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Nicaragua, the new Costa Rica ?

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Mar 7th, 2014, 03:44 PM
  #1
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Nicaragua, the new Costa Rica ?

Per this article from the LA Times/ when I visited CR I heard from expat friends who live there, that they vacation in Nicaragua!

http://www.latimes.com/travel/la-tr-...507,full.story
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Mar 8th, 2014, 01:17 PM
  #2
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"_____ is the new Costa Rica" seems to have run its course as a genre. Each place has different things to offer.
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Mar 8th, 2014, 06:37 PM
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First, I have to say, I love Nicaragua, and I never pass up a chance to go there.

The writer of the article makes a pretty glaring error when she says, "The fighting ended nearly 15 years ago." No. The fighting ended in 1990 with the signing of a peace treaty that allowed for free elections. The election of a pro-business government in 1996 paved the way for investment in tourism as an earner of foreign exchange. The birth of modern tourism in Nicaragua took place about 15 years ago.

You're right, RAC. People have writing articles like this for years. I've written articles like this back in the day (about 15 years ago) with the themes: "Nicaragua is the new Costa Rica," "Nicaragua still has an image problem to overcome," "Nicaragua vs Costa Rica."

Nicaragua is Nicaragua. It has emerged. It is a tourism destination in its own right, and it has nothing to do with Costa Rica.
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Mar 9th, 2014, 03:16 AM
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Jeff, is there some prejudice against Nicaraguans in Costa Rica? We've heard a couple of guides/drivers mention things that made it seem that way. Is that pervasive or more isolated incidents?
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Mar 9th, 2014, 05:42 AM
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Yes, quite a bit. Large numbers of Nicaraguans have come to Costa Rica looking to escape poverty and find work. Costa Ricans all say, "They're taking our jobs," but truth be told, the Nicaraguans are doing the work that many Costa Ricans won't do any more, like picking coffee, in particular. Costa Ricans all insist, too, that the Nicaraguans have contributed to a spike in crime, but, I'm sorry. Most of the crime in Costa Rica is homegrown.

The Nicaraguans can't fade into the scenery. Their accent is much different.

Official relations between Costa Rica and Nicaragua are quite icy right now, and that contributes to the problem too.
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Mar 9th, 2014, 12:05 PM
  #6
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I've noticed in Costa Rica a prejudice against Nicaraguans and Colombians. No country is free from that nonsense.
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Mar 10th, 2014, 06:09 PM
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That is right.
No country has a monoply on prejudice.
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Mar 11th, 2014, 07:20 AM
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Thanks for clarifying, Jeff - those are the sorts of comments we heard. We were curious about what fueled it. It seems like those types of feelings sometimes develop when a wealthier country is situated next to one with fewer opportunities.
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Mar 12th, 2014, 07:28 AM
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Costa Rica has always seen itself as living in a "bad neighborhood," and that's not completely unjustified. Historically, it was surrounded by countries at war or with dictatorships. With every revolution and war and hurricane and earthquake and tsunami and volcanic eruption that fell upon Nicaragua, another wave of people fled to Costa Rica. (Some Nicaraguans suggest that their country is cursed.)

Abel Pacheco, the president before last, famously said something like, in a perfect world, we would get Denmark as our neighbor. Costa Rica has Nicaragua.

Not exactly the most diplomatic thing for a president to say.

Fortunately, Nicaragua and Central America are a lot more stable now than in the bad old days.
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Mar 12th, 2014, 07:35 AM
  #10
 
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Back to the original point in this thread, Nicaragua is an amazing country to visit in its own right. It does not need to live in Costa Rica's shadow and should not be compared to Costa Rica. It's quite different.

I recommend it to anyone here. Give it a look.
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Jan 16th, 2016, 01:50 PM
  #11
 
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@Jeff_Costa_Rica
Hi Jeff,
I am going to Hacienda Iguana in Nicaragua for a yoga retreat first week in April. I am arriving a few days prior, any recommendations on where to stay and what to do?
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Jan 17th, 2016, 07:16 AM
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I just saw the other thread you started, Carol. You can do a lot better than Managua. Managua is a big, sprawling, mostly ugly city with, admittedly, some great hotels and restaurants. But Granada has maintained its history with colonial architecture that has been converted into charming inns and restaurants. Granada just has a lot more to see and do.
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Jan 18th, 2016, 08:29 AM
  #13
 
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Huh, after hearing all of these positive reviews maybe my next trip should be to Nicaragua
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Jan 31st, 2016, 05:52 PM
  #14
 
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@Jeff_Costa_Rica thank you..The retreat is at Hacienda Iguana...would it be better to stay near there? are there any cities where we can learn to dance Salsa?
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