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Picture Perfect Peru: 4 Weeks of Slow(ish) Travel

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Dec 2nd, 2018, 05:32 PM
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Picture Perfect Peru: 4 Weeks of Slow(ish) Travel

Most of our travels as a couple have been to Southern/Central Europe where we know and love the food, the wine, the culture, the history, and the art. Whenever we discussed visiting other destinations it always came down to how much we love Spain or Italy and that was the end of it, off we went yet again back to our familiar playing fields. So it happened that this past April, that we were happily sipping some Tinto de Verano at a sunny restaurant terrace in Málaga when the ‘next trip’ discussion came up. We were in Spain, so we were not in the deep throes of missing all things Spanish. I guess that helped to finally shift things around.

‘We should do something different, there are so many nice places we should go to. And also there was the fact that a milestone birthday was coming up for me, I should cross something off my bucket list after all….’

And what was a the very top of my Bucket List? The Inca Trail and Machu Picchu. We committed to Perú. But during the planning phase I kept having mixed feelings and second guessing our decision. I think it had a lot to do with the fact that Peru was a challenge to our normal travel style as C stated from the get-go that renting a car and driving ourselves around was out of the question. I agreed for several reasons: (a) the distances are LONG, (b) altitude makes us very sleepy, (c) every guidebook counseled against renting cars, and (d) Peruvian driving is on a league of its own. And once you give up on independent transportation, the level of complexity increases exponentially.

I was excited about the things we would see but aligning everything into a sensible, logical sequence that considered fairly reliable transport options was a challenge! My home office was plastered with maps, guidebooks, post-it notes, color coding arrows, and spreadsheets. Trip Reports in Fodor’s were great (thank you kja!!!!!!) but few and far between. Yet, deep down I was somewhat worried that Perú would just not be ‘enough’. That it would be a lot of effort but would just not dot all the I’s and cross the T’s for me. I mean, as a destination it wasn’t as glamorous as Paris or full of Renaissance art like Florence… it was different; unfamiliar.

Let’s lay that one to rest right away: I (we) absolutely LOVED Peru!

This country has everything! Enough cultural and historic heritage to satisfy the most demanding scholar, natural beauty to fill an artist’s eye for decades, outdoor adventures to keep all sorts – from mall strollers to ultra-athletes- entertained, and fascinating flavors to drive enthusiastic foodies into nirvana. EVERYTHING! I have over 5,000 pictures taken over 28 days. The colors and images are unbelievable! Peru is simply so picture perfect that it will make a great photographer out of anyone that makes even a half hearted attempt to capture its spirit.

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Some background info on us: We define ourselves as ‘value’ travelers. By this I mean we are not on a backpacker budget, but we are not five-star resort people either. We do not want to do 3:00am flights anymore and we could not muster enough enthusiasm to get on an overnight bus. Food is important. Very important. But, eating from street vendors, hole-in-the-wall joints, truck stops and mom & pop shops holds almost as much appeal to us as fine dining experiences.

Wine is just as important; though we are not picky/demanding drinkers, we just like to sip on a nice glass and watch the world go by. Sometimes it’s more about café culture than about what we are actually drinking. We are not shoppers. If you are looking for shopping advice this is not the trip report to read. I bought a hat and a scarf at a textile coop we visited. End of shopping.

After Greece, Peru has been the most physically demanding destination we have visited so this is pertinent: C is 72 physically able but self-declared ‘retired from adventuring’ and ‘not needing to see the view from the top everywhere anymore’. I’m 49 and reasonably fit, now I get to go to the top and report if it is worthwhile for him to come up, lol. C had concerns before the trip about dealing with altitude as he has had some difficulties controlling his blood pressure. Aside from minor digestive issues, he was perfectly fine. We drank a LOT of coca tea, not sure if it helped but we both enjoyed the taste, so whatever. Placebo effect maybe.

I’m born and raised in Puerto Rico so Spanish is my mother tongue. C has lived in PR for 20+ years so he gets by in Spanish. Language was not a problem for us so I’m unable to say if it would have been as easy for non-Spanish speakers. Not all tour/transport operators spoke clear English, sometimes even I -knowing what they were saying from the dual language presentation- had a hard time understanding; it was a hit or miss.

My sister joined us for a week. She and I did the 1-day Inca Trail with Alpaca Expeditions.

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Since I’m notorious for abandoning long trip reports, I’ll just go ahead and provide the highlights before getting into the details:

Dates: October 31st to November 28th – We had very few bright sunny days, but the weather was kind to us. We had a some fog but it did not really hamper any of the experiences. In Machu Picchu we got fogged in but we also got sunny breaks. I loved my dreamy, foggy pictures as much as the bright ones.

Lima: 3 nights at 3B Barranco B&B. Loved it and actually preferred this location to Miraflores. I know, a few of you will say ‘I told you so. You were right.

Ollantaytambo: 4 nights at Sol Natura Hotel, great hotel and awesome room with a wonderful view. We loved this town so much that we did not feel like 4 nights were too long. We acclimated, waited for my sister to join us, and toured the Sacred Valley.

Aguas Calientes/Machu Picchu Pueblo: 1-day Inca Trail hike to Machu Picchu (hike only for sis and me; C will go straight to the hotel) and night spent at La Cabaña. Noise insulation at the hotel was non-existent but the bed was comfortable, the room was warm enough, and they did not run out of hot water when 12 stinky and sweaty hikers checked in at the same time. But after that hike I could have slept anywhere.

Cuzco: 4 nights at El Andariego, we really enjoyed Cuzco. The location of the hotel (once you get past the fact that it is two courtyards away from the street and the first one is a bit shady) is convenient for sightseeing and it is in the flat part of town. Liked our room very much but it got a little too cold on the first night because we did not figure out the heat out before crashing in. We did not even come close to running out of things to see in Cuzco. So yes, 4 nights was good for us, and I could have easily used 5.

Puno: 2 nights at Mirador del Titikaka. I cannot say enough good things about this hotel (well, C’s food on the 2nd night was barely edible but everything else was awesome). Loved it! Could have almost skipped that Disnyesque trip to Uros island and just stayed put to enjoy the marvelous views and extensive property. They even have a small alpaca herd.

Colca Canyon/Yanque: 3 nights at Killawasi Lodge. I wish I was there right now. It was breathtakingly beautiful, and the people bent over backwards trying (and succeeding!) to please us. I could have stayed another night to just lazy around, eat, and read. LOVED it.

Arequipa: 3 nights at Palla Boutique Hotel. Great little place! The room was comfortable. Many of their rooms face the interior courtyard lobby and I’m not sure if there is a/c. The view from the hotel terrace was awesome. I thought 2 full days in Arequipa were just about perfect. Visiting the Monasterio de Santa Catalina is worth a trip to this city by itself.

Trujillo: 3 nights at Paraíso Hotel Trujillo. Latam gifted us with a 5-hr delay in Lima for our flight to Trujillo so we were not in the greatest mood to start. Getting stuck in the small elevator with the bellboy did not help much to improve it either (he was more upset about this than we were). This immaculately kept hotel begins to look a little dated but it was serviceable. It took forever to get hot water in the shower but my perseverance was eventually rewarded, sadly after countless gallons of waste. The Huaca de la Luna and Chan Chan… OMG!!!! Go to Trujillo if you have a chance.

Lima: 1 night at Tierra Viva Miraflores Mendiburu for repositioning. Nice, new hotel and close to lots of restaurants and the seaside walk.

Paracas: 1 night at Hotel Riviera Inka Paracas after a Nasca line overflight from Ica airport, a visit to Huacachina and riding on the sand dunes. Loved the experience! The hotel was just a notch above backpacker level, but it was clean and had plenty of hot water. Sound insulation was non-existent. We used Nazca Flights/Jonathan Green for this transport/guide/flight package and we were very happy with them. In the morning we visited the Ballesta Island AM (highlight!) and the Paracas Reserve PM before returning to Lima.

Lima: 2 nights at Tierra Viva Miraflores Mendiburu. At this point we were both having digestive issues, so I think that we were done and ready to go home. But I think that I would have preferred to have stayed in Barranco instead of Miraflores.

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I’ll also list upfront the operators we used:

Taxidatum: Lima airport to Barranco and Cuzco airport to Ollantaytambo. Seamless service

Alpaca Expeditions: My sister and I did the 2-day Inca Trail/Machu Picchu with them and they also took care of C’s transportation and entrances to the park. Loved them, highly recommended.

Inka Express: Bus from Cuzco to Puno and I actually found it to be enjoyable with the touristic stops. Even the included lunch was acceptable.

: Recommended by the hotel. We went to Uros and Taquile Islands with them. Operator was fine, we just did not love the destination. More on this later.

Colonial Tours: This operator was chosen by Killawasi Lodge to transport us from Puno to Yanque and then from Yanque to Arequipa. It was smooth (though I confirmed everything about 25 times) and the experience was good as well.

Moche Tours: We used them two times in Trujillo at the hotel’s rec. One day was much better than the other but both were adequate. Only in Spanish.

Nazca Flights: Not the cheapest option but they offered exactly what I wanted. They combined a whole bunch of operators and commercial buses but it worked great. They hand-held us way more than was necessary.

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Now that the basics are all there, I’ll get started with the story.
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Dec 2nd, 2018, 06:37 PM
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I’m glad Alpaca worked out. Their owner is an absolute marketing/service whiz.
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Dec 2nd, 2018, 07:29 PM
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Sounds like a lovely trip! I’m glad you found my TR helpful, and especially glad that you enjoyed the Mirador del Titikaka. Peru is a delight, isn't it? Such diverse elements to enjoy.
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Dec 4th, 2018, 05:54 AM
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Great start marigross looking forward to reading more!

"3B Barranco B&B. Loved it and actually preferred this location to Miraflores. I know, a few of you will say ‘I told you so."
- I told you so!
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Dec 5th, 2018, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by crellston View Post
Great start marigross looking forward to reading more!

"3B Barranco B&B. Loved it and actually preferred this location to Miraflores. I know, a few of you will say ‘I told you so."
- I told you so!
Yes you did! LOL
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Dec 5th, 2018, 05:46 PM
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Day 1: Getting There and Some General Thoughts

We had a long boring travel day, the best kind of travel day. Well, a short boring travel day is better. But I digress from the beginning.

We left home around 6:00am to hitch a ride with one of the neighbors. SJU to MIA was slightly -as usual- delayed but not alarmingly so. Though it’s an airport we generally avoid, Miami seems to be finally getting somewhere with their endless renovations. Except that when we came back, we found that there was no ‘transit’ option after customs (just for the bags) and we had to fully exit the terminal and go through the full security line. Still, one can have Cuban coffee and semi-decent croquetas at Café Versalles.


I’m a layover chicken so getting to Lima was an all-day affair. We finally landed around 9:00pm in Lima. Breezed through immigration. I had repeatedly read that in order to avoid the IGV tax in hotels, as a foreigner, one needed (in addition to the passport stamp) a supplementary immigration card. When I asked the agent for this document she said it was now all online and we did not need anything in print, the hotels should be able to access and we would not be charged. I was skeptical, but it did work the way she said. We were not charged the tax.

Exiting the customs area we easily found the Taxidatum driver ($20 airport to downtown, paid in USD) holding a board with our name on it. Now, we had been warned by the hotel people to prepare for heavy traffic because it was Halloween and the Festival de la Canción Criolla, a big city-wide music festival. What they did not say, was that we needed to prepare for Lima traffic. Period. Of course, I had read about it, but still… OMG.

There are rules to it, I’m sure. For context I will add that us Puerto Rican drivers and not shy or rule sticklers either, but still, I was very happy we had decided not to drive during this trip. I must say that we did not witness a single traffic accident and we did not see many dented cars, so drivers somehow do figure out who gets to go at the very last fraction of a second. It’s just that the rationale behind who has precedence remains entirely obscure to me; I just saw madness, mayhem. C loved it. I would not be able to advance a block if I was driving.

The drive from airport to Barranco should have taken 45 minutes but it was a good hour and a quarter with all the revelers on the street. So yes, as so many have advised, there is no way to accurately estimate the duration of this ride and it is better to err on the side of caution if going to the airport or taking a bus.

We got checked into our hotel, 3B Barranco, by the lovely receptionist who was ready with all kinds of recommendations. She confirmed that they could look up the immigration card online and we would not be charged with the resident tax. The 2nd floor room was nice. After dropping our bags, we headed out with the intention of having only a drink because after a full day of travel we were not hungry.

Steakhouse La Cuadra de Salvador is literally across the street from the hotel so that was the obvious destination. What a pretty place! Too cold to take of our jackets but still warm enough to sit outside on their nice bar. The only thing was that they had a DJ playing on the loud side of pleasant but it was all 80’s dance music so it wasn’t that bad (for me).

BTW, I have not heard that many songs from the Rolling Stones over the last 20 years as I did in a month in Peru. And don’t get me started on pan flute renditions of Dust in Wind, Sound of Silence or Condor’s Flight.

We only really wanted 2 glasses of wine but the waiter steered us in the direction of the bottle because it was a much better cost ratio. Fine. We could always take it back to the hotel (Ha! As if ever). A bottle it was. Our first taste of red Intipalka, one of the two major Peruvian wine producers, put us in a mood good enough to take a look at the menu. You know, for future reference, just in case…. Sweetbreads! Yes. Beef ‘mollejas’ is something we adore and -as with almost any 5th quarter meat product, is getting harder and harder to get in restaurants at home.

After triple checking that this was in fact what we thought it was we ordered some. Heavenly!
And then suddenly it was way past our bedtime and no there was no more wine to take back. Yes! We were loving Peru.

Next: The Search for Soles on a Bank Holiday
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Dec 5th, 2018, 05:57 PM
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LOL, the music selections were bizarre, weren't they?
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Dec 5th, 2018, 06:17 PM
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This was sooooo funny!!!! I don't know how many times we hear Mick singing Start Me Up. Music was constant source of surprise.

Funny story: Last year we went to Italy. C and I are having a drink in a dive bar in the middle of nowhere in Puglia and they happen to have good wifi, so I called the DD. We are talking and they suddenly start blasting Neil Diamond's Sweet Caroline. So DD is all 'Aren't you supposed to be in Italy? Where TF are you?!?!' bewildered. This trip we are in a little restaurant in Cuzco with good wifi. DD calls and it comes through. What comes up on their sound system? Neil Diamond's Sweet Caroline. We laughed, it seems to be our 'middle of nowhere wifi song'.
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Dec 5th, 2018, 06:50 PM
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Hilarious!!! I just read your post to CaroLYN - she is still laughing. Last time in Peru for us it seemed to be Dire Straits everywhere. Don’t get me wrong, I think Mark Knofler is up there with Hendrix, Clapton and Santana but not at every meal!!

It is similar here in Mexico, if it’s not Mariachi, it’s eighties British music everywhere ( and not the good stuff!). A dose of The Stones would be a welcome relief, believe me!

Keep it coming..
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Dec 6th, 2018, 03:01 AM
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And I told ALL of you so! Although the rooms are small, it's hard to overstate the value of the 3B staff in getting new visitors oriented and comfortable with Lima. They will go above and beyond in setting up unusual requests. Plus those lovely breakfasts by Rosa. I also much prefer Barranco as a "real" neighborhood although I suspect it continues to gentrify.

Glad you took a flyer and broke out of your Europe mold. I will follow along if you have more time to post.

Last edited by mlgb; Dec 6th, 2018 at 03:11 AM.
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Dec 6th, 2018, 05:23 AM
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Originally Posted by mlgb View Post
And I told ALL of you so! Although the rooms are small, it's hard to overstate the value of the 3B staff in getting new visitors oriented and comfortable with Lima. They will go above and beyond in setting up unusual requests. Plus those lovely breakfasts by Rosa. I also much prefer Barranco as a "real" neighborhood although I suspect it continues to gentrify.

Glad you took a flyer and broke out of your Europe mold. I will follow along if you have more time to post.
YES! Absolutely right. Those breakfasts were delicious and so very lovingly made!

The Europe Mold is the perfect way to put it. I was not even self-aware of how tightly I was holding to European vacations. Don't get me wrong, Spain is STILL my True Love, but yes, there is so much more out there and entirely satisfying is different ways. Vive la difference!
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Dec 6th, 2018, 09:28 AM
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I've only had the mollejas at the chicken place Pardo's, which are gizzards. I didn't know the beef mollejas are sweetbreads. It's always fun to learn the variations in local dialects.

Like "palta" for avocado.

Be sure not to ask "Tienes huevos?" in Mexico, crellston.
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Dec 6th, 2018, 04:00 PM
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Originally Posted by mlgb View Post
I've only had the mollejas at the chicken place Pardo's, which are gizzards. I didn't know the beef mollejas are sweetbreads. It's always fun to learn the variations in local dialects.

Like "palta" for avocado.

Be sure not to ask "Tienes huevos?" in Mexico, crellston.
Yes, asking someone like that for huevos would be a LOL.

We did have the chicken mollejas (another thing I love, but C not as much) further along in the story. They are somewhat common in PR, it is just the beef sweetbreads which are hard to find. My grandmother made a killer yellow rice with gizzards....
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Dec 6th, 2018, 06:04 PM
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Day 2: The Search for Soles, Beer, and Taxis

We are grownup travelers now. That means that I’m not allowed (or even willing) to schedule 7:00AM activities on the day after arrival, even if we tend to be early risers back home. I did not set an alarm. We had been woken up a few times during the night with noise from the street because I did not realize I had a window open in the bathroom, letting in the noise. Which is the reason we sort of snuggled into the comfy bed before sunrise and finally rolled out of bed at almost 9:00am. Unheard of. Yes, we are slacking.

I’m going to take this opportunity and give you the spill on Peruvian hotel breakfast (entirely different from what Peruvians actually eat themselves; I think they mostly have chicken soups). Each and every hotel that we went to exceeded my expectations. Having mostly traveled in the US and Europe, my expectations of hotel breakfasts (when included in the rate) are: stale coffee, bagged croissants, crumbly bagels, packaged cream cheese, and maybe dried out reconstituted scrambled eggs.

This was not so. Every single hotel we stayed included breakfast. Some were fancier than others but each and every one of them put a La Quinta or Embassy Suites spread to shame just based on quality and sometimes on variety as well. The fruits were exceptional. Papaya and mango were offered almost everywhere. Sooooo deliciously ripe!!!! And OMG the fruit juices (I never drink juice at home, waste of calories) were exceptional. Even something as silly sounding as watermelon juice was something I wish I could enjoy every day at home.

Yogurt everywhere will be liquid, mostly berry flavored and meant more to drink than to spoon. I did not find the cereals to be interesting (are they ever?). We only had one hotel in which hot cereals were offered (in Trujillo), I found them also to be very tasty but so liquid that they were better just to drink.

Everything everywhere was good except for the coffee. Next time I’m heading to South America I might just detox from coffee and switch over to tea. I did not have a cup of coffee to my complete liking in 28 days (I might be a little picky, but isn't everyone?). But for the record, I did not order ‘specialty’ coffee anywhere, I just had a cup of whatever was included in the hotel buffet. If I had ordered ‘barista’ coffees (where available) my opinion might have been different. Tea options were 500X better and coca ‘mate’ was surprisingly tasty.

Now, breakfast at 3B is a thing of beauty. Guest can choose from vegetarian sandwich, ham & cheese sandwich, or eggs in any way. They all come with fruit salad on the side, as well as toast and marmalade. The drip coffee might have been one of the better ones we had in Peru. Everything was carefully cooked and presented with pride. We lingered every day over breakfast and chatted with other guests.

Let’s talk about the money issues because that is what killed my well-laid plans for the day. As I stated before, we mostly travel in the US and in Europe and we are very well setup for that. We have access to euros without bank fees or additional conversion charges, but we did not find any bank product that would guarantee us the same for Peruvian soles. Everywhere we read it said ‘just take dollars and use the legal and properly identified money changers that will be in the tourist areas’. We also had the Alpaca Expeditions people asking us to pay cash and in dollars preferably, so it did make sense to take dollars with us.

We asked at 3B how we could go around changing our dollars into soles. Not a problem. Here in Barranco you should find the exchangers around the plaza.... Except that Thursday, November the 1st, was a huge bridge before the All-Saints holiday on the 2nd and there might not be as many banks open and the exchanges do not work if the bank does not.

OK, no problem, we’ll walk to the Barranco bank area and figure it out. The 3B people even offered us some soles to get us started in case we needed to take a taxi.

There was not a single open bank or money exchanger to be found.

Maybe downtown Lima but certainly not in Barranco. As we were penniless, we finally said to hell with bank fees and risked sticking one of our cards into an ATM (we have had then swallowed before so this is something we try not to do in closed banks); transaction denied.

I
n the mean time we enjoyed our walk through Barranco, admired the ‘gallinazos’ (turkey vultures) swooping from building tops to sea, peeked into a market, had 2 beers by the plaza at a place where they accepted credit cards, shot dozens of pictures, and witnessed a full religious procession.

Having spent most of the day meandering, around 3:00 PM we were finally rewarded with soles on the 3rd ATM machine we tried. YES! C had about had it and wanted a nap. I was not opposed to the idea. Yes, we are at that age. Luckily 3B was just a 15-minute walk away from where we were.

So my plan for the AM had been to visit downtown Lima and that never happened but I still had time to salvage the afternoon plan: a visit to the Larco Museum. The 3B person got us an Uber driver to take us there. Save our precious soles!

What a beautiful place! First thing to take you breath away is the big white villa with bougainvillea in every color imaginable hanging over every wall. Then comes the the main collection. It is top-notch and provides a concise yet informative journey through Peruvian art history. The artifacts in display are truly outstanding specimens and the exhibits have been carefully curated to provide the right amount of background history. I’m a museum whore but this museum in perfect for non-museum lovers.

There are two supplemental areas to the main collection: The ‘other’ exhibit and the erotic collection. We first visited the ‘others’. OMG, these are a series of rooms in which ceiling to floor shelve after shelves are chockfull with out of this world specimens, mostly ceremonial flasks. They are arranged by theme: monkeys, pumas, priests, owls, laborers, llamas, warriors, ducks….. EVERYTHING. The wealth of objects just drives in the point of how rich the Peruvian historical treasures are. Blew my mind away.

The erotic collection was certainly interesting. LOL.

The other gem of the Larco Museum is its restaurant. It has to be one of the most beautiful venues in its class. Since I had read great reviews about it we decided to go ahead and have dinner though it was still early and it was almost on the chilly side to sit outside. They offered to turn on the heaters so we settled for the evening. A place this beautiful could almost get away with not having outstanding food. They do. We shared some roasted scallops for appetizer and we both had the ‘Norteño’ Duck risotto. Worth every penny and calorie. One of the best overall meals we had in Peru. Highly recommended.

It was still early when we were done so we took a taxi back to downtown Barranco so that we could have a night cap at Ayahuasca, a very cool bar we had scoped out earlier located midway from the Barranco plaza and 3B.

Should we talk about taxis now? Maybe we should. We paid 7 soles to the Uber driver that took us from 3B to Larco. When we came out the door guard offered to get us a taxi from the ones waiting outside, they quoted 25 soles. We walked away. The driver offered 20 soles. We still walked away towards the main street. Almost each and every vehicle that passed us honked to see if we were interested in a ride. We only acknowledged one with proper taxi identifications on the vehicle. He offered 12 soles, we agreed on 10. We got in. This was our same experience with taxis all over, never had a problem. Just make sure that you agree on a price before you get in as taxi meters are non-existent.

Back at Ayahuasca we enjoyed not only our first Pisco Sours of the trip (excellent!) but also the bartenders practicing their flair pours. But it did not take long before the long day took the better part of us and we headed back to 3B to crash. Even if my plan did not pan out and we did not get to visit Square Lima, we did get a good taste of Barranco and the Larco Museum was a hit. Overall, a great first full day in Peru.

Next: The Changing of the Guard Which Might Have Happened and Do We Dare Eat Here.
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Dec 6th, 2018, 06:05 PM
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"Be sure not to ask "Tienes huevos?" in Mexico, crellston."

Thanks for the tip ladies! I googled the phrase - that could have been an emabarrasing breakfast tomorrow!
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Dec 7th, 2018, 09:57 AM
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not sure why I clicked on a TR about Peru, marigross, except that I saw it was one of yours, and i am so glad i did. Peru is not really a place that has ever interested me, Manu Pitchu not withstanding, but you have really piqued my interest. Thank you for all the lovely detail - it really brings it to life.

Also thanks for the spanish lessons - it should come in useful in Valencia next March. I shall now know not to say "tienes huevos"!
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Dec 7th, 2018, 11:09 AM
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I hope you keep writing marigross, I enjoyed hearing about your first day in one of my favorite places. I would always set aside at least half a day to wander around Barranco looking at galleries and murals. Good explanation of the taxi experience and warning on the ATM issues on bank holidays.

The use of huevos as slang for, erm, certain body parts may not be prevalent in Spain.

crellston, nothing serious, just other travel opportunities (Colombia last year) and getting too booked up in December. And there was that big quake near Puebla which I've read is pretty much recovered. Now I can follow your lead for Mexico City.

I was another one of those people who nearly left Larco without making time for the "adult" collection.

I wonder if the duck dish you had at Larco was a modern version of Chiclayo's Arroz con Pato (lots of cilantro). I love cilantro!

Last edited by mlgb; Dec 7th, 2018 at 11:21 AM.
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Dec 8th, 2018, 01:11 PM
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Thanks for the interest!

Hi Ann!!!!

Yes, I will continue to write but I'm currently bogged down by massive pre-holiday cleaning before our guests start arriving on the 13th. It's going to be a loooooong season.
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Dec 8th, 2018, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by mlgb View Post
I wonder if the duck dish you had at Larco was a modern version of Chiclayo's Arroz con Pato (lots of cilantro). I love cilantro!
We had Arroz con Pato in Trujillo which was really good, but the one at the Larco was kind of risotto and it was DELICIOUS. I love cilantro too.
marigross is offline  
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Dec 9th, 2018, 09:12 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 33
Following along! We head to Peru in June, excited to hear the details of your trip...
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