Trip Report -- Munich May 2019

Jul 8th, 2019, 08:56 AM
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Trip Report -- Munich May 2019

This is a continuation of my trip report that started in Krakow, Poland. (link to trip report for that part of the trip)

Iíve been to Germany twice before, to Cologne and Berlin/Dresden. I canít say Iím in love with Germany but Iím interested enough to go back. Munich had been on my list for a few reasons (Dachau, Neuschwanstein and various museums) and when I saw that there was a Caravaggio exhibition on in Munich when I was looking for some place else to go after Krakow in early May, I decided on Munich.

After 5 days in Krakow, I was heading for Munich. (All pics below are from my iPhone, better, larger sized photos are on my good camera and can't be uploaded here without resizing)

Day One

My pre-arranged transfer to the airport came early (which is good, as Iím chronically early) and getting to the one-terminal airport with 90 minutes to spare was nice. I managed to fit in some shopping in the terminals. It was a bit odd though, absolutely no one ever checked my passport along the way through the airport. I had it out at every stop and no one looked at it. Yikes.

I took the S-Bahn from Munich airport to Marienplatz, which was a 38 minute trip and landed me right next to (literally!) my hotel, the Hotel Schlicker. Iíve never been so conveniently located! Iím right off the square (about 400 steps from the S-bahn exit) where the two city halls are and convenient to underground. My room was ready at the hotel and I unpacked a bit, threw on another layer (it was cold here!) and headed out.

I did Rick Stevesí Munich city walking tour on my own. This time I did it audio style on my iPhone rather than read along. It went well, although the directions were a bit convoluted a few times. But I learned so much. On the main square, there is Old City Hall (Alte Rathaus) and New City Hall (Neue Rathaus). Except Old City Hall is newer than New City Hall. Much of Munich was leveled by bombing in WWII, except in the square, the Old City Hall was mostly destroyed while New City Hall survived a lot of the hits and the city rebuilt Old City Hall making it newer than New City Hall. A lot to follow, I know. But several of the churches I visited were leveled, or nearly so, by bombing and reconstructed fairly quickly, relatively speaking. It gives me hope that Paris can do the same with Notre Dame which was far less damaged than these churches! A few of these churches had before and after photos from just after the bombings through the reconstruction and it is simply amazing how they rebuilt here.




The walking tour led me past and through most of the churches around the square. One was the home church of Cardinal Ratzinger turned Pope Benedict (so now Iíve been in the home churches of both of the previous two popes). Another had many of the tombs of the German royal families, including King Otto and Mad King Ludwig. The styles of the churches varied greatly from Jesuit to Catholic, Baroque to NeoClassical to Renaissance. An interesting side-note is that my hotel is surrounded by 5 churches, all of which ring bells on the hour 24 hours a day. I thought to myself that this ought to make for interesting sleeping, but really only came into play if I slept late or tried to nap.

One of my more interesting stops was to Dallmayr, which is a giant, high-end food hall that caters to the Munich elite. It has everything from chocolate and wine and spirits to prepared foods, teas and coffees. Yes, I did some damage there, but Iím none worse for the wear.

The walking tour looped around (but didnít visit) Residenz, which was the former royal familyís winter home right in the city (Nymphenburg Palace was their summer home) and ended up in the Odeonplatz, which is the square where Hitler and Goering held an uprising, both got shot, Hitler got arrested and spent 9 months in prison writing Mein Kampf. Right before the square there was a small lane to the left that had a wavy trail of golden bricks through it. That was the last spot where Germans could duck through to avoid having to enter the square and give a Heil to Hitler on that day.

For dinner I popped into a beer hall across the street from the hotel (Schneider Brauhaus im Tal) that had a fair number of vegetarian offerings on the menu. It was seat yourself so as a party of one I tried to find the smallest vacant table I could, and that was a table for four, unfortunately. The server wasnít pleased by that and she let me know. The service was not really great but the food was good. In all the market stalls I passed on the street today, it was obvious that white asparagus was very much in season. So my main was white asparagus and boiled potatoes with a Hollandaise sauce on the side. My starter was called obatzda, and it was a blend of three cheeses and some spices and butter into a spreadable cheese that you put on a pretzel or bread. It was really good. I had apple fritters for dessert.

I did another loop around the square but at 8:00 it wasnít even close to dark enough for the buildings to be lit up yet. Maybe another night...

I really liked the Hotel Schlicker This is super-convenient for sightseeing as well as getting to/from the airport on the S-bahn very easily (take the D exit to the hotel). You can easily walk to just about anywhere else in this part of the city without needing public transportation. I had a single room and while small with just a twin bed, it had everything I needed. I faced the back of the hotel, which is great because of no street noise, but travelers should know there are a bunch of churches in the area that ring their bells...a lot! This is not unique to the Schlicker, but if you like to go to bed early or sleep late, it's hard not to hear them! The room was comfortable, warm or cool enough as needed. Housekeeping was very efficient. The bathroom and shower were small but just enough for one person. Everything was clean and tidy. The room has a small fridge with mini-bar. I bought my own water and snacks to keep in there, which is handy. Breakfast is served in a large room in an adjacent building. Availability was good on weekdays but a little tight on Saturday. Good offerings with a wide array of foods. The breakfast staff were efficient. Front desk staff are very friendly and speak excellent English. They were very diligent in making sure I was who I said I was when I requested my key each day, which is a good security policy, especially when I'm traveling alone.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 08:58 AM
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Day Two
This day ended up being a bit rocky. As I was writing my blog the previous night, I felt myself falling victim to some sort of traveler’s ailment and ended up sleeping most of the day away. But I did go out for a bit mid-morning into the afternoon.

I did manage to get out and not make a total waste of the day though. I took a cab to Alte Pinakothek primarily to see their Caravaggio exhibition. This was meant to show how the Utrecht school of painters were influenced by Caravaggio. I think it did that well enough, except the focus was beyond just the Utrecht Caravaggist painters, because one of my favorites, Valentin de Boulogne was well-featured and I’m pretty sure he is French (he is). Gerhardt von Honthorst was also featured and I became a big fan of his many years back when we saw an exhibition on him in Florence. The collection of paintings they had was excellent and the program definitely delivered on the theme, but the layout was miserable. The space was adjoining boxes that you could easily skip past without realizing it. Crowd control and a bunch of confused senior citizens really made it hard to move around. But other than that I’m really glad I saw it. There were only 4 actual Caravaggios in the show, as is likely to happen with a big name like this. One from the Vatican Museum (which I’d seen in Rome, but I was surprised they loaned it out for this!), one from Montserrat (which I’d likely never see otherwise), a Medusa shield from the Uffizi which I’d seen before, and The Fortune Teller from the Capitoline Museum, which I’d also seen.

After that show, I strolled through the permanent collection which had a couple of nice highlights like a da Vinci portrait, a nice Botticelli, and some Rembrandts, including a cycle of Jesus’ life, which were excellent. But man, there were more Reubens there than I’ve ever seen in any museum. Ugh.

After that I still felt ok so wandered over to the Nazi Documentation Center nearby. (The Neue Pinakothek is closed for the year so no luck in seeing Impressionists collection here). The Nazi Documentation Center chronicles the rise of the Nazi Party and Hitler, all of which happened here in Munich. It’s not a claim to fame at all, and they are not celebrating it. They are quite clearly documenting it in extreme detail, probably to ensure it doesn’t happen again. I found it interesting that admission is free this month due to a large EU election happening at the end of the month; probably encouraging people to visit to remember what happens when you vote the wrong way. There were a few school groups there doing presentations on various exhibits.

The one thing about this place is that it would require HOURS to read it all. Every panel was text-heavy. There were table displays that were all text and 31 tall floor panels that were a lot of text, plus the excellent audio-guide that went into way more detail on each one. I wanted to read it all and listen to it all but I started to lose energy and felt rotten again so I got through as much as I could before I headed back to the hotel, where I slept the rest of the day away. I will say that what I did make it through was well worth the effort for people interested in that point in history. Definitely take one of the portable seats available to all guests though if you go. It’s a lot of standing around while reading otherwise!
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Jul 8th, 2019, 08:59 AM
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Day Three
Today I was feeling better so had the hotel breakfast (included) and headed out again. This time I decided to tour the Residenz, which was home to kings and royalty from the 1300s until 1918. I did both the main residence and the treasury tours and they were pretty good. I don’t normally find treasuries terribly interesting but some of the pieces in this one were really beautiful and ostentatious. I was surprised by how many stones had been replaced with colored glass in order to sell the original stones for money. Yikes. It was also interesting how many pieces came from other royal families and weren’t returned for any reason.

The residence was opulent of course, but it, like so much else of Munich, was hit hard in WWII and had to be reconstructed. If there were photos of what ceiling paintings looked like, they were repainted but if there weren’t, they were left black. Almost none of the furnishings are original to the palace, but I think you can still get a good idea of how they lived.

After this I grabbed a yogurt and a pretzel for lunch and then walked around the Marienplatz area more or less window shopping and people watching. I rested the rest of the day and grabbed a slice of pizza for dinner. I wanted something substantive but was a little afraid of German food again. It hit the spot and thankfully agreed with me.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 09:05 AM
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Day Four
Up and at ‘em bright and early today. I was to be “on the bus” at the main train station by 8:10 for an 8:30 departure. While I was fairly certain those were somewhat fluid times, as it always seems to be, I also wondered if German promptness would reign supreme and that thought was tucked away in the back of my mind. I made it to the bus with just 7 minutes to spare and was not by any means the last to arrive.

After the cattle car of the last bus tour I took (Cracow City Tour’s Auschwitz tour in Krakow), I was relieved to remember that I’d paid for the “premium” tour to Neuschwanstein and Linderhof. I knew that meant a smaller group, snacks and a bathroom on board and better service. I had to smile when I walked up to a line of big Gray Line coaches and only one had a red carpet rolled out from its staircase. That was mine! The coach was huge but had half the number of seats. Lots of legroom and a cappuccino bar to start! Snacks like chocolate and cookies and pretzels and bananas were constantly being offered. Bottled water and coffee flowing freely. This, THIS my friends, is how to do a bus tour. And it was worth whatever it was that I paid extra for it. There were only 19 of us, so everyone got a window and there were fewer of us to keep on schedule.

Annette was our tour guide and she laid down the law from the start. Lack of promptness will not be tolerated. The bus will leave without you if you are not there at the appointed time (and yes, she’s done that before!). Duly noted, we all said. And off we went.

It was about an hour and 15 minutes to Neuschwanstein. This is probably the most famous of Mad King Ludwig’s three castles he built during his short reign (Linderhof and Herrenchiemsee being the others; we’d see Linderhof later today). Ludwig was never really into the king thing. His parents thought he’d grow into the role, but he was a dreamer and not very serious about what he needed to know to be king. He never married or had children and was passionate about the composer Wagner and his operas. His father died when he was 18 and he took the throne and apparently hated it. He devoted his life to building these castles. He designed and decorated them himself. By all accounts he was a great boss, forming the first trade union for his workers. Only the architects feared him for all the changes he’d make once they’d finalized plans. The government grew tired of him spending money on the buildings and not doing much work, so they declared him insane and ultimately, at the age of 40, he was found drowned in a knee-deep lake along with his doctor. That’s sort of suspect given that he was a great swimmer. The exhumation of his body to determine an exact cause of death was refused and the “official” story is that he killed himself, although the circumstances certainly lend themselves to another ending.

Anyway, we could first see Neuschwanstein as we wound our way through the beautiful Bavarian Alps and down into the flat near the town. At first I was struck by how small it looked, but I truly think that was in comparison to the massive mountains it was set against. It has 200 rooms, only 18 of which were actually finished.

We parked in the lower lot under Hohenschwangau, Ludwig’s father’s castle. We wouldn’t visit this one today, but in retrospect I don’t think that’s a bad decision. More on that in a bit. Annette said that given how gorgeous the day was, with bright blue sky, sunshine and white puffy clouds we really ought to go up to the bridge for that quintessential Neuschwanstein photo. Of course I was going to. So rather than walk the 40 minutes up (we only had an hour to make it to our assigned tour time), I took the shuttle bus which took only 10 minutes to where the trail to the bridge is. I have to say, it was one of those travel moments that can either disappoint you incredibly or be better than you imagined. For me, it was far, far better than I expected. And the interior was even better!







This is Marienbrucke, the bridge from which the first two photos above were taken:



“The bridge” is Marienbrucke, which is a wooden footbridge that crosses a pretty deep chasm nearby the castle. I hadn’t thought too much about it until I saw it and didn’t have too much time for my vertigo to set in before I was halfway across and taking photos. I didn’t dare get close to the edge or look down, I was there to get my business done and get off before too many other people got on. But man, it was an incredible sight. The weather was indeed perfect for this part of the journey and I’m thrilled the weather gods smiled down on me for this part of the day!

It only took 10 minutes to walk down to the entrance to the castle. While waiting at the turnstyles for our appointed tour time, I looked across the chasm to see the bridge and realized that good glory, that is damn high, and precarious looking! I’m glad I didn’t see it from that angle before I went!

The tour of the interior of the castle was crazy. First, it was just as well-organized as the Salt Mines tour last week: regimented and strict tour times, no dallying. We went in at 12:10 on the dot. It did not take long to be completely awestruck by the interior design of this place. Ludwig knew nothing about restraint. If he wanted gilding or 10 colors or feathers or fabric, he did it. He held nothing back. He painted rooms to match Wagner’s operas, he built a hallway like a grotto from one too. His chandeliers were massive and beyond anything I’d ever seen before. It was as if he’d decorated it all on a sugar high. And I loved it. All too quickly the tour was over (no photos allowed) and we had about 40 minutes to make it to the bus. It was a 20 minute walk down from the castle. I grabbed a cheesey pretzel and off I went.

To put the size of Neuschwanstein in perspective, the guide said that the Nazis used it to store their stolen art (that the Monuments Men recovered). They found 9000 boxes of art stored here. That’s a whole heck of a lot of art and just goes to show how much room there is there for all that!

Oberammergau was our next stop, really because it’s a nice mid-point between Neuschwanstein and Linderhof. I’d heard about it from travel research over the years and was perversely curious. The town is best known for its commitment to hold the Passion Play every 10 years here. During the Plague, the townspeople made a deal with God that if they don’t all die from the Black Death they’d do the play every year. Over time “yearly” became every 5 years became every 10 years. Now it’s such a draw that they built a huge open air theater with a sliding glass roof to cover the stage in inclement weather. They run the play for several months, 5 days a week. The theater holds 4800 people who sit there for 6 hours watching this play! Crazy.

Anyway, I didn’t think much of Oberammergau to be honest. I liked the story about the tiny cross at the top of the mountain and how on Mad King Ludwig’s birthday, they’d climb up there and light a bonfire in his honor (normal citizens seemed, and still seem, to like Ludwig better than his colleagues did). But the town is really touristy. The buildings are pretty but everything is a shop selling tourist stuff. LOTS of Christmas stuff, wood carvings, cow bells. We only had 40 minutes here, so I walked to the little church where the Passion Play was first held and back again. Then back on the bus.

20 minutes later and we were at Linderhof. This castle is meant to be a smaller version of Versailles, and it is indeed small when compared to Neuschwanstein. But still exquisite. The exterior appeared to be carved marble with classical statues. Inside had Ludwig’s sugar-high, unrestrained hand all over it. I couldn’t help but think of the Coco Chanel saying about how you should always look in the mirror before you leave the house and take one accessory off. I think Ludwig was the type to put a few more on. He just did everything over the top. It’s like if a little kid were allowed to design it, no holds barred, no questions asked. The most breathtaking room was the last, his hall of mirrors, which was gorgeous. There was one spot where you stood and it appeared as if the room went on forever in either direction, which was of course the effect of the mirrors. But lost in all the gilded carvings and ornamentation were the 90 vases propped among them. I’d have missed them entirely if the guide didn’t point them out. Crazy.

It was under renovation, don't mind the crane...



Back to the bus again and the driver offered us our choice of beer or wine. So we got to enjoy a tipple on the drive back to Munich. Yes, I think this is truly the way to do the bus tours!

I was back in Munich by 6:15 and after much deliberation I decided not to visit Dachau tomorrow but instead take a train ride to Salzburg. I had a hard time recovering emotionally from Auschwitz last week and I think I want to end my trip on an emotional high note. So I bought my train ticket while I was at the train station. I opted not to buy the Bayern ticket which, while being cheaper, would have had me arrive far later than I wanted to. I don’t believe on cheaping out on things that are more convenient or could get me more time on the ground on a day trip.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 09:14 AM
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Day Five

The last day of this epic vacation was finally upon me. Honestly, Toronto (where I'd been the weekend before I left for Krakow) and Krakow both seemed like months ago and it felt like I hadn’t been home for a year. I think that’s the sign of a good vacation?

I didn’t sleep long last night. I was up before 6:00 just waiting for the alarm. With my train tickets in hand, I went off to Hauptbanhof today and all transiting went off without a hitch. I left here at 8:00 and was seated in my seat on the train by 8:20. Go figure. It was a quick 1 hour 45 minute ride to Salzburg. I left my hotel in blue skies and sun, left the Munich train station in overcast and it remained overcast for the entire journey. The weather situation here is quite changeable quite quickly. Even though it looked gloomy I had a hunch if I waited long enough I’d see some sun.

I arrived at the Salzburg train station, exited and bought a bus ticket out front. 4 stops to the river and I got out to walk across. From the bridge, you get a great view of the Old Town, with all its church spires and steeples and the fortress up on the hill. It was really quite pretty. The Old Town itself isn’t terribly big; it’s maybe 4 or 5 streets deep and if it’s a mile long, that’d be a lot. It’s the interlocking squares that make it fun to stroll around. I started the journey in the overcast and wet sidewalks, rain having just passed through, following Rick Steves’ audio tour again (makes it easier than reading while walking) and saw most of the main sights in the Old Town, then got hungry and decided to find a place for lunch.

Views from the bridge:





Salzburg Cathedral...if you stand in just the right spot you can have the angels holding the golden crown on the facade crown the statue of Mary in front of the building...




I ate my big meal of the day here at Zipfer Bierhaus on Sigmund Haffner Gasse, and it was excellent. I had cheese dumplings, which was basically like macaroni and cheese only it had fried onions on the top, which really just made it perfect. There was a side salad too, which I picked at but couldn’t finish. The waiter was deaf and had trouble hearing me, but he yelled at me about getting a Muscat rather than a Riesling, and I was fine with that. I’d have ordered dessert there but I really didn’t want the whole joint hearing what a glutton I am while on vacation.

I went back out to walk some more, picked up a three-pack of Mozart balls (like Lindt chocolate truffles) and strolled. I found a cemetery shared by five churches and it was tiny and oh so peaceful. The graves were very well taken care of, but I learned that they are on 10 year leases and if they’re not paid up and taken care of, the inhabitants are dug up and booted out. There was one interesting grave of an American army sergeant who appears to have died there during WWII, and his wife. It’d be interesting to know that story.

By now the overcast was nearly gone and I could see blue sky and strong sun, so I retraced my steps and retook some of the photos from earlier on the bridge only now with blue skies. It got so warm that I shed my jacket and was glad I opted not to wear extra layers this morning. I definitely didn’t need them.

I took the funicular up to the fortress and was figuratively knocked off my feet by the spectacular view of the Alps from the back-side of the fortress. There is a panoramic terrace up there and I had no idea we were that close to those snow-covered peaks. I don’t think I’ve ever been that near to the mountains like that, so I took time to really appreciate that. There was a storm coming in over them which reminded me of what it is like to watch the storms creeping across the savannah in Africa. I could just see it coming right toward the city.





I slipped around to the town-side of the terrace and was struck by that view as well. Salzburg really is something to behold, but especially from up high. It really is picture-perfect. And I don’t say that about many places!

More strolling and window-shopping for a while and stopping to listen to a couple of buskers, including a 4-piece tuba oompa band, until I’d made enough room for dessert. I stopped in to Cafe Mozart (how touristy can you get in his birthplace anyway?) and had a slice of apple strudel with ice cream and a cappuccino. A delightful way to end the daytrip. All in all I’m really glad I chose to do this on my last day. It was a refreshing, relaxing way to wrap it all up.

I hopped back on bus #1 and headed back to the train station, ready to depart at 4:55 p.m. It was a quick and efficient trip back to Munich where I’d pack up and be ready to leave early the next day.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 09:22 AM
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You convinced me about the value of the premium bus trip!
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Jul 8th, 2019, 09:58 AM
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Do you have a link to the bus? I have been to both but maybe they do some other trips. Great trip report.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Macross View Post
Do you have a link to the bus? I have been to both but maybe they do some other trips. Great trip report.
hi macross, it was just an offering by Grayline. Their site for Munich is here: https://www.stadtrundfahrten-muenchen.de/en/homepage/ Iím on my phone so I hope that works!
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Jul 8th, 2019, 01:10 PM
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LOVE travelling with you! Thanks for posting!
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Jul 8th, 2019, 01:22 PM
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That is the only prem tour. I am saving for friends. The only way I would do it. I was amazed by the piano he had made for Wagner. Ugly but so him. We are very close to your hotel for Christmas. Great location.
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Jul 8th, 2019, 04:57 PM
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Glad to share the existence of the Premium tour to Neuschwanstein. I loathe coach tours but figured this was the least hassle free way to see what I wanted. It ended up being the best splurge I made on the trip. I’d take a lot more coach trips if they were like that!
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Jul 8th, 2019, 08:14 PM
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Hi Amy,

Thanks for posting your trip report, and I love your photos! I live close/ish to Munich, though I rarely get there. Your report has me planning a visit there, doing a good tour so that I get to understand more of its history, so thanks so much for that!

You don't mention the surfers... my US visitors usually want to see them... did they interest you at all?

Thanks again for posting!

s
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Jul 9th, 2019, 03:47 AM
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I was impressed you found shirkers alley. My husband loves finding all those places.
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Jul 9th, 2019, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by swandav2000 View Post
You don't mention the surfers... my US visitors usually want to see them... did they interest you at all?
s
I'll be honest, I don't know what the surfers are in Munich!

Originally Posted by Macross View Post
I was impressed you found shirkers alley. My husband loves finding all those places.
Thank Rick Steves' walking tour for that. I think had I not had either the guidebook or the audio guide and followed it, I would have walked past saying "oh, nice golden bricks on that sidewalk"!
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Jul 9th, 2019, 06:23 AM
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Enjoyed your report Amy. I've been to Munich many times and have just booked a trip to Germany and Austria in December with my niece. It'll be her first time, so she might be interested in the walking tour you mentioned. I've also noted that restaurant in Salzburg as we'll be spending four nights there as well.

Re: surfing:
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Jul 9th, 2019, 07:06 AM
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swandav2000--We watched the surfers when we were there. They were fun to watch! We spent that day riding bikes through the English Garden and beyond, so happened upon the surfers without planning it.
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Jul 9th, 2019, 11:17 AM
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Interesting! I didn't know about it. I probably wouldn't have sought it out but if I stumbled upon it might have watched!
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Jul 12th, 2019, 04:33 AM
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To paraphrase our OP,
This, THIS my friends, is how to do a trip report!

Thank you Amy~
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Jul 12th, 2019, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by VonVan View Post
To paraphrase our OP,
This, THIS my friends, is how to do a trip report!

Thank you Amy~
Thank you for reading!
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