Why No "Go Backs" to Germany?

Aug 15th, 1999, 09:56 AM
  #1  
Bonnie
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Why No "Go Backs" to Germany?

I noticed recently, in the "Why Go Back?" thread, that I constantly saw Paris, London, Italy and Hawaii mentioned but nothing about Germany. Since I am being pressured to go to Germany by family who loved it and have friends over there, is it a place that's interesting but doesn't grab your soul? Is that why I heard no rhapsodies about it? Thank you, Fodorites!
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 11:31 AM
  #2  
kay
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Germany was one of five countries I said I want to go back to repeatedly. And, in fact, I have. My last three trips to Europe were to Germany. And I've only scratched the surface! Believe me, it resonates with me and I would go back yearly if I could, or even live there for two years.
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 11:41 AM
  #3  
Bonnie
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My apologies, Kay. I re-read your post on that thread, and you did mention Germany, but I believe yours was about the only reference on that whole thread to Germany. Thank you for your response!
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 01:58 PM
  #4  
toom
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I didn't read that post (go back), but i really enjoy visiting my friend and his family there. I have been there twice, and have already booked and paid for the air-ticket for my third trip in a month time.
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 03:15 PM
  #5  
Baba Zeba
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Bonnie:

Germany is a fine travel destination. Been there 3 times and we are headed back next week. The south is filled with fun loving people and great places to stay and explore. The east is filled with all kinds of interesting historical content, and Berlin is one of my favorite cities in the world. Do go and enjoy the richness that is Germany!
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 03:40 PM
  #6  
Mary
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I cannot wait to go back to Germany, although our travel plans are for France this year. I love the Black Forest, Heidelberg, and Bavaria. I will never forget the looks we got when my husband drove down the pedestrian zone in Heidelberg. Maybe we'll get back next year.
 
Aug 15th, 1999, 05:03 PM
  #7  
tom
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Bonnie,

Been there five times, and that was before I went to work for a German company.

Go back...of course, but only if you love beautiful scenery, some of the best beer in the world, history in great portions, friendly people, particularly in Bavaria, a magnificent sense of history from Rothenburg to Munich, great countryside picnics, "fat" laden food that tastes very, very good...and of course did I mention great beer!!!
 
Aug 16th, 1999, 09:13 AM
  #8  
Kim
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Bonnie,

I went to Germany several years ago and would love to go back. I didn't respond to the previous post. Germany is beautiful and the food is wonderful. I also met very nice people there. A train ride along the Rhine is not to be missed! Remember to look up to see the castles.
 
Aug 16th, 1999, 03:25 PM
  #9  
raeona
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About a month or six weeks ago, there was a loooong thread on here about Germany -- and the fervor of most of the posters made me think that Germany should be boosted way higher on my priority list! Perhaps you can find that discussion with a search.
 
Aug 16th, 1999, 06:43 PM
  #10  
Lori
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My husband and I got hooked on germany a few years ago and I can't quit going back. Every time he asks where I want to go I remember another castle I want to stay in or another area I want to visit! We have made great friends there and find it an easy country to drive in and I just love it. Whether it's standing on our friends' deck high up on the top of the Alps or driving along the Mosel or Rhine rivers, Germany is the place I always return to. It always feels like we are returning to an old friend....
 
Dec 13th, 1999, 04:26 PM
  #11  
noname
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i am going anon on this one,b/c i am about to disagree with all of you and not looking forward to the fall out....i went to germany once, to munich, and as i rode the train out to dachau and realized that dachau is as close to downtown munich as queens is to NYC, and as easily accessible, i got a really bad feeling about a country full of people who could pretend they didn't know about the holocaust when nazi's were burning people within 20 minutes of a major city. growing up, i always figured the camps were in remote areas, and the lack of people living around them helped with the secrecy. and another thing i have never been able to understand is how americans of jewish descent can and do willingly travel to germany, and support german companies by buying german cars. recently a jewish friend of mine went to gemany and came back raving about the ease of use and efficiency of the auto-bahn( she drove it in her rented volkswagon) i was amazed that she didn;t make the connection that the autobahn was developed specifically to help the third reich!
 
Dec 13th, 1999, 06:20 PM
  #12  
also
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When we visited Germany and went into Poland with a youd german lady, we asked the same question. Her response: were you responsible for the slavery in america ]? Good question.
 
Dec 13th, 1999, 08:06 PM
  #13  
Al
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You should have asked that young lady if she knew that America fought a war that ended slavery; Nazi Germany fought a war so that it could continue to kill its victims.
 
Dec 13th, 1999, 08:11 PM
  #14  
JMGarrison
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I can't understand why anyone would not want to return to Germany. Especallly at this time of year when all of the towns have a great Christmas Market. They have gifts to offer plus most of them have food locally cooked to offer. Especially, fish type things to go. They are not pushing thier wates but do make them available for you to buy. Germany is my favorite place to visit close to Christmas.
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 01:09 AM
  #15  
FrankR
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Al, check your history, "America" fought
no such war.What country did they fight?
The message of the holocaust is that if it can happen in a highly civilised place like Germany it can happen anywhere, including your home.In fact the sort of activities right wing groups get up to in the US are banned in Germany, where you can be prosecuted for denying the holocaust.
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 04:07 AM
  #16  
Al
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FrankR: one of the issues decided by the Civil War was the freedom of the slaves held by the states that had seceded. One of the freedoms Americans enjoy -- and sometimes abuse -- is the freedom of expression, odious as some of our nut groups behave. Germany's treatment of its "guest workers" -- especially those of Turkish blood -- is just plain awful.
Even children born in Germany of Turkish parents have no rights to become German citizens. Compare that with America!
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 04:17 AM
  #17  
ilisa
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Noname, very ignorant of you. I am a Jewish woman who lost many relatives in Auschwitz. Yet, I am married to a man of German descent whose father came to the United States in the 1950s. Why? Because I am intelligent enough to realize that not all Germans were aligned with the Nazi party. My father-in-law and his family spent World War II trying to flee the Nazis. I also learned through my husband's family what beauty Germany has to offer. Would I visit it? Yes. I can't penalize a whole country and its people for Adolph Hitler and the Third Reich, which, in case you haven't noticed, no longer exists.
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 04:41 AM
  #18  
Rex
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You think there is a good general awareness of what's going on Queens by Manhattanites?

"pretend THEY didn't know"? - who is this THEY? The average German living in Munich? - - under war time conditions, I would have not have expected most people to have much of an idea what's going on outside a one-mile circle of where they lived.

If you mean that the "press" should have done a better job of informing the German people - - well, I am not a student of the history of journalism in Europe during the war, but I believe that the press - - as in any war - - was as much a prisoner as any of those held hostage in the camps.

This is not news: "In war, the first casualty is truth" - - Herodotus
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 05:11 AM
  #19  
Russ
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I think Frank had it right. The Germans are not much different from us, culturally speaking, yet certain elements in their culture -- a need for conformity/uniformity, pride in country, and the belief that God was behind them, among others -- combined to create the holocaust. We can easily see that what happened there was wrong. But can we say it happened because the Germans are an evil people? Their culture isn't that different today from what it was before, nor from our own. I say it could happen here too unless we understand and remember those events. THAT is one very important reason to visit Germany! Go to Dachau. Visit the WW II sites where the Allies sacrificed to put an end to the greatest threat to the world ever. Then, get to know the charming, civilized German people; if your experience is like mine, you'll find great similarities betwn our cultures and many things to admire. Then, realize that we, too must "never forget" and always be watchful that our culture doesn't commit similiar acts.

By the way, modern Germans visiting here can hardly believe that we allow the proliferation of guns to kill people at a rate 10 times higher than in Europe,or that we go about our own business while the insane and the drunks lie about on our streets, or that we salute the flag and say a pledge in schools everyday, then complain that there isn't enough prayer in schools (the Nazis were famous for such activities.) Then I remind them that this is the land that also sent thousands to die and murder innocent people in Vietnam and that became the cradle of slavery. We definitely have our faults. Let's keep an eye on our own problems, too.
 
Dec 14th, 1999, 09:06 AM
  #20  
nickie
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Hi Bonnie! I don't usually respond to long threads, so I guess I was one of those that didn't say how much I love Germany. I've lived there, and gone back there. There's so much history, and so much unspoiled beautiful scenery, especially in Bavaria.
As for anonymous, I really dislike that some people can't stand up for what they believe by using their own name. I lost relatives in the Holocaust, but they were gypsies not Jews, of which you generally here very little. Still, I don't blame the German people today for what happened then. Just as I do not blame myself for what happened to the native americans. They are the most ignored people in our country, and among the poorest - if we follow your train of thought, how can you stand to live in America?
 

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