What About Paris Hotel Breakfasts

Old Jan 7th, 1999, 05:50 AM
  #1  
Kathy
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What About Paris Hotel Breakfasts

Will you share opinions of taking breakfast in the hotel (still trying to decide which one, darn it!) versus eating on the run - or in a place nearby. In Germany and England we stayed in local Best Westerns or local Holiday Inns and were spoiled with delightful and lavish buffet breakfasts (which added a small amount to our daily rate which was always a promotion or very reasonable price to begin with, but breakfast usually carried us to dinner - of course with snacking during the day. I don't think this is customary in Paris, am I right? Cost-wise, what's the difference of a 40ff/hotel breakfast versus breakfast on the run from a local shop? I'm trying to make this as easy for us as possible when we get there, and I don't usually get hung up on these tiny details, but .... Thanks for suggestions.
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 07:11 AM
  #2  
Bob
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Kathy, My experience is generally with 2 star hotels in Paris. Breakfast is continental - coffee or chocolate, and a baguette and/or
croissant, and jams, etc. It is usually quite basic. Fruit, for example, is not something I have seen. I have stayed in pricier hotels which have had nice buffets, but unless you are paying more, this doesn't seem to be the case. Eating on the run wouldn't be any more expensive, and stopping in a bakery does get you a much wider variety, and fresher, choice. But, the hotel breakfast is handy.
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 07:25 AM
  #3  
B.Irving
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When staying in Paris, we have never had
the breakfast included with our hotel stay, although in Scandinavia, Germany, & England, we have had breakfast included & thought it was worth it. Last time in Paris we thought we would try the Breakfast 1 morning -- we stayed in a Best Western associated hotel near La Madeleine(SP?). I did not think it was worth the price. When ever staying in Paris, we scope out the nearest bakery, & not just for pasteries. There is usually 1 on the way to the metro stop. It is easy to stop in & get something to eat & carry it out & continue on your way. That was 1 of the favorite activities of my 9 yr old son when he was with us in Paris. He looked forward to, every morning (in fact he had to have it) to getting French bread. I prefer the bakery route for us, it was quicker for us to be on our way to the daily activities that way, & in Paris there was so much to do & so little time to do it.
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 08:49 AM
  #4  
Lee
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Kathy: Upon our arrival in Paris, we stopped at a local place after dropping our luggage off at our hotel around 9:30AM, waiting for our room to be readied. We had the best omeletes and croissants, washing it down with "1664" beer and spent about 100FF. For our remaining days, we had breakfast included in our hotel bill (Sully St. Germain) and it was of the buffet type and very good. They had coffee, juice, breads, jellies, fruit, cereal, cheeses and meats. It was well worth it and convenient, with virtually no waiting.

The omelete and beer, oddly enough, was quite memorable.

Have fun!
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 09:03 AM
  #5  
Myriam
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We also had our breakfast included in the hotel bill (hotel Golden Tulip Cayré)and it was identical to the description Lee gives. I personally prefer to eat before I go outside and I would already be starving if I first had to find a convenient place to eat something.
Note: French people eat very little for breakfast (croissant or pain-au-chocolat and baguette with jam with a huge mug of coffee) and in the French hotels (not belonging to an international chain) you will get no more than that.
Also note that drinks and "in-betweens" (like pancakes, waffles, pastries, ...) are extremely expensive in France.
Bon voyage !
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 10:38 AM
  #6  
elaine
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Hi Kathy,
Don't worry about obsessing about breakfasts, most of the questions in this forum express anxiety of one kind or another!
Why don't you let us know when you choose a hotel? Those who have stayed there can perhaps comment on the hotel breakfast, and those who know the neighborhood can perhaps recommend some nearby cafes,pastry shops, salons de the, etc for a light morning bite.
I think some hotel breakfasts are worth it and some are definitely not. So keep us posted.
elaine
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 10:39 AM
  #7  
elaine
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Hi Kathy,
Don't worry about obsessing about breakfasts, most of the questions in this forum express anxiety of one kind or another!
Why don't you let us know when you choose a hotel? Those who have stayed there can perhaps comment on the hotel breakfast, and those who know the neighborhood can perhaps recommend some nearby cafes,pastry shops, salons de the, etc for a light morning bite.
I think some hotel breakfasts are worth it and some are definitely not. So keep us posted.
elaine
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 10:39 AM
  #8  
elaine
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Hi Kathy,
Don't worry about obsessing about breakfasts, most of the questions in this forum express anxiety of one kind or another!
Why don't you let us know when you choose a hotel? Those who have stayed there can perhaps comment on the hotel breakfast, and those who know the neighborhood can perhaps recommend some nearby cafes,pastry shops, salons de the, etc for a light morning bite.
I think some hotel breakfasts are worth it and some are definitely not. So keep us posted.
elaine
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 10:40 AM
  #9  
elaine
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Hi Kathy,
Don't worry about obsessing about breakfasts, most of the questions in this forum express anxiety of one kind or another!
Why don't you let us know when you choose a hotel? Those who have stayed there can perhaps comment on the hotel breakfast, and those who know the neighborhood can perhaps recommend some nearby cafes,pastry shops, salons de the, etc for a light morning bite.
I think some hotel breakfasts are worth it and some are definitely not. So keep us posted.
elaine
 
Old Jan 7th, 1999, 11:55 AM
  #10  
s.fowler
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Well the "ghost" ate a witty post More briefly then.
I am not a morning person. The thought of going OUT for breakfast appalls me We also use breakfast-time on a trip to go over the day's plan. And you can go back to your room after breakfast and do "necessary things."
And in Paris ANY croissant or baguette is better than what I can find easily at home. I don't view a Paris hotel breakfast as a gourmet occasion, but as a convenient way to start the day in a modicum of privacy and quiet.
But as they say: "chacun a son gout"
 
Old Jan 8th, 1999, 11:58 PM
  #11  
Donna
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You haven't mentioned when you are going, but while you are bemusing and obsessing over your hotel selections, the best choices will be filling up quickly. Nothing more disappointing than to spend hours and hours researching and narrowing down your choices only to discover that each and every one is completely booked for your dates by the time you've finally decided to reserve (can you guess I've done this?). Best would be to reserve at your final two or three choices, making careful note of the cancellation policies and keep shopping or make your final decision once you are assured of reservations. Also, it is essential that you obtain a WRITTEN confirmation by fax or whatever. It's a good idea to confirm it again a month ahead, a week ahead, and the day before. I've never had a problem (but my husband who never follows up when traveling on business has) and have heard horror stories. As for breakfast, most hotels offer the "continental" type, a very few a full buffet. Note also, that even though many hotels list the price of breakfast separately from the rates, it's de rigueur to take it and often added to your bill whether you've had it or not. So, be sure to inquire about this. It's difficult to find bacon, eggs, pancakes, waffles, etc. in Paris. And, that is expensive. I abhor having to shower, dress and go out for that first cup of coffee, so always opt for the croissant and coffee delivered to the room. Nearly every hotel has a nearby cafe where you can have a "French" version of breakfast, more economical if you order at the bar/counter rather than seated at a table. And, enjoying your morning coffee and croissant on a sidewalk terrace while enjoying the passing parade is the quintessential Parisian experience. However, I wouldn't recommend filling up at breakfast to hold yourselves until dinner. There is an enormous array of "casual" food (shops, street vendors - awesome crepes, open air markets) you will want to enjoy. Not to be confused with "eating on the run", which the natives can't imagine. Consider ducking into several shops or visiting a street market for cheese, pate, bread, pastries, wine and heading to one of the many parks or gardens to enjoy your repast. And, in many cases, it is much more economical to have your main meal at lunchtime, rather than at dinner. Same items, same portions, lower prices. Although, not necessarily - depends on the place. You may wish to check out Hotel Relais Bosquet. Utterly charming and friendly. A short walk from the Ecole Militaire metro stop and just around the corner from rue Cler (of Rick Steves fame). In each room is a "hospitality" tray for making tea or coffee. And, there are two types of breakfast - croissant and coffee or expanded - which you can enjoy in your room or the breakfast room, or forego. You can book on the web (just do a search, there are several websites with "online brochures" for doing this) in English. And, the rates are lower moderate. Note also that the Best Westerns in Paris, unlike elsewhere, are in neighborhoods and quite charming - not what you'd expect (i.e. standard "chain" facility).
 
Old Jan 9th, 1999, 10:15 AM
  #12  
John Grant
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Forget about breakfast anywhere in France. At a three star Restaurant-Inn near Dijon, the gastronomic capital of France, we were greeted with coffee/milk, last night's bread, some jam, and a small bunch of tired looking grapes. All other meals are quite a different thing, arguably the best in the world. If a good breakfast is important to you, stick to Great Britain.
 
Old Jan 9th, 1999, 10:24 AM
  #13  
marilyn
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Although I would never even CONSIDER leaving my hotel without breakfast, I think these postings are also demonstrating other factors in the decision. As the previous poster said, the breakfast price may be listed as separate. but is usually not considered so when the bill is figured. Actually, we recently went to Paris for the first time in nearly 20 years, and were pleasantly surprised at the "breakfast buffet" concept at our economy hotel, the 42-room Trinite Plaza that we had through a cheap American Airlines package. The buffet cart in the downstairs breakfast room included, in addition to the requisite croissant and baguettes, yoghurt, cereal, fruit, juice, boiled eggs, and even some kind of meat looking thing. We had a 4th-floor room, and each morning met our teens, whose room was on the second floor, in the breakfast room. The girls loved that the staff knew them, brought them their preferred hot drinks right away, etc.

My final comment would be, do people really go to Paris with the idea of economizing on food? If so, they miss a lot of what I personally enjoy when traveling!
 
Old Jan 11th, 1999, 10:34 AM
  #14  
Kathy
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My posts aren't going through - hope all of them don't hit at one time. Thanks for your insights. $$$$$ is not my concern; rather a comparison between what it is the hotels offer and what the shops offer for the same price. Sorry, Marilyn, for that inference. I also like leaving the hotel with a full tummy, necessities taken care of, ready to face a day of unknown memories. I like breakfast "at home". Having said that, my curiousity questions the pros and cons of each. Eating from vendors is a pure delight - and we do it as the temptations overtake us, however we've not been to Paris before this trip (week of 5/10). We are waiting for faxed confirmation from the Hotel Champ de Mars. Thanks for your suggestion Donna about booking now. Any ideas what we will encounter (hotel & travel) during our visit to Brussels the preceeding week. This forum is great! Thanks for your help.
 
Old Jan 11th, 1999, 11:06 AM
  #15  
Kathy
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Just received confirmation from Hotel Champ de Mars. As you suggested, Elaine, this might help solicit more detailed information about eating in the nearby area - and what kind of breakfast the hotel offers. Thanks.
 

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