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How to get considered for work in faraway city?

How to get considered for work in faraway city?

Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:19 AM
  #1  
Angelique
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How to get considered for work in faraway city?

This is my dilemma. I want to relocate to a more desirable city, located 2500 miles away. I've applied for tons of jobs there, most that I am more than qualified for, but haven't been offered a single interview. I think it's because they see on my resume I live far away. How do other people get around this? There are threads going that say, of course you have to get a job before you up and move to a new city, but how do you GET that new job when you live so far away in the first place?
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:28 AM
  #2  
Melissa
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I tried this a while back. I couldn't get an interview, basically, because I did not live in the city I wanted to move to. The next best thing is to schedule a trip/vacation to that city, and send your resume ahead of time with the dates you will be in the city, to set up an interview. That usually works as few people are willing to fly you over for an interview, no matter how good you are! Also, try ivillage.com or vault.com.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:34 AM
  #3  
xxxx
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Also, employers want to make sure that a person is interested in living in that location, and won't want to quit to move "back home" if they decide they don't like an area. In the cover letter, the better a reason you can give for your move, the stronger the ties you can show you have to the new location, the more likely it will look like you want to be there long-term.

For example, my spouse has been transferred there, I grew up there, I have family (no matter how remote) there, I have vacationed there for years and developed a love for the location, the new location is the center of my profession and I want to be in the midst of it, and so on.

And, as the previous poster pointed out, you have to fly out there. That also shows the extent of your interest in/commitment to the new location
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:38 AM
  #4  
a--z
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.
Have you tried working through a recruiter in your field? I'm in a networking group. One of our members recently got a one year contract position in Birmingham, AL (we're in Texas). In fact, she found the position using a recruiter that's based in Kansas --- I think the recruiter was Advanced Business Solutions.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:38 AM
  #5  
Lauren
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Hey I am a recent relocator as well. I knew that I wanted to relocate from the upper midwest to the southeast. I did some internet research and basically narrowed it down. I knew that I wanted to be in a city of at least 300,000 people but didn't care which city as long as it was in the southeast. You can't be too picky with the way the job market is. I searched internet job boards like monster as well as getting subscriptions or searching online the classifies ads in the cities where I was looking. I think what was most helpful was that I called a headhunter/recruiter who was local to each and every city where I was looking. I had telephone interviews with them and expelained my situation. As they were local to their particular communities, they had insight on the job market there as well as personal connection to the hiring departments. I will tell you that it is hard to find a job from far away if you are looking for a less professional type job. However, most jobs I was looking at were on the professional level and needed someone with a great deal of experience, they were recruiting nationally for these positions. . . . . .

Anyway it still took me several months. After about 4 months of sending out 25-30 resumes each week (about 500 resumes) not to mention numerous phone calls to recruiteres and head hunters, the interviews began to pour in and about 2 or 3 months later I got an offer which I expected. Obviously it takes a LONG time with this job market. Ultimately I took an offer in Charlotte and was then required to research this board a lot about living in the Charlotte area as the only time I had ever been there in my life was for the job interview. everything worked out great and people here at Fodor's are very helpful. It took a long time, but so far was worth it!
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 09:59 AM
  #6  
jobhunter
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If there's a particular city that you're targeting, you might want to get a PO Box at one of the local Mailboxes, Etc. They will give you a PO Box address at their facility and then you can have them forward the mail to you. Hopefully the companies don't bother to look at your postmark. You also need to be prepared to fly out quickly if you get an opportunity for an interview.

I've also had luck with stating in my cover letter that I'll be in their town within a stated time frame. Few companies will pick up airfare for interviews unless you have perfect skill levels.

I've found that most companies would prefer to hire from the local area. Too many people relocate only to find out that they are lonely or don't like the weather.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 10:13 AM
  #7  
suzanne
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Lots of good ideas here. Another option is to work for a temps firm. You can call and tell them your dilemma; I don't see why they wouldn't just ask you for your resume and do a phone interview. Being a temp can sometimes be a great way to get your foot in the door.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 10:28 AM
  #8  
a--z
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Angelique,
I need to correct my earlier post. The recruiting company is Advanced Business Consultants (NOT Advanced Business Solutions). ABC is headquartered in Kansas City. I'm not sure of all the areas they cover --- my networking pal was a technical writer for a telecomm company and they found her a position as a tech writer in the health care industry.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 11:10 AM
  #9  
the insider
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Angelique, send the hiring manager a fruit basket. It's sure to win him over.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 11:15 AM
  #10  
Job Hunter
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One other thing to pay attention to if you are searching internet classifieds or job boards. If the description of the position states at the end "Relocation Assistance Available" as many do, then that is a sure tip off that they understand you will not be a local candidate as well as a tip off that they are interviewing people all over. (Not too mention its a great bonus for you if you get hired!)
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 11:29 AM
  #11  
JobHunter
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I don't recall the last job posting that said they offered relocation assistance. I have very unique skills and am well educated and employers still don't want to pay for relocation if they think they can get by with someone local.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 11:41 AM
  #12  
Job Hunter
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Well we must be looking at different types of jobs. I have a law school background but am not a practicing attorney. I currently work in the complex insurance claims field as a claims handler who manages outside counsel etc. I search job boards daily such as monster.com and headhunter.net, there are Many job postiongs on therer that say some relocation assistance provided. This usually means they pay the moving costs for transposting your furniture but do not pay all cost associated with relocation. When I moved to Chicago for my current job, they paid ALL relocation costs including those associated with buying/selling home like closing costs, inspection fees and paid for me to fly out here for 2 days to do a househunting trip as well. I don't think companies are covering these things now, but yes many cover "some" costs of relocation. These advertisements are obviously looking nationwide for candidates and would accept out of state resumes.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 01:47 PM
  #13  
x
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i think i'd send out the resumes and in the cover letter indicate that you will be moving there in 6 weeks time. move there and make the follow-up calls. i think you need to be prepared to take a "interm" job or save up enough money that you can be unemployed for 6 months while you look for your idea job.
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 01:58 PM
  #14  
Lauren
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I'm not sure sapproach would work. With the job market the way it is, you really can't put all your eggs in one basket and concentrate on a single city. For instance, I did resumes to all major cities in the southeast: Atlanta, Nashville, Memphis, Birmingham, Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, Savannah and a couple of others. I couldn't send my resume and then just move there. I had no way of knowing which city I would be moving to until I got a job!
 
Old Jul 30th, 2002, 02:02 PM
  #15  
recruiter
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Perhaps I can offer some insight as a recruiter...

Unless you have skills that can not be found in the local market, employers will try to hire someone locally to avoid relocation expenses.

You may want to add a line on your resume that you are "willing to relocate yourself" or "no relocation assistance needed".

It will be tough in this job market.
 
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