Training Italy, Switzerland, Austria

Dec 19th, 2011, 06:35 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 4,266
One comment about the bags that have four wheels vs the more common two wheels. The four wheeled bags are great when the surface is smooth - airports and the like. But when the going is a bit rougher - like cobbled pavements, common in Europe - then I think that the two wheeled bags are easier to move.

The steps onto trains are about as steep as the steps onto the double decker suburban train carriages that you may have seen in Sydney. Generally three steps, I recollect.
Peter_S_Aus is offline  
Dec 19th, 2011, 07:01 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 7,138
Greg, I checked out that rollaboard you recommended. (Looking for a new one.) At 10 pounds, it's on the heavy side. One should be able to find something around 6 pounds.
Mimar is offline  
Dec 19th, 2011, 07:27 PM
  #23  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
I'm still researching.
PalenQ - my research seems to say that you can get luggage direct to hotel which was a consideration which I was keen to establish. Then I need to establish which accommodations would accept it. Research of mobility services in Italy, Switzerland and Austria through their train sites is revealing re services/timeframe (options) cost etc. I too wondered why this service would be available because of terriorist threats. Perhaps because this service is so vital in Switzerland for moving all that skiing equipment about!

zeppole - I agree that I would definitely phone to double check. Shall wait until I have done some planning so I can ask all my questions.

Peter S Aus - The big decision re 4 wheel or 2 wheel. It may be that the larger item be 4 wheel so that I can navigate airports etc and the smaller one 2 wheel. Probably also depends on the size and robustness of the wheels and whether that larger item will travel to a hotel or whatever without my assistance. Sounds like you could be an Aussie. As regards the steps onto the trains, if only there was a picture of them somewhere. Have not been on steps in Sydney. Watching "Grand Tour" on TV last night I did see steps on a train (Swiss I think) and they would be easy for me to navigate. Just wondering if they represented the worst case scenario. What I should do is go across the road and ask my young Italian descent neighbour. Maybe she has been to Italy.

Thanks all for continuing to educate me.
2012moving is offline  
Dec 19th, 2011, 09:14 PM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 24,773
You can get some idea of the height from the platform to the train here: http://seat61.com/Italy.htm and scroll down. (Ignore the Orient Express pictures.)

I really urge you to listen to the "pack light" brigade. Unless you have an awful lot of pharma stuff you should be able to manage with one 21-inch and one medium daypack, I travel for months with just that. And don't fall for the hybrid backpacks with wheels, you don't need the extra weight of the wheels if you need a backpack.

You also might find some useful links here: http://www.ricksteves.com/plan/tips/easyaccess.htm
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 19th, 2011, 10:11 PM
  #25  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
thursdaysd - thanks, was aware of ricksteves. Believe me I am extremely motivated to pack light. Possibly more motivated than most because of my limitations. My daypack will need to be wheeled because my body can sustain weight for only brief period (eg getting on & off transport) and even then a backpack is likely to become a front pack! I think I've been spooked by Vienna in 2007. Travelling with my husband (since deceased) recovering from major abdo surgery, on Vienna station at airport, surprised by height from platform (no steps), big luggage because of family wedding in Austrian village - the only thing I had not considered! A friend is currently training Japan with a 4 wheeler but probably no cobblestones.
2012moving is offline  
Dec 19th, 2011, 11:06 PM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,851
Here is a slideshow using one technique to pack into a carry-on:
http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/201...6-pack-ss.html

We don't pack this heavy. My wife packs less than half the garments shown in the demo for even longer trips.

When is the weight of the daypack an issue: when traveling with your luggage or when taking day trips without luggage?
greg is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 04:30 AM
  #27  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
Thanks Greg. I used that packing method in 2007 to Austria for a wedding. Worked like a charm-even for a wedding (stepson posh wedding in a castle, including wedding present!) Not only does it save space but you can find things easily and not disrupt things to get hold of them. With good management my daypack will simply comprise some carry-on essentials (things I would keep with me at all times) plus items I would extract from my luggage to spend an extra day or so away from my luggage. A change of clothes to keep clean and dry. I'm not fussy. So it's when I am travelling without my luggage.
2012moving is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 07:29 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,851
So the question then is, are you planning to do overnight trips with only a daypack for THIS trip? I think a daypack with wheels alone would probably be 4 pounds or more empty vs. something like this http://travelstore.ricksteves.com/ca...rentId=8&id=40 at 9oz empty. Think about your daypack usage model and decide if you need all the items or items in that particular size/weight. I see people carrying thick hardcover book(s!) and a large Nalgene type of bottle full of water in a daypack as opposed to paperback/Kindle and a pint size disposable bottle. Of course, everyone has different needs, but I think there are ways to manage weight without foregoing any of the essentials. I sequence the reading material so that I read books only available in hardcover at home. I take only a Kindle or paperback version on trips. Over time, I converted clothes mostly to quick-dry type. They are usually lighter and less bulky. In addition to reduction in weight and volume, I carry less of them for the triple benefit, because I can wash as I go, and I carry less laundries.

If you can reduce the daypack content weight, then you no longer need wheels and that again will further reduce the weight by perhaps another few pounds.
greg is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 12:45 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 77,831
folks who struggle physically will always have other passengers IMO help them out and up into the train and down, etc. and will help you hoist luggage up into racks, etc.
PalenQ is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 04:07 PM
  #30  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
Greg thanks. I had already decided to Kindle it and I absolutly agree with quick-dry clothing and disposable bottles.

I am thinking along the lines of rick steve's autobahn rollon/backpack. Has anyone used one?

I really do need the security of the option of wheels because of my feet, back and shoulder. Don't want to find myself unable to walk at all because I have had too much weight on my feet for too long. Had intended to also pack something like the backpack you are suggesting into my check-in luggage in case I am able to use it. Then I pack my rollon/backpack into my other luggage and forward it on in one piece. But backpacks also stir up my left shoulder in the process of getting them on/off - range of motion issue. I have developed strategies for working around limitations and often this means avoiding repetitive stress, which is why options are good news.
Palenq - sounds good. I am trying to set myself up so I am not relying on the good will of strangers. Also somewhat spooked by the news on this site recently from traveller whose backpack vanished in a flash when she had leant it against her leg - in Switzerland? Lost everything.

I have many things to consider. For example I will need to check whether I can take my TENS in carryon luggage without it being viewed as a potential bomb! And (for heaven's sake!) my walking stick seat which functions as a stick and a seat to sit on. This is not a shooting stick. Great for queues, travel strikes, volcanic ash holdups, waiting for trains, outdoor concerts, admiring the view, people watching etc It's very comforting to know that you can sit down anytime, anywhere you need to on a seat that's the correct height.

Hoping I don't sound like a decrepit hypochondriac. I'm actually a very positive person who is aware of my limitations and who is appreciating all of your input. You are confirming my thoughts on many things and raising issues I had not considered.
Thanks all.
2012moving is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 04:26 PM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 24,773
WRT to the theft in Switzerland - wear a money belt!!! There's no reason she should have lost all the money/cards etc. even if she lost the bag. And she shouldn't have lost the bag either - if she wasn't wearing it she should have had a leg through the strap.

I travel with a collapsible hiking stick that just fits diagonally into my bigger bag, which I check for flights, but not sure that will work for a stick seat. If not, maybe you can gate check it.
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 07:39 PM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,911
2012moving,
This illustrated introduction to European trains http://tinyurl.com/eym5b may be of interest to you.
A wheeled 21/22" bag plus a shoulder bag is all you need, as pointed out by several people above. You can strap your shoulder bag to the handle of your wheeled luggage with a bungee cord and not need to carry anything. Except keep your money and documents in your pockets at all times, especially in train stations and on trains.
spaarne is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 07:46 PM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 24,773
"Except keep your money and documents in your pockets at all times" Money belt. Not pockets.
thursdaysd is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 11:03 PM
  #34  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
thursdaysd - I agree with the money belt and keeping your leg through the strap. I do it myself. A disabled person looks like a wonderful soft target.
spaarne - Thanks. Have that train travel info site now. Loved this "Don't stick your head out the window either, unless there is nothing in it."
2012moving is offline  
Dec 20th, 2011, 11:14 PM
  #35  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
I won't pass the best dressed list in Europe in my Keen Men's Targhee II mid hiking boots, but they will keep me walking!
2012moving is offline  
Dec 21st, 2011, 05:19 PM
  #36  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 165
Because of advice from Fodorites have decided to do a practice run to Canberra (Australia) for Renaissance Art Exhibition (amongst other things). Good chance to practise on Sydney train steps. Also seeking a site (Sydney and/or Canberra) for rough cobblestones. Can anyone suggest?
Thanks
2012moving is offline  
Dec 23rd, 2011, 10:40 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 77,831
anyone mobility challenged should DEFINITELY go first class on trains!
PalenQ is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:06 PM.