Vacation versus Travel

Sep 3rd, 2019, 02:44 AM
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Vacation versus Travel

Thread on sharing info about travel made me think there is a difference between travel and vacation, starting with what you call it. Certainly some overlap, but I think of vacation as a relaxing break from regular routine - like a cruise, AI, cabin on a lake. Limited stress and work in both planning and while there. Travel is often not relaxing - there are always logistics and uncertainties to be addressed and location is often out of usual comfort zone. I think this might explain why some people go to the same cottage every year for 2 weeks in July - they may just need a break more than others. Plus may be more uncomfortable with unknown than others. For us, we enjoy both.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 03:02 AM
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Tourist vs traveler?
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 03:04 AM
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"...there are always logistics and uncertainties to be addressed" IMO those happen for both vacation and travel

Last edited by Dukey1; Sep 3rd, 2019 at 04:01 AM.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 03:35 AM
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“Explorer” please.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 03:47 AM
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Now that I am retired, vacation never seems right. Vacation from what? On the other hand, I never did "do nothing but relax" trips.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 04:22 AM
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Sometimes I need a vacation to recover from my travels.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 04:29 AM
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I get that Gail.

We go to Cuba most years in February or March for a week, last year for two. I call up the travel agent, he delivers the tickets two weeks before we go, bathing suits, dresses for dinner, five minutes to the airport, done. It’s s complete and total vacation. We go AI, and it’s the beach all day, every day.

This months’s trip to France will be anything but relaxing, we’re moving around a lot, the maps are on order, the gps is ready to go, and we’re starting to get together rough day plans. Parking, language, food shopping, day markets when and where, car pick up and drop off, train tickets, there’s just a lot more moving parts.

Like you, we enjoy both.

starrs, I don’t really think this is the old tourist v traveller question.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 04:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Dukey1 View Post
"...there are always logistics and uncertainties to be addressed" IMO those happen for both vacation and travel
That was a HUGE edit!
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 04:38 AM
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"This months’s trip to France will be anything but relaxing, we’re moving around a lot, the maps are on order, the gps is ready to go, and we’re starting to get together rough day plans. Parking, language, food shopping, day markets when and where, car pick up and drop off, train tickets, there’s just a lot more moving parts."

Yeah, sounds like the typical trip in some ways. Once you get there does it ever "rise" to the level of relaxing? Do you ever look back on it and feel it was as satisfying as the trips elsewhere? Perhaps more so because of the preparation? As they say, "just asking..."
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 04:46 AM
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I like to travel during my vacation. If I stay home, I don't really feel like I've properly vacated.

These days I'm meant to take holidays and now I'm not clear if travelling will also take the place of a holiday as it does a vacation. I already get confused if our holiday falls over Christmas or Easter... which are also holidays (holy days) even if you work. Further, I'm not a fan of calling travel to the beach OR to Paris being referred to as a holy day, no matter how long I've been praying for it to come. And I fear someone might get on a plane and inadvertently cancel Christmas.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 05:14 AM
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Even if I'm not working, time away from home doing pretty much nothing is a vacation. But it does have to be away from home. For those two or three weeks we vacationed with friends every second year in the OBX we pretty much did nothing. Nobody did laundry, we took turns cooking and cleaning up after meals, there was no housework or gardening work. No obligations. If you wanted to make your bed, you did. If not, you closed your bedroom door. Days were spent lazing on the beach, evenings meant reading, music, talking, napping, games. Even if I'm not working, a vacation at home is not like this.

Travel is a different thing altogether. Lots of prep and planning and scheduling. Lots of walking, lots of getting places on time, lots of busy-ness, although we did make a deal years ago that we wouldn't get up early unless there was something we absolutely had to be at on time in the morning.

For various reasons, we haven't done those OBX vacations for years but I really miss that ability to totally relax for a few weeks -- something I can never seem to manage at home.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 05:29 AM
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We used to go to Bull Shoals Lake on the MO-AR state line, where we'd camp for a week. Fish, swim, cook on the fire. I guess that's sort of what we're calling a "vacation"?

As opposed to going further from home and... sightseeing? (that would include museums, castles, churches or whatever)

Our version of the latter doesn't really cause us more advanced work than my parents put in getting the gear and the boat ready and making sure camping spots in the park weren't all booked. Plane tix and the first hotel are sometimes all we plan.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 05:30 AM
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OK, I'll stop by assuming those trips to the OBX didn't involve any advance prep, any decisions as to when and exactly where to stay, no scheduling of the trip itself, no walking, no decisions about where to eat tonight or what to eat IOW it just happens.

Sorry for getting nit picky
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 05:40 AM
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We stayed in the same house every time and booked it through the same real estate agent. Each couple traveled on their own so we all made our own 'getting there' plans. For us, that meant stopping at a Red Roof Inn overnight which required no reservation.
"Planning" meant deciding which weeks we were going and even then it was almost always the last two weeks in August because the last week was lower priced.
Did we decide what to have for dinner or where to go when we went out? Of course. And lordy, what hard work that was! I also decided what book I was going to read and actually carried it and my cup of coffee out to the lanai every morning. OMG, the stress!
You're not getting nit-picky. You're getting silly.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Dukey1 View Post

Yeah, sounds like the typical trip in some ways. Once you get there does it ever "rise" to the level of relaxing? Do you ever look back on it and feel it was as satisfying as the trips elsewhere? Perhaps more so because of the preparation? As they say, "just asking..."
These trips never rise to the Cuba relaxing level, but they’re not meant to. We’ve learned along the way to only have one long driving day. Cafe time, poking about time, looking at the sea time, not rushing out by 9:30 time, all those types of trips have been very satisfying, and the pre prep is a huge part of that. We’re very, very good at relaxing into the minute and not worrying about where we have to get to next. Is this what you’re asking?
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 06:04 AM
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Right now we are on Cape Cod in our 2 week timeshare overlooking the beach. This started 18 years ago as (mainly) my husband's vacation from his demanding job. We have continued it into retirement and post cross country move to CA, even though the original need/motivation is no longer present.

While I love this area, for me it is not the same "vacation" as it is for him and that makes me think, in response to you, that for some people travel can sometimes be more of a vacation. I guess context and perspective are everything.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 06:20 AM
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I use vacation and travel interchangeably. If I am away for an extended time, it means I am on vacation or traveling, regardless of whether I am going to a beach for a week or visiting a city.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 06:22 AM
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I think of all time away from home, regardless of destination or activities, as a trip.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 06:29 AM
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For me, it's not one or the other. All trips are a mix.
I used to take a trip and try to fit everything in. About 20 years ago, my partner decided in the middle of the trip that she wanted to sleep late. And then later. And later. She wanted to rest. She needed to rest. I was virtually vibrating with unused energy, but more than that. I thought I was SUPPOSED to be up and going and stressed about "losing" an entire day of vacation. I was extremely stressed until noon and when I finally "got it" that she wasn't getting up any time soon, I got back in bed and rested too. She finally got up in late afternoon. We wandered around Durango and ate at a Thai restaurant. It has become one of my favorite vacation days ever. I remember the sleigh ride from that trip but not a lot more.

That day broke a (for me) bad habit. Since then, I've mixed in "lazy" (to use a now deleted word) days along with busy days. I schedule at least one day to be still and just enjoy BEING wherever it is we are. Now I feel cheated if busy trips don't include down time. My favorite place to be "lazy" is in Paris. It's familiar enough I know there are unlimited new things to explore but I don't feel bad about spending hours doing a whole lot of nothing. Well, "nothing" = enjoying being in Paris.

Cruises and AIs do not appeal to me but I do love trips that are based in the mountains or on a beach and there's lots of time to relax but lots of time to explore and discover new things.

Re the other discussion topic = planning/ prepping
Planning a trip, especially to a new location, is as much fun as actually being on the trip. For me, it's a high. I love the research. I love the discovery of options. I love everything about it. It's not "work" at all, but a joy. But I'm not the type to worry for hours/ days/ weeks about the choices. I trust my choices. I'm not much of a second-guesser so planning is not very stressful to me at all.

Last edited by starrs; Sep 3rd, 2019 at 06:42 AM.
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Sep 3rd, 2019, 06:53 AM
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I definitely agree about the "just being there" part as well as the planning. Yes, the latter can be frustrating and even disappointing but it is part of the overall picture and experience IMO.
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