Three weeks in Paris, Nov.-Dec.

Old Jul 5th, 1999, 10:26 AM
  #1  
Jerry
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Three weeks in Paris, Nov.-Dec.

The best use of this time frame. Day trips,
overnight trips including other countries.
 
Old Jul 5th, 1999, 11:07 AM
  #2  
Bill
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Spent just about three weeks in Paris
inSept 1998. Great city to walk in and
the metro works wonderfully well also.
Did three day trips while in Paris,
Versailles, Chantilly and Vernon(the
train station for Giverny-Monets home).
Probably could have done a fourth to
Fontainebleu but we did this later in
driving around france. Enjoy the city
the three weeks will be gone as soon
as you know it.
Have a wonderful trip.
 
Old Jul 5th, 1999, 06:04 PM
  #3  
Monica
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To add, I went to Dijon, Reims, Fontainebleau, May 1999. Back in 1997, I went to Chartres, Versailles, and Monets home and gardens, which was lovely! There is plenty to see and do in Paris! Other day trip options: Rouen, which I missed the chance to do so. I also went to the Loire Valley for 3 days, stayed in Tours and visited several chateaux.
 
Old Jul 5th, 1999, 08:27 PM
  #4  
Brian
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Somewhere else in France other than Paris. Too many people spend way too much time and money in Paris, when the rest of France is a hundred times better in terms of things to see, friendlier people, and a real sense of French life. It is like someone coming to the US and spending three weeks in New York. So I would say spend at the most a week in Paris if your heart is really set, but spend the remaining 2 weeks exploring the rest of France(Normandy, Brittany, Provence, French Riveria, the Atlantic Coast to name a few other areas)
 
Old Jul 5th, 1999, 11:54 PM
  #5  
Vincent
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You'll be lucky to travel off-season, so don't bother with too many reservations, and let flexibility be your main word. Spend at least one week in Paris, after you'll decide, either that you are tired of those awful Parisians, or that you haven't had enough of culture, café society, romance, etc. Anyway, it's true that you have enough time to wander around. At that time of the year, I would recommend you dedicate your "provincial time" to Provence. Avignon is only 3 hours from Paris by TGV, and you'll go from a drab,winter-like climate in Paris, to something much more luminous and almost spring-like in Provence. I'd recommend you take the TGV to Avignon, then rent a car and tour the area for 10 to 15 days, going as far as Nice (everything is easily and quickly accessible by autoroute).
 
Old Jul 8th, 1999, 04:30 AM
  #6  
topper
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!
 
Old Jul 19th, 1999, 12:27 PM
  #7  
Kelly
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I agree with Brian, Paris definitely has its limits, and is exhausting. After about 3 days we were tired, and there really is not place to unwind. (The rain lasting a week didn't help). Definitely do the Loire, much less expensive and very interesting. Reims is good for a day, but no more. Do a few champagne caves and the cathedral. Strasbourg is everything good about Paris, but without most of the bad. I would move there in a heartbeat.
 
Old Jul 19th, 1999, 12:51 PM
  #8  
dan woodlief
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I would spend a week in Paris, maybe even a week and a half. If you have to stay in Paris the whole three weeks, I would break this time up as much as possible. As others have said, Paris is very exhausting. It almost killed me -- well, at least my feet. Top daytrips for me would include Chartres, Versailles (maybe even more exhausting than Paris, so go earlier in your trip), Fontainebleu, Chantilly, Rouen, and Reims. I have actually only been to Chartres and Versailles, but I know a bit about the others as places I plan to go on other trips. I am not sure how attractive Monet's place at Giverny would be in Nov-Dec - maybe someone else can answer that one.

If you don't have to spend all your nights in Paris, I would give it a week at the beginning and use the other two weeks to recover in different locations, or do it last as a big end to the trip.
 
Old Jul 19th, 1999, 12:54 PM
  #9  
dan woodlief
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I would spend a week in Paris, maybe even a week and a half. If you have to stay in Paris the whole three weeks, I would break this time up as much as possible. As others have said, Paris is very exhausting. It almost killed me -- well, at least my feet. Top daytrips for me would include Chartres, Versailles (maybe even more exhausting than Paris, so go earlier in your trip), Fontainebleu, Chantilly, Rouen, and Reims. I have actually only been to Chartres and Versailles, but I know a bit about the others as places I plan to go on other trips. I am not sure how attractive Monet's place at Giverny would be in Nov-Dec - maybe someone else can answer that one.

If you don't have to spend all your nights in Paris (and it appears you don't), I would give it a week at the beginning and use the other two weeks to recover in different locations, or do it last as a big end to the trip. Maybe the Loire Valley, Strasbourg, Mont St-Michel (I would imagine nice and uncrowded that time of year - they are doing some construction work there now), Brugge (Belgium), Netherlands, Western Germany.
 
Old Jul 19th, 1999, 02:00 PM
  #10  
elaine
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At the time of year you're going, the weather may be cold and rainy in the north (of course, that's possible at almost any time). I agree with Vincent that Provence is beautiful. There are historic sights, beautiful countryside, nice hotels, pleasant people. As there are in Paris, as far as I'm concerned. A week or two in Paris could be just wonderful. After the first days of tiring sightseeing, break it up with some day trips to Chartres and Reims and Fontainebleau and Versailles. I've not been to Giverny in winter, don't know what the Monet site would be like at that time. But how wonderful to have the luxury of time in Paris. Of course there are places to unwind! Unwind in a cafe for an afternoon after a leisurely lunch, or revisit a favorite museum and spend time only in the section you like, or go to concerts in Ste Chapelle, or to the theatre. Stop for pastry in the afternoon. Get to know the neighborhoods, not just the famous places. Taking the time to really know Paris, not just doing the whirlwind tour, is a rare luxury. I agree with a previous poster that large
cities like Paris or New York are certainly not the only places worth seeing in a country, but I disagree strongly that the people who live in the cities are less friendly, or that there is less to see in the cities,(?), or that Paris won't give you a sense of "real French life". It is certainly real for the large population who lives there. Cities like Paris
have more of everything: more restaurants, more hotels, more museums, more beautiful buildings, more romantic places, more historic sites, more theatre, more concerts,more choices, and yes, more traffic and inconveniences. See other areas by all means, but don't shortchange Paris, you have an enviable opportunity to become well acquainted.
If you're interested in trips to other places like London, Bruges, Amsterdam, you might want to do a Search on this forum, there have been lots of suggestions.


 
Old Jul 21st, 1999, 02:43 PM
  #11  
Steve
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Jerry - Paris is incredible but you may tire of all the people, traffic, noise, etc. after a while. The French countryside is so relaxing after several days in Paris. My family and I took a short trian ride to Epernay to vist the champagne makers in Nov-97. Very nice little town, with champagne as its chief industry.
For overnight trips, consider other parts of France. You'll see sights as beautiful as most countries can offer, and you won't have to switch languages. You'll be able to use the phrases you learned in Paris, and the smaller cities are MUCH cheaper than Paris for everything.
We've been to Lyon, Provence, Toulouse, and the Pyrenees. We liked the latter beccause of the lack of crowds and the beautiful mountains. Lourdes is also in the foothills of the Pyreness; a strange but beautiful place. I was surpirsed that I enjoyed it. Albi is in a nice area near Toulouse. I think there are TGV trains to Toulouse. I know we've taken one to Lyon (1.5 hours?). Have a great trip.
 

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