peanut free flight

Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:52 AM
  #21  
 
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Hmmmm..cabin announcements...we all KNOW how everyone always obeys those don't we?

"Please be seated as quickly as possible....."

"Please don't leave your seat until the captain has turned off the seat belt sign......"

"Please stow things under the seat in front of you before using the overhead bins...."

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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:52 AM
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Wally - really? Even if you knew that it could kill someone. Your inconvenience vs. death?
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:56 AM
  #23  
 
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"Even if you knew that it could kill someone."

Quite candidly, if someone is so fragile that the possibility of peanut dust could cause death, maybe they shouldn't be flying.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 09:23 AM
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km4

I think this is going to be easier than you think...so don't worry too much. Certainly, anyone with small children is already sensitive to the peanut thing. There isn't a school in my district that allows peanuts...all lunches and all snacks brought to school must be peanut free. So, parents with young kids get it.

The airlines are getting there as well. United Airlines lists the food in its snack boxes on its web sites and mentions that there are no peanut products or peanut flour or oils in any of their foods. However, they may be manufactured in the same facility as peanuts. I don't know about other airlines but I am guessing they are similar.

Don't listen to the posters who suggest your kid not fly. As peanut allergies become more and more common it is just a fact of life everyone will have to address. These kids already have enough constraints on their lives...not being able to join their family in vacations or other family events shouldn't be addd to the list.

Good luck to you.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 10:14 AM
  #25  
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Thank you for your feedback interesting as it was. I guess I shouldn't have used the word "peanut free" but rather just not having the airlines serve the little packages with peanuts in them. It's not a big deal if crackers were served that were produced in a plant where there were peanuts. I bring all my child's food. It was mentioned in a posting that the dust that's generated from the opening of the package can circulate throughout the plane. Not a big problem if only a few people did it (as long as they weren't sitting next to you). But it does become a concern when there is 200 + people involved. And I know the airlines will not turn down a passenger because of this type of allergy. If that's the case then there would be a lot of discrimination going on and many folks who simply would not be able to fly because of disease or disability. In our society today we make a lot of accommodations for all kinds of disabilities. Like some of you out there, before I had my child with this severe allergy I would have looked at this situation much different, too. But here am today in the situation and see that it's not something to joke about.
I know we will end up just fine and have a wonderful vacation. Thank you to those who understand and gave positive feedback. We all have to enjoy life the best we can while we are here.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 10:25 AM
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Thanks for the research. I'm not surprised that the allergy incidence is quite a bit higher these days as I never remember it as a kid.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 10:37 AM
  #27  
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km4, the Captain of an airplane can discriminate as much as he wants because the FAA fully supports him.

There was an Ombudsman article in Conde Nast Traveler about a Captain who threw an entire family off a plane because the child had to fly with oxygen.

The Captain said because of the chance of turbulence, the flight crew would have to abandon their job of taking care of the other passengers to handle this one child with oxygen placing which would keep them from doing their job; keeping the other passengers safe.

Family had no recourse and it never even made it to court.

The airlines try and cater to the peanut allergies as a courtesy. No other reason.
 
Old Jan 26th, 2007, 12:27 PM
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I was on a flight (BA) once where no orange juice was served because a passenger had an extreme allergy to oranges . I have also been on a flight where peanuts were not served with drinks, for the same reason that a passenger had an allergy.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 01:44 PM
  #29  
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...then there is the "all nuts" part of the post.

First class generally serves mixed nuts to its passengers.

Make sure to bring some antiseptic wipes to wipe down the tray table and arm rests. Lately, I'm thinking this is a good idea for all of us, not just those with allergies.

Good Luck.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 01:54 PM
  #30  
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Didn't read any of the answers, cutting to the chase. Just spent about 24 hours on different Delta flights and they all gave us 2 packs of peanuts with our beverages. Not sure who, but other airlines give biscotti or pretzels.

Have you gotten a second opinion. The idea of airborn peanut scent affecting people is controversial.
 
Old Jan 26th, 2007, 02:15 PM
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I have to say that turning down a passenger because of a specific allergy and the chance that other passengers will not cooperate isn't quite the same as turning down a passenger with a disability that would not be significantly affected by what other passengers might, or might not, do.

I appreciate the clarification of the "problem" even if it was given after the fact.

Sometimes perceived "negative feedback" can actually be helpful if recognizing the possibilities presented ends up preventing an unfortunate mishap driven by misinformation.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 03:31 PM
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Having had a friend's child nearly die from airborne peanut "dust," I would say "controversial" only refers to people who are more dedicated to peanut butter than evidence.

And just to make it clearer, if you can smell something, it's only because tiny microscopic particles have reached your olefactory glands, stimulated them to recognize what you're smelling, and you call that "scent."

That's true of perfumes, skunk stink, anything you can smell. If you can smell it, something has entered your nose. If certain people "smell" a peanut, their bodies are already reacting to it as a toxin.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 03:32 PM
  #33  
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Not always particles, unless you're talking molecules -- but the principle is correct.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:10 PM
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This scares me.

How allergic is the child? Has it had reactions before that you have witnessed? How sick did the child get? What will happen if the child has a reaction and the epi-pen does not help?

The topic for me is not will an airline or other travellers try to accomodate this parent/child. The topic is what if the efforts fail (at how many feet in the air / time away from help).

Then what?

I don't think there is any way for an airline to know what other travellers have eaten or handled before boarding the plane.

Some people always have these type of snacks for hypoglycemia. Are they going to be accomodated with other protein snacks if they feel faint? If not, they may see their need as greater than someone many rows away.

What if people don't speak english and don't know what is being asked of them?

What if people don't remember what they ate or handled before the flight? Or what's in their carry on or handbag if they fly often.

I have called ahead and asked for wheelchair assistance for someone at the gate of a connecting flight. It never appeared. The gate agents at the arriving gate paged help. After a long wait, the person needing help (heart patient) decided to walk slowly to the gate to avoid missing the connecting flight. It was high stress for everyone involved. That time nothing terrible happened.

To the OP, I don't know how often you fly. However, I have low expectations that the airlines do what they are asked to do?

Many people don't know the details of this allergy and may innocently think the child will get something like stomach distress. They may see this as a matter of their discomfort (no food) or the child's discomfort.

People tend to be selfish when stressed (like when they have been treated like cattle all day while flying).

Please know exactly what the risk is to the child before taking any flights.

Please do everything possible to protect your child (things that you are able to control). Don't rely heavily on strangers who may not be as aware or attentive to the needs of your child.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:54 PM
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"you cannot bring food from home these days" People can't bring drinks/liquids from home - but in general, you can bring food on board.

Airlines will definitely try to accomodate you - but some passengers may not even know there are nuts in a snack or prepared food. Personally, I sure wouldn't risk it.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 08:36 PM
  #36  
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It's not a concern of mine what one has eaten prior to boarding a plane. That's not the issue here. And certainly I use wipes, as I do in restaurants, to clean the area in which we are seated. We took a short flight a few months back with our children and that's when I saw the peanut packages being passed out. A little panic did go through me but everything was okay. I had thought that they no longer served nuts on flights because the high incidences of this type of allergy. I am going to talk to our allergist further about this. He's the one that said it would be no problem to have the snack that the flight attendants pass out be something other than nuts. I don't care what people bring on or have eaten prior to boarding. I have never heard anyone say that my child should not fly because of this allergy. People who have bad hearts fly. Diabetics fly.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 08:47 PM
  #37  
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Sorry..I guess I'm trying to type too fast and hit the wrong key. Anyway, yes, if my child had an allergic reaction to nuts than it would be a very serious situation. We just don't know if it could happen or not if particles from nut dust were inhaled. The smell of peanut butter I know doesn't bother her. She's been around people who were eating peanut butter sandwiches. She just tested really high for this allergy. And I agree that you can't trust the airlines and probably that's what scares me most.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 09:01 PM
  #38  
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For those that are interested I found a website that has some useful information on flying with this allergy.
www.foodallergy.org/Advocacy/Airlines_Tips.html
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 10:11 PM
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We fly a lot and on a recent flight on NWA they mentioned they had a passenger with a peanut allergy and asked everyone not to eat any peanuts if they had them. I know NWA hasn't served peanuts in a long time but don't know what kinds of things are in their snack boxes as we don't have them. They are listed on their website tho. I think many other airlines do the same but I remember this incident as it was recent.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 10:42 PM
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Peanut allergies are difficult, however some airlines do have nut-free flights. In fact, some carriers are completely nut-free. Just call and ask. I think it was Delta that is nut free, but you should call first.

Also, you might consider bringing a N-95 respirator, which is a fancy word for a mask that doesn't let fine particles in. It's what is used for going into a room with someone who has tuberculosis. It won't do anything for contact with nuts, but an ounce of prevention...

Has your child's allergist recommended any sensitization treatments? How about carrying benedryl in addition to an epipen?

Good luck and have fun!
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