peanut free flight

Old Jan 26th, 2007, 12:20 AM
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km4
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peanut free flight

Has anyone heard of an airlines having a "peanut free" flight? My child is severely allergic to peanuts and all other nuts. We will be traveling this summer. The allergist recommended that there not be any nuts on the flight and that I could call ahead of time to request this. I will also be caring an epipen which shouldn't be a problem with a doctors note...I'm assuming but I will confirm that. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 12:29 AM
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I am not sure any airline is going to ban nuts entirely on a flight to accommodate a single passenger unless there are no nuts served in the first place. Of course, these days with airline cost-cutting a "no nuts" flight is probably more likely than it used to be. Let's hope the airline doesn't refuse to carry the child because of his condition.

I'd be very interested to see how successful you are in this effort so please post about what happens.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 02:01 AM
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I don't remember which airline this was, but several years ago I was on a flight and the FA made several announcements that the flight would be peanut free because it would be a serious health hazard for a passenger on board, and peanuts were banned even if you brought your own on board. I do remember the announcement being made more than once, and with a very serious tone. Wouldn't you know it, halfway into the flight the man sitting next to me took out a peanut butter sandwich and started eating. I pressed the call button and the FA came right over and scolded the man and made him either put it away or took it away from him (I don't recall). Good luck!
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 02:54 AM
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I was also on a flight where they announced that no peanuts would be allowed onboard. Also, I always carry an epi-pen with me when I travel. Now, I carry at least one in the box with the prescription label on it, but I've never been asked about it, even when I don't have the label.

For readers of this, please be aware that people with severe peanut allergies react even to the smell.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 03:08 AM
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I, too, was on a flight where this happened - probably either Delta or SW. The dust from people opening the packages can swirl through-out the cabin very quickly with the air system in the planes. Scary stuff for you, I'm sure. I am sure this is requested more often than most of us realize.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 03:46 AM
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I was recently on a Southwest flight and it was announced no peanuts (so we no had snacks whatsoever !) b/c of an allergy onboard.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 03:51 AM
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Read here for Southwest's peanut policy:

http://www.southwest.com/travel_center/disability.html

I found this by googling "peanut southwest air." I would recommend a similar search for other airlines you are considering.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 04:19 AM
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I'm curious about the genesis of peanut allergies. I never remember anyone having them when I was young.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 04:44 AM
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One of my friends children had a peanut allergy back in the 70's.

Now pediatricians tell parents "no nuts" (or shellfish) before a certain age to try and prevent the development of an allergy. Not sure how long they must be nut free, but our oldest grandchild is 18 mos and still can not have them.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 05:14 AM
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I read ther Southwest peanut policy and I think you should also.

the airline will not guarantee any flight as being completely peanut-free or allergen-free despite any announcements, etc., due to a variety of reasons to include what other passengers may end up doing, particles not removed by cleaning procedures, etc., etc....scary stuff.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 05:27 AM
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No airline is going to cater to one person. Some have nuts as snacks (and offer an alternative as SW does) and some don't. You can call the airline you want to fly and ask, but remember the rep can say one thing and the day of the flight the snack may be something else. SW will give pretzals to those who do not want peanuts. Aside from that I'd just buy some snacks once I got through security (you cannot bring food from home these days).

I doubt very much that any airline is going to guarantee that none of their 200+ passengers were near a peanut(s) on any given day .. let's face it, you can go into a dept. store and stand next to someone at checkout who had some nuts earlier and got "nut dust" on them. Heck, the kid could be at Disneyland and sit next to someone who just chomped down peants too.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 05:42 AM
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Buon Giorno buongiorno,

I looked on the internet to find the answer to your question. I don't think it is known for sure why the recent increase in peanut allergies, but are still researching. Here are a couple of theories:

The increased incidence of allergies of all types - including peanut allergy - has prompted speculation on their cause. Some scientists believe that the eradication of many infectious and communicable diseases may have affected the immune system. Others believe that improved hygiene practices also may alter the immune system and predispose individuals to the development of allergies later in life.
http://www.netwellness.org/healthtopics/ch/peanut2.cfm

The prevalence of peanut allergies has doubled in the 5 years from 1997 to 2002 according to research reported in the December 2003 JACI, and researchers donít really know why.

There is the thought that roasting peanuts, as we do in the USA makes them more highly allergenic versus boiling them as China does. Thereís also the possibility that pregnant and nursing women who eat peanuts are passing the proteins on to their infants which increases the likelihood of the child developing a peanut allergy. Lastly, there is the supposition that our too clean houses donít challenge our immune systems to fight off parasites, and instead they turn on themselves viewing a peanut protein as the enemy.

http://www.allergicchild.com/peanut_allergy.htm
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 05:55 AM
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"Our too clean houses"!!! Not guilty! roflmao

I'm astounded at the doubling of numbers in 5 years. Pretty significant!

Oh yes...peanuts are boiled in the south too...not just China! Perhaps they can test that theory by studying the prevalence of peanut allergies in the south compared to the rest of the US.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 05:57 AM
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km4, keep in mind that if you alert the airlines to your childs severe allergy, you take the risk of not being allowed to fly.

The Captain can deem your child a flight safety risk assuming he/she would have a reaction to another passengers nuts by having to make an emergency landing.
 
Old Jan 26th, 2007, 06:03 AM
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FWIW: Another explanation of the rise in peanut allergies is that peanut farming has included tinkering with the genetics of the crop as well as the development and use of pesticides and fertilizers, the result being a nut that is particularly toxic to certain members of our increasingly allergy/toxin sensitive population.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 06:08 AM
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AA will cater to one passenger if necessary. It has been an official policy that if a passenger requests a peanut free flight and backs it up with a doctor note, the airline will try it's best to provide a peanut free environment. Unfortunately the airline can't guarantee it as some paxs will do what they want to do.

Call the airline and explain your situation. I believe most if not all airlines have similar policy in force.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 06:22 AM
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Boiled peanuts? YES! No trip to the mountains is complete without a stop by the boiled peanut stand.

Back to the OP - I think it is great that airlines will deem a flight "peanut free". Kudos to them.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 06:28 AM
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Km4, My son also has a nut allergy but only when ingested. My nephew who is autistic has a severe allergy, touching or smelling nuts triggers it. When they flew home to Asia last year, my cousin told me that the airline was extremely accomodating. Calling them back several times to discuss precautionary measures, their needs etc. and yes there was an announcement on the flight. My nephew survived a 20 hour flight!

When you bring your epipen, I suggest you keep it in the original box with the prescription label. When I travelled with my son, I had a doctors note but the prescription label just made things so much easier. Less questions as they just copied the info from the prescription form.

Call your airline. I'm sure this they have the protocol down for this kind of situation. Good Luck and have a great vacation!
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 06:59 AM
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It's not just peanuts that the OP's child is allergic to, it's ALL nuts? I can't see how any airline could guarantee that all 180 passengers on board had no nuts, no muffins with nuts, no cookies with nuts, etc.
If the child is indeed SEVERELY allergic to all nuts, I'd only take vacations that we could drive to.
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Old Jan 26th, 2007, 07:37 AM
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I have heard that flight attendants will announce at the beginning of the flight, we have someone on board that is highly allergic to nuts, so please . . .

Just hope that everyone complies.

However, if it was an eight hour flight to Hawaii and all I had to eat on the flight was a peanut butter sandwich (American Airlines has pay for food on their flights, and they usually run out of $5 sandwiches) I would be tempted to eat my sandwich anyway.
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