Ideas on where to stay in Buenos Aires?

Old Aug 29th, 2006, 08:35 AM
  #1  
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Ideas on where to stay in Buenos Aires?

Just started reading about the different neighborhoods or districts.

Interested in staying in an apartment and there appears to be a lot of choices, especially in areas like Palermo and Ricoleta.

Are these too far removed from the main attractions? It's my first time visiting (going in November). How is the public transport from outlying areas to the center?
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Old Aug 29th, 2006, 09:43 AM
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Our first trip we stayed in Recoleta and enjoyed the area for dining and nightlife. On weekends there is a great outdoor market in Recoleta and you are also close to the Eva Peron cemetary. We walked most of Buenos Aires but we workout regularly. For anything further (like Palermo) we used taxis which were very reasonable. Also you can book tango shows that include transportation from your hotel/apartment. Hope this helps!
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Old Aug 30th, 2006, 08:09 AM
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Thanks.

It looks like Plaza de Mayo is walkable from Recoleta.

Is the cemetary worth looking at? A lot of rentals seem to list proximity to it as if it's some advantage.
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Old Aug 30th, 2006, 08:38 AM
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you can spend a few hours at the cemetary. It is certainly one of the attractions of BA but I would not base your loding decision just by the proximity to the Cemetary. Still, Recoleta would be a great location to stay. We had a room in Loi Suites Recoleta last November. Getting to Palermo was an easy 5 USD cab ride. Also, you are fairly close (by cab) to San Telmo. Plaza de Mayo area did not really appeal to us. I also would not say that it is within walking distance to Recoleta.
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Old Aug 30th, 2006, 10:07 AM
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Igor, what did you think of the Loi Suites Recoleta?
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Old Aug 30th, 2006, 10:57 AM
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It was a very nice hotel. Not expensive but definetely a solid 4-star. Their breakfast room is beautiful, the rooms are large and airy. The bathrooms are all done in marble. The hotel is decorated in white tones and is very clean. Their windows are double-paned so you don't hear any noise from the street down below.
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Old Aug 30th, 2006, 12:05 PM
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Thank you, Igor. You have certainly set my mind at ease.
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Old Aug 31st, 2006, 08:17 AM
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Hello scrb:

We stayed in an apartment in Ricoleta last March for 4 weeks. Also visited Mendoza and San Juan not far from Mendoza.

We found Ricoleta in Bs. As. to be a safe and better off area than many. Lots of good restaurants.

Taxi is very cheap in Bs. As. but the drivers do not shut up.

My advantgage is that my wife grew up in Bs. As. although it has been about 12 years since our previous visit and about 50 years since she left to come to Canada.

Of course, in the cab my wife spoke to me in English and to the driver in perfect Bs. As. Spanish [they immediatly know the difference]. Once she spoke Spanish, the drivers would not quite talking even after we got to our desitnation.

Actually, we used a "remis" and only on rare occassions did we use taxi. My wife would call from our apartment, give our location and desitnation and the company would quote us the cost. When the driver came, he knew who he was to pick up. We would call the company when we wanted to return.

Argentina appears to be bouncing back from their economic problems. We found well educated people driving the remis. Engineers and accountants who were older and having difficulty with their regular employment. We tipped the driver after rounding UP the fare price.

In my opinion, prices were low compared to what we would pay in Canada. It must certainly be lower than in the U.S.

There are a lot of cafes and general shopping and entertainment near the cemetary but we never went to see any dead people.

Bs. As. was very safe and the people were most friendly. We never travel with gold hanging off of us, nor do we advertise to have any special wealth. Which we do not.

One suggestion I would make would be to consider buying leather goods if you like that sort of thing.

We got some shoes and boots and other items. Very reasonable. We did not buy on Florida [walking street] but went to the leather district and walked around there.

Many small factories producing some fine [and some not so fine] product.

Beef is good and very reasonalbe too.

Our whole trip was for 9 weeks and we did get some souveniers along the way but bought most of our gifts in Bs. As. where there was greater choice with good prices.

Have a good time.

Woodie
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Old Aug 31st, 2006, 12:43 PM
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My only concern about Ricoleta is that it's not served by the subte.

So I understand the remis are reasonable (and you can flag them from the street?). But do the drivers and the dispatchers speak English? Do they charge you for picking you up at where you're staying or does the meter start once you get in?

I usually like to use credit cards as much as possible and only draw cash from the ATM in local currency when absolutely needed. Looks like taxis or remises will require having more cash.
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Old Aug 31st, 2006, 12:54 PM
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Just carry small bills to pay for the cab. Also, there was a scam going on where the cab driver would tell you that the bill that you handed to him was fake. He would switch your genuine bill with his fake ones (especially if it is dark inside the cab). Don't keep handing him more bills thinking that he is helping you. Just ask him to take you to the nearest police station.
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Old Nov 11th, 2006, 01:19 PM
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Sorry if this is a silly question -- but what is a "remis"? Also, could someone describe the difference between a "radio cab" and a regular cab? Going to Buenos Aires in 3 weeks and hoping not to be ripped off due to ignorance!
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Old Nov 11th, 2006, 02:13 PM
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The safest way to take a taxi is to call for one(radio taxi) on the phone. The dispatcher will tell you how many minutes you have to wait. Usually ten, if it is a rainy day much more. Hotels call for taxis, restaurants etc you can do it yourself providing a phone number and name to the dispatcher. Your hotel phone number will do.
Some good radio taxis companies, are PIDALO, FRETAX, PREMIUM, ALO TAXI, TAXI PARIS etc
This is the safest way because the drivers are registered within the company and your call will be registered too.
All taxis charge the same.
Remises, are also grouped in companies, also called by the phone. Same security applies providing it is a good remise company. The cost is almost the same. REmises charge for the distance of the ride,
like between your hotel and the International Airport they charge $55 pesos. No matter if you are delayed by traffic this is going to be the charge. Taxis have a meter like anywhere else.
If you must flag one taxi in the street your best bet is to look for the name of a good company painted on the door like the ones I mentioned before. Is that clear? Of course if you flag it your call will not be registered.
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Old Nov 11th, 2006, 02:15 PM
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A remise is a regular car. Is like renting a chauffered car.
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Old Nov 11th, 2006, 02:17 PM
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Igor has it right. In buenos Aires, or in any city for that matter, pay taxis,remises etc with small bills.
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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 06:53 AM
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You can flag a radio taxi on the street. There are many around; they will say "radio taxi" and have a phone number on it. I was so freaked out about hailing a cab on the streets after reading these posts, but we were with a local friend, who said it's fine to get in the radio ones that circulate.

We stayed at the Home Hotel, which we LOVED LOVED LOVED. It is a taxi ride to get to the other areas, but the taxis are CHEAP! The part of town is definitely in the "up and coming" category, so I don't know what type of neighborhood you want, but it is near a hopping part of town, particularly on the weekend and at night. No problems at all about safety, though. To get to where the action is, though, you have to cross the railroad tracks; a gritty walk, but we did not feel unsafe at all.

But, the Home Hotel had something about it that I just loved. It is small, tranquil and stylish in a very relaxing way. The garden was wonderful, much better than I expected from the web photos.

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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 07:27 AM
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We stayed in Palermo Soho a few short blocks from the Plaza Italia Subte stop.
We walked; used the subte and taxis - only one taxi had a malfunctioning meter which charged us double from the Buquebus dock to the hotel.
The Recoleta Cemetary is amazing and we got to see a formal Sat funeral while there.
Took the subte to Plaza de Mayo and then walked to the San Telmo Sun. fair and La Boca for late comida at Il Matterello (great/don't miss it, and recommended by Saltshaker).
M
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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 08:26 AM
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bookmarking. thanks
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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 09:13 AM
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Hi mikemo as an old visitor of Buenos Aires, and also someone that lived there years ago, taxis waiting at the Buquebus are all the same way:a MAFIA. Avoid them as much as you can. Best way to do it is to ask your own hotel to send you a remise to pick you up. Anything might happen with those guys. They are not to be trusted at all. May I tell you if your only problem was to be charged twice the fare you were lucky.
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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 09:17 AM
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Skatedancer, I am so happy you enjoyed Bs As. Regarding flagging taxis, for locals it is easier , they know well the city and have no accent, so to flag a taxi is no big deal. I do it all the time( because I was a local once), being careful to flag an unit from a taxi company that I know is good. But
whoever flags a taxi has to be aware that the whole purpose of calling a radio taxi is defeated. When a taxi is called your name will be registered by the dispatcher as a safegard.
I believe avrooster has also explained this in this forum.
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Old Nov 12th, 2006, 09:34 AM
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G,
Actually it was a radio taxi who just discharged two passengers and there were four of us. I was in the front seat and the meter was obviously not functioning correctly (which I gently pointed out in Central Mexican Spanish), but let it slide and we split the "double" fare ($10.US v. $5.)
Had no problems with any others.
M
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