You're Pronouncing These Wrong

May 7th, 2019, 11:03 AM
  #1  
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You're Pronouncing These Wrong

Are you pronouncing these correctly? Is there a food you think you always say incorrectly?

https://www.fodors.com/news/photos/y...gn-foods-wrong

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May 7th, 2019, 11:13 AM
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As a French speaker -- even one who grew up near Montreal -- I vehemently disagree with the Quebecois pronunciation of "poutine." I won't do it! French words ending in "ine" sound like "een," and I won't be convinced otherwise.

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May 7th, 2019, 11:44 AM
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I did pretty well actually. Surprised myself.
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May 7th, 2019, 12:23 PM
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I don't mispronounce any of them actually. Might be a function of growing up in California so all the Asian, Mexican, and SouthAmerican foods are sort of second nature. . . . "How else would they be pronounced?"

Poutine is a special case - since I avoid it I don't have to pronounce it
janisj is online now  
May 7th, 2019, 03:35 PM
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The only one I did not know was from the Phillipines... not my neck of the woods.

All the Mexican and Spanish ones were super easy.

But I do disagree with what you are saying is correct for: poutine, ceviche, and scone.
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May 7th, 2019, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by janisj View Post

Poutine is a special case - since I avoid it I don't have to pronounce it
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May 8th, 2019, 12:54 AM
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<<The proper pronunciation is “wuss-ta-shure,” but most Brits to just shorten it to “wuu-sta” sauce.>> Native English speakers do not mispronounce Worcestershire sauce. They pronounce it "wous-ter-sheer." They also don't shorten it to "wuusta", unless they are from a particular part of the UK, they shorten it to "wous-ter."

Any others you think should be on the list? We want to know!

"Rødkål med fløde" - Danes challenge non Danish speakers to pronounce this.
"köttbullar" - another one that is usually mispronounced by non Swedish speakers
Odin is offline  
May 8th, 2019, 04:36 AM
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Odin, "wous-ter-sheer" That is how I pronounce. Een is how we pronounced in BC. Yum, making me want some now. Pouring rain here in Ireland and we are ready to battle the rain to go eat. I doubt they have any curds.
'
Macross is online now  
May 8th, 2019, 06:18 AM
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maybe they say ceBeeche in Peru, but in Mexico they say ceVeeche
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May 8th, 2019, 06:23 AM
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Your suggestion that there is one, and only one, "correct" pronunciation ignores regional (and class) differences.

I grew up in SE England. I say "scone" to rhyme with cone. So does the rest of my family. According to my OED (Oxford English Dictionary) both the long "o" and the short "o" are equally correct.

I agree with Odin and Macross WRT "Worcestershire". And if you seriously think that "shire" is pronounced with a "u" sound you are pronouncing a lot of other things wrong. As part of a compound name it rhymes with "sheen". On its own, as in "the shires", it rhymes with "hires".

I don't have an Italian dictionary, but wikipedia gives three different pronunciations for "gnocchi": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnocchi

And would you quit with the bold text already? It's as bad as all caps.
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May 8th, 2019, 06:49 AM
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Almost no Americans pronounce most anything in the UK correctly. So a US published guide will likely be wrong more often than right.

Whether it is 'Wouster' sauce to basil, to yogurt, to vitamin, to tomato, to pasta, to filet . . .
janisj is online now  
May 8th, 2019, 08:02 AM
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Chorizo should definitely be on the list. I struggle to think of a food pronounced in as many different ways

"Almost no Americans pronounce most anything in the UK correctly.” I can’t disagree with that Janisj - a great list that I am sure could be expanded. Add to that the different names for the same foods - coriander v cilantro, aubergine v eggplant etc. and it is a wonder any of us end up with what we order in restaurants in each other countries...
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