Trump and our trip to Spain

Aug 13th, 2016, 09:30 PM
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Trump and our trip to Spain

I know this is not the Lounge, but I have hearing about stories about Americans going to Europe and being tormented about Trump. Now we have been to Europe during the Vietnam and George W eras but this is not anger, this is ridicule and disbelief. One guy said an entire bar in Amsterdam broke into laughter when they learned he was an American.

I know our friends and relatives will be consumed by Trump. When we visit they want to discuss US matters in general. So I have prepared some answers in advance:

Sí , Trump es un mono naranja (Yes, Trump is an orange monkey.)

Sí, es una locura pero también lo es el tío José. (Yes, he is crazy but so is Uncle Carlos.)

Por favor, no me culpen , yo sólo vivo en los Estados Unidos . (Please do not blame me, I only live in the United States.)

¿Quieres que cante Oh Canadá?
IMDonehere is offline  
Aug 13th, 2016, 09:38 PM
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We were in Italy last month and people at the B&Bs were commenting...they’re aghast. We just agreed and had some scintillating conversations. This was a month before Brexit, so we talked about that, too.
Iwan2go is offline  
Aug 13th, 2016, 09:56 PM
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One of our cab drivers in London thought Trump was great and hopes he is elected. We politely asked what he found appealing but decided not to share our opinion in return.
Scootoir is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 01:53 AM
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When Bush was in power we often had Americans enter the house and without being promoted said "We did not vote for him!" We were amazed.
Personally would not worry about it. Spain has it's own political and financial problems.
ribeirasacra is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 03:04 AM
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Ribe, I understand that Spain has its own problem, but people want to discuss America with us.
IMDonehere is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 04:59 AM
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We were in Provence and Venice in early June, before the conventions; no one said a word to us. For which we were grateful. Now Brexit . . .
socaltraveler is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 05:08 AM
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A Scottish woman I met in Europe this summer said, a week after the Brexit vote, "you Americans better be careful, you don't think it can happen but it can" (she was referring to Trump getting elected). She said people in the UK didn't think Brexit would actually win, that people were just expressing dissatisfaction with the status quo but didn't really want to leave the EU and then look what happened. Americans better not get too complacent thinking that crazy Trump hasn't got a chance.
isabel is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 05:46 AM
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I'm relieved to know that European politicians are and have been so eminently sensible that the inhabitants of those countries can point fingers.
vincenzo32951 is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 05:58 AM
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I know it is hard for some to believe but folks that back Trump do have some legitimate concerns.......you could start by sharing those (if you are able to figure them out Then you can re-assure folks that is it is very likely he will not be our next president and sing the praises of Madame Hillary
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Aug 14th, 2016, 06:05 AM
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Trump and our trip to Spain
Posted by: IMDonehere on Aug 14, 16 at 12:30am
I know this is not the Lounge, but I have hearing about stories about Americans going to Europe and being tormented about Trump. Now we have been to Europe during the Vietnam and George W eras but this is not anger, this is ridicule and disbelief. One guy said an entire bar in Amsterdam broke into laughter when they learned he was an American.


This is nothing new, especially for Holland. I lived in Haarlem during the Ford/Carter years. America's "sins" were the top topic in my local cafe every evening. That's the way they are educated, socialism and communism now and forever. One guy in an Amsterdam cafe went berserk when he learned that I am an American, literally stomping around and screaming that I was a CIA agent. Jimmy Carter was held in low regard and was typically called the "Peanut President." Ford was a fuzz and was overlooked by heated discussions of the Vietnam War (then concluded), civil rights, native Americans, and other issues that had nothing to do with Holland.

I also lived in Paris during the Reagan years. That was a different story. The French I met generally held him in good regard, especially after he punched Libya with the bombing of Libya.

My final retort to the Dutch who couldn't restrain themselves was to announce that "The Americans won't be coming over for your next war." The response was utter silence as they reflected on WW2 and the service and sacrifice of the US Army in liberating them from Nazi Hell.

My Dutch friends are in horror that Donald Trump might become President. I suspect that part of the concern over Donald Trump is his approach to NATO. He has said that there will be no more free ride for Europe. They must pay for their own defense with their own cash, and blood when the Russians invade. I agree with Trump on this issue. American taxpayers have done enough for the "Allies."
spaarne is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 06:19 AM
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<< We were in Italy last month and people at the B&Bs were commenting...they’re aghast. >>

Were they Italian? If so, they elected Berlusconi.
Mimar is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 06:56 AM
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Generally, Europeans only care about the foreign policy of other countries, particularly the United States, which is why some 'bad' presidents were appreciated (Nixon comes to mind) and some of the 'good' ones were considered to be of no interest.

Trump has already made some rather alarming foreign policy statements, and the fact that basically only Russia and North Korea have approved of them could be considered a cause for concern. As for what he would do to 'Americans in America' nobody really gives a damn.
kerouac is online now  
Aug 14th, 2016, 07:00 AM
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I am saying I am Canadian. I remember on a trip when Clinton was in office and we had agreed not to talk politics to anyone but when they would hear our accent they wanted to talk about Monica. Opening line "she sure was smart to keep that blue dress" I have had people say some awful things about us and I just smh. My group this next trip is diverse. Two gay democrat girls supporting Hillary, one Republican and one undecided and me the progressive. We try and not discuss it but pubs always bring out the questions from locals.
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Aug 14th, 2016, 07:50 AM
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I was in the UK over Easter this year and a man stopped both me and my mom in a park when he heard our accents. He wanted to talk US politics and especially Trump and proceeded to tell us how to vote. I kept my mouth shut for the first part of the conversation but finally couldn't take it anymore. I told him I think he should worry first about his politics and how his country votes and quickly made an exit. Brexit followed.

I don't like talking about religion or politics when I travel. I try and keep my mouth shut as much as possible when I am forced into it.
sassy27 is online now  
Aug 14th, 2016, 08:23 AM
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Sorry, but unlike that Brexit vote which is not binding the election here, unless somehow contested/stolen and so forth is pretty much permanent. I suppose you could say people who vote for Trump are also "dissatisfied with the status quo but really didn't want to end up paying higher prices for Chinese goods at Wal-Mart."
Dukey1 is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 08:25 AM
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I guess you have to see it from a European perspective sometimes, Trump is on the web every day and on the TV every day, normally the comedy channels, but every day it becomes part of their life, so when a real life American comes along...

That the people who support Trump have a some issues is certainly true. What seems to be odd that there is any connection between what the solution is to their issues and what Trump is offering.

Since it has become apparent that many of the people who voted for Brexit do not understand why or indeed what they voted for, don't assume something similar will not happen in the US.
bilboburgler is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 09:34 AM
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bil: >>I guess you have to see it from a European perspective sometimes, Trump is on the web every day and on the TV every day, normally the comedy channels, but every day it becomes part of their life, so when a real life American comes along...<<

... said Europeans feel compelled to lecture said real-life American about the issue? Please.

I do understand, and have experienced, Europeans' inordinate fascination with American politics. What I don't understand is the European attitude of "I saw it on TV, and so I know a lot about it." In fact, it comes across on this forum occasionally.
vincenzo32951 is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 09:45 AM
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No one ever lectured me about US politics while we lived in France.

They asked intelligent questions and were genuinely interested in our responses. Have to say they became friendlier and more animated when they realized we were Obama supporters.
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Aug 14th, 2016, 09:46 AM
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I do understand, and have experienced, Europeans' inordinate fascination with American politics. What I don't understand is the European attitude of "I saw it on TV, and so I know a lot about it." .>>

perhaps they are taking a leaf out of a certain presidential candidate's book, Dukey?

Honestly, in a world where we are all affected by the economic and policies of the main powers, you cannot expect people not to have opinions, particularly as whether we like it or not, the outcome of the US elections has potentially profound implications for the rest of us. What is wrong with asking someone how they intend to vote and why? you don't have to answer.
annhig is offline  
Aug 14th, 2016, 09:47 AM
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BTW, IMDonhere, your uncle seemed to change his name, unless Carlos is the english translation of José!
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