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tickets to london soccer match

Old Nov 8th, 2004, 04:58 PM
  #1  
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tickets to london soccer match

Does anyone know how to get tickets to a local soccer/football match? I'm not having much luck online. Thanks.
ld8989 is offline  
Old Nov 9th, 2004, 10:33 PM
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Have you tried ticketmaster.co.uk ? They're the biggest in the UK and have a decent reputation.
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 01:57 AM
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When is soccer/footabll season in London area?
gail is offline  
Old Nov 10th, 2004, 01:59 AM
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Gail - The English season runs September-May.

Steve
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 02:20 AM
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There are large numbers of professional football clubs in the London area and ease or difficulty of getting tickets varies. Forget Arsenal - their current home has tiny capacity and can sell three times the seats available, so season tickets and members get all the tickets. Sometimes you can get in at Chelsea, esp against lesser oppositions, and usually at Spurs, Fulham, Crystal Palace and Charlton. They all have websites with online booking. Below Premiership getting tickets is normally no problem and you can just pay on the day. They include West Ham, QPR, Millwall, Brentford and Leyton Orient. You can often get them from agents like Ticketmaster, but you pay a fee on top.
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 03:19 AM
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You could always get them from a ticket scalper just before the game. I agree with Alec, Arsenal will be nearly impossible or very expensive. The others will be available at the ticket office on the day of the game or from a scalper.

www.lastminute.com does offer "Hospitality" packages which usually include lunch before or after the match, maybe meeting one of the players, a stadium tour and a ticket to the match, but it tends to be expensive. The packages vary.

Good luck!
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 04:43 AM
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Tip: Don't call it 'soccer'!!

It's called football over here and, right or wrong, we really don't like it being called soccer. Therefore you'll earn huge brownie points if you use the right name!

When are you going to be here? It depends which games are being played as to whether you'll get tickets for the bigger clubs (ideally you want to go to either Arsenal or Chelsea, maybe Spurs). You'll find that for some European or Cup games the tickets don't sell out. Once you know your dates your best bet is certainly ticketmaster.co.uk - failing that it's always worth contacting the clubs directly (you could always claim something like your grandfather was a lifelong xxxxx supporter and it's always been your dream to see xxxxx play since you were a small child blah blah....)

Good luck!

(PS. I strongly urge you to try to get to Highbury (Arsenal) - but that's possibly because I'm 100% biased!)
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 04:58 AM
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Try www.westminsterevents.com
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 06:19 AM
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Origination of the term "Soccer"

The game we in the USA know as soccer is mentioned as long as two thousand years in the Chinese writings of the Han Dynasty. Through the years it also shows up in Japanese, Greek and Roman history under different names.
In the late 1800s it was the practice of the well-to-do students at Oxford University in England to shorten the length of some common words. At the same time they would add -er to the end of the word. For example, breakfast became known as "brekkers". There were two forms of "football" being played on campus at the time. One used the Rugby Rules and the other form used the rules governed by the Football Association of London.

The prior was called "ruggers" on campus and the latter as "soccer" which was short for association and included the popular "-er" ending used by the "in" students.

The phrasing caught on and became the popular nickname for the sport. In the United States it is used to differentiate soccer from what the rest of the world refers to as American Football - the pointy variety.

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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 07:34 AM
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AAFrequentFlyer:

Thank you so much for your kind precis of the history of one aspect of the English language. However, I think that you should perhaps note that I stated the following:

"..It's called football over here and, right or wrong, we really don't like it being called soccer.."

Perhaps I should more correctly have pointed out that it is considered a matter of etiquette to refer to 'soccer' as 'football'.

Is that a high horse that you're sitting on? Might I kindly suggest that you get off it...?
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 07:43 AM
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Whoa, badday?

I just wanted to put the info out for anybody that is interested in the origination of the word, it wasn't pointed at you. Don't be so vain!

Try to chill out and the day may get better!
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 07:55 AM
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AAFrequentFlyer: Hmm...well only an hour until I can get out of the office and into the pub where I hope there'll be a great big gin & tonic waiting for me!

Sorry. But you should have made that clear!
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 07:56 AM
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I thought AAF's post was interesting. Nothing high horse about it so there was no requirement to warn people that he was merely being informative & not snotty.

Go pee on someone else's post, T. Enjoy that G&T.
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 08:06 AM
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rockhopper7: I have just apologised for taking the post out of context. I apologise once more if that wasn't good enough!
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Old Nov 10th, 2004, 08:48 AM
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T, It seems pretty clear from the time stamp that you and I were posting at the same time.

You are one of the loudest & most prolific posters lobbying to make this forum less sugary and more acerbic. Don't dish it if you can't take it.
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Old Nov 12th, 2004, 01:26 AM
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rockhopper7: Ever heard of sarcasm? It's something we English folk use a lot!!
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Old Nov 12th, 2004, 04:08 AM
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Tallulah, I'm probably one of the most sarcastic Brits you can find, but it doesn't work very well in written English

What i will say is that it's our language so we're right(sarcastic).

Would this be a good time to point out that players of our full contact sport (rugby) don't need lots of sissy padding........
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Old Nov 12th, 2004, 05:01 AM
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...or is it a good time to point out that sissy posh Victorian Oxford Uni students are really not your typical football player or fan, so certainly shouldn't be paid any attention to in reference to what the game's called!

"Rugger" and "soccer", for Chrissakes! Surely it's a myth that anyone ever actually talked like that!
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Old Nov 12th, 2004, 05:34 AM
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http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=soccer&x=15&y=16

Main Entry: soc?cer
Pronunciation: 'sä-k&r
Function: noun
Etymology: by shortening & alteration from association football
: a game played on a field between two teams of 11 players each with the object to propel a round ball into the opponent's goal by kicking or by hitting it with any part of the body except the hands and arms -- called also association football
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Old Nov 12th, 2004, 06:31 AM
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And just to add flame to the fire: football is called both soccer and football in Ireland, north and south because gaelic football is often just called football, so we need some way to differentiate.

AA--sorry I didn't e-mail you. You had said you'd be in Belfast in November. I'm actually in the US at the moment, and will be until the New Year. Hope you enjoyed/will enjoy our fair city.
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