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How to carry Nikon D300 while walking: loose, bag, what works?

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Aug 8th, 2009, 12:29 PM
  #1
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How to carry Nikon D300 while walking: loose, bag, what works?

I hate to have my camera out, lens attached, hanging from my shoulder I also don't like it inside a clunky bag. There must be a better way to keep it close, ready, protected?

Okay all you SLR Nikon and Canon folks.. what works for you?

Any other tips welcome. Thank you
LongLegs is offline  
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Aug 9th, 2009, 07:12 PM
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Your best bet is to get one of those SlingShot type pags. They're the ones where you can rotate the bag from the back to the front of you to easily remove your camera without having to completely remove the bag from your body. I have the Lowepro SlingShot 300AW but there are different brands also. They're not really ideal for long trek, because one shoulder will bear the brunt of most of the weight. Needless to say, the less weight you can put in the bag the better. However, I'd rather grin and bear the discomfort of wearing the slingSHot than have to deal with the clunky way of having to completely take my bag off my back everytime I need to take out my camera.
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Aug 9th, 2009, 09:11 PM
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Axel, I just bought that bag for my China trip. I hope it works out for me.

I just want to mention to everyone who has a factory strap -- get rid of the factory strap that is advertising your camera!! You're just asking for someone to steal it. (i.e. if it say D300, D90, etc.) Get a generic strap so you aren't advertising "steal my nice dslr". Just my 2 cents.
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Aug 10th, 2009, 04:55 AM
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I hope it works out for you BeacGirl247. Have a great time in China.

Two things I wish I could change about the design of the bag: (1) When you rotate the bag to the front of your body, the small compartment at the top of the bag and the smaller one on the front are kind of awkward to retrieve stuffs from since they're designed to be access from the upright position, and (2) I wish there was a way to strip a small tripod to it. There is a loop on the side that I've stuck my tripod leg through before but it gets kind of clumsy.

Having said that, If you need to access only the main compartment when your bag is rotated to the front then you'll be fine. And you might need to switch shoulders once in a while if you've been trekking with it for a while. I think you'll find the bag very convenient travelling in the city and crowded place though. I sometimes walk around with the whole thing in front of me if I'm concerned about someone trying to steal stuffs from it.

Note: Please remember to completely zip everything up before rotating the bag back to your back. The zippers for the main compartment go arond 3/4 of the bag, so disaster can happen if you don't remember to completely zip it up.
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Aug 10th, 2009, 08:21 AM
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We have a basic camera case that I find very functional. When I took it out I realized although it is not a SlingShot bag, it is made by the same company. Look at their website: lowepro.com, there are many choices, we have the ZoomLens 1. It is very light weight and is pretty much the size and shape of your camera so it's almost like not carrying a case.
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Aug 10th, 2009, 08:42 AM
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Well, I don't shoot Canon or Nikon, I shoot Olympus but will answer anyway.

I have a number of camera bags for different situations. I have had the Lowepro Slingshot, but found it didn't work for my (female) anatomy. However, I know some women who have one and it works for them. It's one of those bags you really need to try on in the store.

I also have a Crumpler 5 Million Dollar shoulder bag that is a good walk-around bag in urban settings. I have a Lowepro Fastpack which has the same side access as the Slingshot but is a back pack. You have to slip one of the shoulder straps off to rotate the bag but it's very doable. I also like the larger top section of the bag for lunches etc. when I'm out on a day hike.

And I have a Topload Zoom and individual lens bags for when I want to go minimal or need to put them in a much larger bag.
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Aug 10th, 2009, 06:46 PM
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Thanks for the link to lowepro debsnj. I like its TopLoader ProAW bag. I can carry my camera in front for easy access while carrying my normal backpack on the back for long trek. It straps over both shoulders so it seems more comfortable, load-balance wise, than the SlingShot.
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Aug 11th, 2009, 10:26 PM
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Thanks! Went on Crumpler.com and that's a wild ride for a site. Wrote them and they replied:

I can suggest two things. The Whickey and Cox or the Sinking Barge. Both are great travelling bags with customizable spots for photo gear and a 15" laptop. Depending on how many changes of clothes you bring, you may want to look at the 17" bags since they tend to have a bit more room for the extras.
Those are The Karachi Outpost and the Customary Barge. Both are one size up from the first two suggestions. Let me know if you have any other questions and hopefully this helps!

Well, that would set me back more than I want to spend.

I have the Lowenpro and that's a great bag, but too big for just schlepping around Athens on a hot day.

So, I went to REI and found a bag, Osprey brand, for about $80 that might work. I will test it out. Of course this entire issue of how to make carrying around gear is going to always depend on so many factors...

But hey, maybe I'm missing some other thoughts out there.... ??
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Aug 12th, 2009, 05:06 AM
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On long trips I just use my Tamrac Expedition 5 back pack. It can carry my Pentax and all the lenses I need including the Bigma, and is carry-on legal for most airlines. My tripod straps on the back (though it gets packed in my suitcase for flying).
I have a smaller bag I use when I only want/need a couple of lenses locally.
The weight of a bag empty is a major consideration for me, as I am soon carrying several kilos of gear around, and I am not a body builder, nor do I have a Sherpa to carry it for me . Also some airline have a strict weight limit on carry-on and you don't want a bag which weighs 3kg when the weight limit is 6kg!
You need to consider what lenses you will be taking with you, and what lenses you are likely to be taking with you in the future, so that the bag will accommodate those too, rather than having a fine selection of camera bags in the house, most of which you won't use.
The main reason for changing camera straps is not for the advert on the one that came with the camera, but for comfort. The ones that come with cameras are generally not very comfortable. Anyone can see you have a DSLR without needing to read your strap.
There are a huge number of bag manufacturers out there. Have a look at http://www.bhphotovideo.com/ for a huge selection.
I recommend however that you actually go to a shop with your gear and try several bags to find which one suits you best.
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Aug 18th, 2009, 07:57 AM
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I have just ordered the Pretty Bella from Crumpler. I decided to treat myself to a camera bag which doesn't look like one. It is a shoulder bag, and more feminine than most camera bags.

It was dispatched to me within an hour of my ordering it, so I hope it doesn't take too long to get to me from Germany. I expect it will take a couple of days.

http://tinyurl.com/mhlf3l is a link to the Dutch site (in English.) I'm not sure if this model is available in the US.
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Aug 18th, 2009, 11:18 PM
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I was ALMOST going to get a Crumpler, but settled for what I believe to be a slightly better solution, namely because it can be both a shoulder and sling/swing to front camera bag... plus has a tuck-away waste strap for stability, if I need it.

TAMRAC, Velocity 7x. I paid $75.

I also added a Water Bottle in a padded carrier for $20 that attaches.

There's plenty of room inside, lots of options for padded sections, comes in a variety of colors ( I chose dark blue and gray).

Ultimately it will be necessary for me to schlepp my gear AND not get a shoulder ache which is why I went with this model and also found it to be a bit less camera-baggish as the Lowepro.

See you on the upside!
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Aug 20th, 2009, 01:42 AM
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I looked at that one too LongLegs. It was tempting, but I liked the girly looks of the Crumpler. I like your choice of colours though, less "camera bag" than normal.

The Crumpler will always be my second bag, my Tamrac Expedition Backpack being my bag of choice. Sadly it is too big to take as hand baggage on my upcoming trip to Ireland, so I wanted a smaller bag for that. No way I am risking having to check all my gear.
I should have had my bag yesterday, but I missed the delivery man, so I am hoping he gets here soon with it today.
Have fun with your new bag. I hope you get to take lots of great photos .
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