Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Wine experts; is there a French equivalent of the Italian Moscato D'Asti?

Wine experts; is there a French equivalent of the Italian Moscato D'Asti?

Old Sep 18th, 2013, 03:40 PM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 4,849
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Wine experts; is there a French equivalent of the Italian Moscato D'Asti?

My wife is not much of a drinker, but she loves the semi-sweet slightly fizzy Italian wine, Moscato D'Asti by La Spinetta. We will be spending some time in France this coming May, and I would like to be able to find a substitute for her in Paris. Does anyone know what an equivalent French wine would be?

I don't drink sweet wines, but the Asti is quite nice. One can taste a fruity back flavor; apricots, perhaps. If anyone can steer me in the right direction it will save me from doing a lot of comparison testing --- not that there is anything wrong with slugging down a series of nice wines, except some of them are like drinking perfumed syrup, IMHO
nukesafe is offline  
Old Sep 18th, 2013, 04:45 PM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 4,596
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Maybe a demi-sec champagne....it is sweeter than Brut. Or possibly a Cremant d'Alsace...seems sweeter to me than Brut champagne.
denisea is offline  
Old Sep 18th, 2013, 08:31 PM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 4,238
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Why would you want a French version of soda pop?
Rastaguytoday is offline  
Old Sep 18th, 2013, 08:49 PM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,911
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<i>Rastaguytoday on Sep 19, 13 at 12:31am
Why would you want a French version of soda pop?</i>

He already told us
<i>
Posted by: nukesafe on Sep 18, 13 at 7:40pm
My wife is not much of a drinker,</i>

In Italy this stuff is probably cheaper than soda pop.
spaarne is offline  
Old Sep 18th, 2013, 09:20 PM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2,505
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
A Champagne doux or a Clairette de Die or a Blanquette de Llimoux doux.
Pvoyageuse is offline  
Old Sep 18th, 2013, 10:11 PM
  #6  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 6,325
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Would a Kir Royal do, as aperitive? That would be fizzy and sweet.
Tulips is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 12:28 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,707
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Either Cremant d'Alsace or a Blanquette de Limeoux, both fizzy and affordable, and probably better than a cheap champagne.
Carlux is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 02:49 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 631
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
We enjoyed Blanquette de Limoux last year. Also Cremant de Bourgougne which we bought at a cave in Lugny near Macon.
rhon is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 03:28 AM
  #9  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 23,624
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Demi-sec sparkling Vouvray can be excellent.
ekscrunchy is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 04:47 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 8,159
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Any sparkling wine described as "doux" . Pick by region
sheila is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 05:49 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 662
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I know you're not looking for dessert wines, per se, but I thought I'd throw out a Beaumes de Venise. It's not a sparkling wine, but has a nice effervescence. Sweet sweet, though.

Maybe some wines from the Jura as well, although not necessarily fizzy.

Have fun experimenting!!
YankyGal is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 07:05 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 34,892
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I also think she would like a kir royale apperitif. YOu don't really drink that with the main dish, but since she's not much of a drinker, anyway, I presume that isn't why she needs a wine drink, but more like a cocktail. There isn't any sweet fizzy wine you'd have with your meal as far as I know (I can't stand fizzy alcoholic stuff or sweet wine, so can't imagine it, but could be wrong).
Christina is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 08:39 AM
  #13  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 4,849
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
All good suggestions, (except for the expected cheap shot from Rasta) for which I thank you. In answer to his query, however, I do love the woman, and a happy and loved woman makes for a marvelous vacation.

I have since done some online research and found the French wines that may be similar would be made from the Muscat Blanc a petit grains grape. I assume that would give the fruity aroma, that the Champagne grape does not impart. My hope is that will narrow it down so I don't have a refrigerator in the apartment completely full of bottles with one sip gone from each.
nukesafe is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 09:02 AM
  #14  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 4,849
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
BTW, I found this on line. The part about the socks made me smile:

Moscato d’Asti is a lightly sweet sparkling wine produced in the town of Asti, in the Piedmont section of northern Italy. Moscato Bianco, the grape from which it is produced, is thought to have been growing in the region for many centuries. In the early 1600s, a jeweler from Milan named Giovan Battista Croce, on his riches from making royal jewelry, moved to Turin and bought his own vineyard around the towns of Montevecchio and Candia. In 1606, he published a book called Of the Excellence of Wines That Are Made on the Mountain of Turin and How to Make Them, which described the recipe for Moscato d’Asti: The stems have to first be removed from the grapes right before pressing, then the must (crushed grape juice prior to filtration) is fermented separate from the skins. Then the juice is repeatedly filtrated until it runs clean. Never mind that the prescribed method of filtering wine in those days was to use tightly wound cloth. Which often meant socks.
Moscato d’Asti is sweeter than Asti Spumante, another regional sparkler from the same grape. For Moscato, the fermentation process is stopped earlier, so less sugar is eaten up by the yeast. The residual sugars present a sweeter, less alcoholic wine.

But there were unforeseen dangers early on in its production, and so producers often made Moscato d’Asti strictly for personal use. By the time the wine was bottled after the harvest, cellars had gotten quite frigid and the fermentation that was occurring in the bottles would halt until spring. But then along with warm sunshine and singing birdies came the sound of exploding bottles because the yeast cells started doing their thing again, causing excess CO2, which got trapped. And the bottiglie, they go a-BOOM!

But nowadays, winemakers have the benefit of modern technology to produce delicious, and safe, Moscato d’Asti. This lightly sweet, aromatic wine is often very low in alcohol, around 4.5 - 6.5%, due to the residual sugars. It is enjoyed both as a dessert wine and as an aperitif.
nukesafe is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 09:06 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,911
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
<i>nukesafe on Sep 19, 13 at 12:39pm
All good suggestions,</i>

I'm afraid that my contribution wasn't very helpful. It's been years since I've had any wine like you describe. Then I noticed that I keep some splits here which I used for cooking. It has a distinctive flavor. The closest I can compare it with is Greek retsina, although that one is off scale. However, maybe her taste buds would favor a sparkling ros&eacute; from the Loire.
spaarne is offline  
Old Sep 19th, 2013, 09:13 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,690
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If it is Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains you're after then you should find a clear winner if you can track down a <i>Clairette de Die</i> which is a naturally sparkling wine from the Rhone. Characterised by a sweet fruitiness, maybe apricot or peach. It tends to drunk young and is served chilled - it's a light-hearted kind of a wine, rather like the Asti your wife is so fond of.

Beware however the <i>Cremante de Die</i> which is a brut methode champagnois and is more appley/peary and an aperetif.

Clairette is not always straight forward to track down and, to my mind, has a rather patchy distribution but you'll possibly have best luck if you can get yourself to a Carrefour or Auchan hypermarché.

Cheers!

Dr D.
Dr_DoGood is offline  
Old Sep 20th, 2013, 08:52 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,038
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I, too, vote for Vouvray. Try some here before your trip. Easy to find. The Muscadets from the region of Nantes are supposed to be excellent but am not familiar with them.
Bedar is offline  
Old Sep 20th, 2013, 09:02 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,038
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Frederick Wildman's A Wine Tour of France is available on Amazon. Great reference book written by the former owner of Wildman & Son NY wine importers.
Bedar is offline  
Old Sep 20th, 2013, 09:18 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 23,813
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
Any sparkling wine (champagne, crémant,Saumur, etc.) indicating "demi-sec" should be suitable for a person wanting sparkling non-dry wines.
kerouac is offline  
Old Sep 20th, 2013, 09:20 AM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 23,813
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 1 Post
Avoid "doux" wines -- they are sickenly sweet and I can't imagine who drinks them.
kerouac is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Your Privacy Choices -