PM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 882
Just a last suggestion. Go to: wqed.com. Then go to Shop prompt

Its a Pittsburgh website PBS station. Rick Sebak made several VHS tapes for the local Pittsburgh in the 1990s and into 2000s however he has 2 general PA ones. Try picking up Pennsylvania Roadtrip and Pennsylvania Diner VHSs and/or DVDs. It will give you an overview of diners and places to see as a road traveler in PA.
Stephanie is offline  
Oct 4th, 2005, 08:09 AM
  #16  
stevefrat
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
In addition to what others have suggested, do some research on Bushkill Falls and the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon in Wellsboro, PA.
 
Oct 4th, 2005, 08:11 AM
  #17  
stevefrat
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I see the PA Grand Canyon was mentioned. How about Peddlers Village in Lahaska, PA? It's not very far from New Hope, PA.
 
Oct 4th, 2005, 08:44 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 515
Hi jnhayes, As an artist and art lover, my suggestions will be colored (har har) somewhat but def Philly is great. Don't miss the historic stuff-listen for the ghosts of Adams, Jefferson, etc. as they hammer out our history! Great art museum in Philly.

Nemacolin is a pretty special (read 'expensive') place to stay if you go to Kentuck Knob or Falling Water.
There is a Andy Warhol museum in Pittsburgh if you are in that general area and like his stuff.

My fave is the Delaware Valley area and the Dupont homes (in Delaware sorry). Brandywine Museum-lots of Wyeths.

Lancaster area very interesting and picturesque. Amish quilts are pricey but beautiful collectibles. Food, food, food! Train ride.

Gettysburg is a gem.

Enjoy and please report what and where when you return.
donco is offline  
Oct 4th, 2005, 12:18 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 64
We went to Lancaster, PA in August. I was there for business but we went early and came back late. The Amish country was so pretty. We just drove around to many of the towns and just around the farms. They sell fresh fruit and veggies, homemade food (my husband liked the root beer and I liked the banana nut bread). There are many little towns to check out. There are tons of antiques in the area. We went to Adamstown early in the morning for the antique malls and found some stuff. We took a day trip to Gettysburg for the battlefields and Boyds Bear Country. My husband went to the train museum in Strasburg and the Harley factory in York.

For restaurants in Lancaster, we liked Good and Plenty, which had Amish food. We also tried Plain and Fancy, but it was bad food and lacked the character of Good and Plenty. We also liked Log Cabin (atmosphere was so unique) and Olde Greenfield Inn. All the restaurants close early in and around Lancaster (some close at 8 and others 9).

Hope this helps.
ufgator is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:29 AM.