Fall Colours

Old Jul 27th, 2002, 02:04 AM
  #1  
Cherry
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Fall Colours

Any states other than the east coast that are great for fall colours with mild Temp daytime 1st of Oct-14th.
Thanks Cherry
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 04:02 AM
  #2  
Mary
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What do you mean by "mild" temperatures? It is the change to cool, crisp, conditions that produces the glorious color changes in the leaves. Sheesh - it's amazing what some folks here have for expectations! Fall means cooler weather. If you're lucky, your visit may include a spell of Indian Summer...And, the most spectaclar foliage is in New Engand in the US. Or, you could try Japan.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 05:24 AM
  #3  
x
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Tsch tsch Mary, before you lambast someone, you need to get your facts straight.

Botany 101. As days get SHORTER trees know to get ready for winter by shutting down photosynthesis. The green chlorophyll disappears from the leaves and the oranges and yellows already present in the leaves begins to show through in the absence of the green. Red and purples are created when some glucose is trapped in the leaves after photosynthesis stops, and the combination of cool nights and sunlight turn this glucose into red or purple, but the precipitating factor even for those colors, is the cessation of photosynthesis in shorter days of fall. Now Mary, tell Cherry you are sorry....

The best of the fall colors are still New England, Cherry, but trees everywhere change at various times and in varying degrees of brilliance.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 06:11 AM
  #4  
John
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x, you got a reference for that sugar thing? I'm just a dumb zoologist, but I had to take a few botany courses along the way and understood it was the anthocyanins that produced the red/purple coloration, same way the carotenes and other pigments I've forgotten the names of produce the orange/yellow colors. (You are, of course, correct that shorter day length triggers the change.)
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 06:24 AM
  #5  
Suzy
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Sugar doesn't change color directly, of course -- I think it LEADS to the complex chemicals that are the colors.

If foliage change was determined entirely by day length, we wouldn't need all these questions and web sites that track the dates of change; it's also affected by temperatures and the previous year's precipitation. We all know that chemical reactions can be affected by temperature, right?!
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 07:07 AM
  #6  
John
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In the biosynthesis sequence that leads to anthocyanin, a glucose molecule binds to a leucoanthocyanadin molecule toward the end of the several-step process. These reactions occur routinely in living plants and I am politely questioning x's statement that red/purple pigments are a result of glucose being trapped in the leaf and, by inference, are not produced until the leaf "dies" in the fall.

The exact timing and intensity of peak fall foliage is indeed mediated by temperature and moisture, among other factors, that's why I used the word "triggers" in reference to day length in my earlier post.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 08:16 AM
  #7  
gc
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My hair's starting to hurt!
Cherry, fall colors are associated with cooler AND shorter days (for all you science types). Columbus day weekend will be peak somewhere in New England, depending upon weather. There are multiple foliage sites that will give guidance, do a google search and you will be overwhelmed.

The weather could be anything from beautiful, sunny, 75-80 to 25 deg. and freezing rain. I've got a great shot from the top of Canon Mtn. in Franconia notch NH two years ago, taken on Columbus day. On the mountain top, we were covered in 6 inches of snow, while in the valley, 3-4000 ft below, it is a beautiful panoply of brilliant color.

I assume you're from an area with predictably gorgeous, and boring weather. Here in New England, a 3 day notice of what's coming is luxurious. And in the mountain notches, each has its own microclimate and unique, local weather.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 08:31 AM
  #8  
x(displaced yank)
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Foliage change begins with shorter days, Suzy. That is what triggers the whole process. Photosynthesis is dependent on light and water and with fewer hours of daylight, and dryer fall days, the process slows, then chlorophyll is used up faster than it is produced. Gradually more and more of the carotenoids already present begin to show as the green fades, until only they remain. Yellow is the xanthophyll and orange the carotene pigments, present in plastids in the leaves.

Anthocyanins are in the sap, not plastids, and depend on the breakdown of sugars in the presence of bright light as phosphate in the leaf is reduced. Glucose is made in the leaves in the daytime, but trapped in the leaves by cooler night temperatures and it is from the trapped sugars that the red pigment, anthocyanin is formed--the exact chemical reaction is beyond my limited scope, however. You can take it from here. gt; The brighter the light during the fall, the greater the production of anthocyanins.

This is probably more info than anyone, including Cherry, was looking for. I only meant to correct Mary's common misconception, "It is the change to cool crisp onditions that produces the glorious color changes in leaves". No, the trigger for the procedure is the shorter days, not the "cool crisp conditions". Daytime temps can be, and often are, quite mild in early October Cherry, so head over to New England for the best of the show.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 09:51 AM
  #9  
xxx
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Hit the mountains of North Carolina (Asheville) for spectacular color and mild temps.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 10:26 AM
  #10  
Stephanie P.
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Cherry:

I don't think you'll find any significant leaf colors outside of the NE U.S. during the time frame you indicated. At Ohiopyle State Park (18,000+ acres) 60-70 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, PA, has it's peak around October 9th of every year. So I'd estimate that in Maryland's mountains, north of D.C., you may be able to see some color by Oct 12th-14th.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 11:07 AM
  #11  
carol
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we lived in tennessee for a few years and the leaves were beautiful about mid october. if you don't want to go to new england, try nashville then.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 11:10 AM
  #12  
Jason
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here are some leads:

http://www.freep.com/fun/travel/qger7.htm

http://www.great-lakes.net/tourism/fallcolor.html

http://www.calphoto.com/fall.htm

http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/fallcolor/color/

http://gorp.com/gorp/features/fall/fall.htm

 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 12:17 PM
  #13  
mike
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Michigan would be a non-NE location that suits your needs. Colors from all the hardwoods are great, especially with all the lakes and rivers we have. On a still morning/evening you get that mirror effect. Time it with the sunrise or sunset and it's even more spectacular.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 01:19 PM
  #14  
Gretchen
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Agree about the NC mountains--Asheville, Boone, Blowing Rock, Johnson City (Tenn.) or on down the Blue Ridge to Brevard, Waynesville. Mid-October is usually the peak although with our drought it may be a bit earlier this year.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 07:11 PM
  #15  
Katrina
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Have you thought about the southwest? Arizona and Utah are really beautiful in October--Utah definitely has more color change w/ the Aspens but both have warm days and cool nights.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 08:41 PM
  #16  
Sandy
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Tennessee and North Carolina are definitely considerations. I love Missouri as well. River roads around St. Louis are pretty, the Ozarks, Lake of the Ozarks, lots of great places and interesting sites. Keep watching scenic-america.com for fall color byways and updates.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 08:53 PM
  #17  
Leslie
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It would seem to me that any area that has trees (other than pine) will change color during foliage season.

I was in the Amish countryside in Pennsylvania during Columbus Day weekend a few years ago, and the trees were at peak color. It was a very pretty sight with the barns and farms.
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 11:27 PM
  #18  
Marla
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Why would you not wish to visit New England during the foliage season??? The foliage is positively spectacular 1-14th of October. Sure, it may be chilly, but it may also be warm and sunny. All you have to do is dress properly so as to be comfortable while out and about. What's your problem?
 
Old Jul 27th, 2002, 11:55 PM
  #19  
Trixie
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If you really wish to see the BEST foliage on the PLANET, bring a sweater, jacket, down parka, and come to New England. Some years, you'll only need the sweater, others, you'll be glad to have the down parka along. Either way, the fall foliage is unsurpassed in New England (not to be confused with the "east coast"). If you prefer mild Temp, you'll have to give up the foliage prospects. No matter, it's probably too late to book accomdations in New England for THIS Fall anyway. Too bad for you.
 
Old Jul 28th, 2002, 12:06 AM
  #20  
Janet
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Trixie and Marla,
Cherry has asked for locations OTHER THAN the east coast, what is so hard to understand about that? I can think of several reasons she would want to go someplace else (like maybe she is coming from another country, loves fall but has already done New England in autumn and now wants to try someplace different.) You two act like you are chastising her for trying to plan something YOU don't approve of.
 

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