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Using Plastic in Britain Now Includes Spending Pounds...

Using Plastic in Britain Now Includes Spending Pounds...

Dec 19th, 2013, 07:18 AM
  #1  
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Using Plastic in Britain Now Includes Spending Pounds...

pound notes that is as Britain is joining other countries in abandoning paper (cotton in this case I guess) in favor of longer lasting plastic for its banknotes and that plastic note also provides for better embedded security threads, etc.

So in Britain using plastic will soon take on a new meaning besides using credit cards!

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/19/bu...ency.html?_r=0
PalenQ is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 08:43 AM
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Just got a new 100-dollar bill in the US yesterday, isn't that plastic?
michelhuebeli is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 08:45 AM
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Nope says the article U S ain't doing it - but that new Benjamin does indeed look like a different creature!
PalenQ is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 09:08 AM
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Just that it is not now...All of this is a few years away. As the t-shirt says Sit back and keep calm
ribeirasacra is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 09:20 AM
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I no longer have to handle low denomination pound notes that look like used tissue papers?
greg is online now  
Dec 19th, 2013, 10:09 AM
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they need to streamline the coinage as well - 1 pence, 2 pence, 5 pence, 10 pence, 20 pence, 50 pence, £1 and £2 - far too many coins
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Dec 19th, 2013, 10:24 AM
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I suspect but don't know anything authoritative that at some point the 1p and 2p coins will be history and all cash sales will be rounded to the nearest 5p. Canada recently did this and while it is not universal within euroland, as I understand at leat the Dutch have done this.
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Dec 19th, 2013, 10:45 AM
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well in most of euroland I rarely see any 1 or 2 euro cent coints - prices are rounded off and since there is no sales tax always ending in 0 or 5 - no need for 1 or 2 euro cents - only place I've got them are some supermarkets.
PalenQ is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 10:52 AM
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the experience of "euroland" will have little application to the UK,

the experience of Canada is far more pertinent now that Mark Carney is in charge of the Bank of England - maple syrup on the notes... eh??
sofarsogood is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 10:53 AM
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Yet again an indicator of something the USA is behind the times in.

I do have to say though that I hate the feel of Canada's new plastic notes. They just don't feel like 'money' somehow. They look good though.

Re the USA's 'new' $100 bill, the time on the clock on the reverse has changed. Did anybody notice? I kid you not.
dulciusexasperis is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 11:14 AM
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Are you all tax dodgers or something? The only people who have $100 bills where I live are contractors being paid off the books.

Seriously, I am in my late 60's and have had maybe 5 or 6 $100 bills pass through my hands in my entire lifetime.
Ackislander is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 12:03 PM
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Pence is the plural form of penny, so it's 1 penny, not 1 pence. ;-)

I've used plastic notes in Australia, and find them much better than filthy, worn-out paper notes.

Is there any other major economy that has paper notes worth as little as the US dollar? Isn't it about time the US did away with the $1 bill and forced the use of $1 coins? You could make room for it in the tills by doing away with the 1¢ coin.
Heimdall is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 12:51 PM
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Not exactly environmentally friendly.
hetismij2 is offline  
Dec 19th, 2013, 01:03 PM
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"Not exactly environmentally friendly."

What isn't? Paper or plastic?

And do you have a whole life environmental analysis to substantiate that assertion - or is it just the usual uninformed bigotry that comes as standard from the environmental lobby?
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Dec 19th, 2013, 01:13 PM
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Since the disappearance of the defunct silver dollar, there have been two attempts at introducing $1 coins in the US, both of which failed. And trying to get rid of the penny means changing virtually every price and sales tax table. Since no one expects anyone to round down, it would mean immediate price inflation. Long live the paper dollar and the Lincoln penny!
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Dec 19th, 2013, 01:23 PM
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Seriously, I am in my late 60's and have had maybe 5 or 6 $100 bills pass through my hands in my entire lifetime.>

now they're called Benjamins - like if you hear young kids talking about how many Benjamins they're going to make after college.
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Dec 19th, 2013, 01:44 PM
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US bases in England have done without the penny for years. All they do is round to the nearest nickel, and it evens out in the end. What could be more simple?

It all started when the 1¢ coin was exactly the same size as the old 6d, but worth much less. British vendors complained about finding US coins in their vending machines, so it was banned. After British coinage was decimalised in the early 70s the practice continued, and no one misses the US penny!

One US dollar in 1950 had about the same purchasing power as $10 today. That makes the $1 bill worth about 10¢ in 1950s money. When the £1 note was abolished in England, a few people grumbled, but soon got used to using the £1 coin. Americans are adaptable, and would accept the $1 coin if that were the only option.
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Dec 19th, 2013, 01:50 PM
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Americans are adaptable, and would accept the $1 coin if that were the only option.>

but politically that will never be the only option - the number of $1 coins Congress orders the mint to produce each year is staggering as are the height of the piles of such coins in vaults.

And come to think of it I'd rather have 7 one dollar bills in my wallet as I do now then 7 dollar coins that would probably be sitting in my change bucket.
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Dec 19th, 2013, 02:00 PM
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Actually Heimdall, there is a thread on flyer talk about this. You have to read some of the comments which would fly in the face of your conviction of just how adaptable Americans are. The reality is what has sabotaged the $1 coin in the USA is how ordinary looking it is and if you are visually impaired like I am, you can hardly see it is a different color than most of the other coins. What I like about the way Britain did it is the £1 coin cannot be mistaken for anything else. It is not all that big, true, but it is really thick and when I'm in Britain and on the very very few occasions I pay cash for something (and they are few and far between at least for me) when I reach into my pocket, I have no trouble figuring out which coin is the £1 coin (the 50p is easy too with its multi shaped feature). The £2 coin is not that thick but very very large.

Americans start complaining about having pockets ful of coins if ever we abolished the $1 bill. And then the whole argument starts about how the USA is the land of the free and government has no right to impose its will just because it would save the US treasury billions to scrap the $1 bill. Of course then again we're one of three countries (Liberia and Burma being the others) that have refused to adopt the metric system, we still use Farenheit for temperatures, we refuse to accept the fact that a single payer health system would be beneficial to most of the population, and of course then there are the insane gun laws. All in the name of "freedom". Some people are very very passionate about these things and basically claim it is none of the government's business.

And as far as paper currency is concerned, why are US bank notes all the same size and printed with the same drab color no matter the denomination?

You won't find any of these 21st century things coming to our shores in the near future, that's for sure. And that includes getting rid of the penny.
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Dec 19th, 2013, 02:04 PM
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BTW, it's not surprising the Susan B. Anthony $1 coin failed — although a little larger, it looked too much like a quarter. The Sacagawea dollar was gold in colour, but the same size as the Susan B. Apparently there are about 1 billion Sacagawea coins in circulation, but people seem to hold onto them as curiosities. I have one at home somewhere myself.
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