Supermarkets

Feb 26th, 2008, 12:37 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 447
While huge supermarkets like those in US suburbs are rare, we found small supermarkets were actually reasonable abundant in Rome. (We were 4 adults and a 2-year old and staying in an apartment, so supermarkets were a must.) We regularly used the SMA(?) on via del Monte della Farina mentioned above as it was around the corner from our apartment, but there was also a Depsar within a few minutes walk. DiPerDi is another common chain. In Venice, they were a bit harder to find, but one not mentioned above is SuVe on Salizzada San Lio (close to San Marco, down the street from La Boutique del Gelato). If you let us know where exactly you're staying, I'm sure someone can point out the closest ones. Also, if you're renting an apartment, they'll be able to provide this info.

Enjoy your trip,
Paul
sanschag is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 02:59 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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Look for locals wheeling small empty shopping carts or baskets... follow them!

(Seriously that's how I found the one in Venice.)
suze is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 07:53 PM
  #23  
 
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There was a smallish grocery store just to the south side of Campo San Margherita, Dorsoduro, Venice. You walk by it if you're coming from Campo San Barnaba.

In Rome we walked toward the Colosseum from San Clemente. There are several rows of short streets that run up to eastern side of Colosseum. There is a small grocery store within a block or so of the Colosseum.

Also in Rome, there is a grocer in one of the streets between via del Corso, via del Tritone, and the bus terminal (Sisterno? Silvestre?)

There is a grocer in the tunnel between Spanish Steps and Borghese, Veneto exit I think.
Travelnut is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 05:18 AM
  #24  
 
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These cities normally have smaller stores than the mega-marts you may be used to.
sandi_travelnut is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 06:43 AM
  #25  
 
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@sanschag
"While huge supermarkets like those in US suburbs are rare"

This is not completely true, there are more then enough large super- and hypermarkets in Rome, but as in the US; they are in the suburbs too in Italy!

In and around Rome are at least 5 huge Carrefour-hypermarkets and 4 Auchan-hypermarkets. And there are probably other huge supermarkets too.

In city-centers, where there is little space, they usually have only small supermarkets.
TommieG is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 07:58 AM
  #26  
 
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@sanschag
"While huge supermarkets like those in US suburbs are rare"

"This is not completely true, there are more then enough large super- and hypermarkets in Rome, but as in the US; they are in the suburbs too in Italy!"

I was speaking more about the central city, but I take your point. However, the "suburb" markets in Marburg Germany (where I lived for 2+ years) were somewhat smaller than our supermarkets here in suburban NJ and were comparable to what we mostly saw while in Germany aside from the Wal-Mart in Geissen. In fact, I would say it was close to the size of the larger markets in "downtown" Brooklyn while we lived there.

Paul

sanschag is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 08:02 AM
  #27  
 
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Wait until you get there and ask the locals or at your hotel. That's what we always do.
Lily is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 10:48 AM
  #28  
 
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Perhaps the reason some countries like Germany may not have huge hypermarches everywhere i believe may lie in the facts that:

There is no Sunday shopping when folks most likely to mob hypermarches like on Sundays in U.S.

and shopping hours are short in evenings as well.

England overflows with new super centers everywhere on fringes on towns and perhaps that's because they liberalized their Sunday opening laws.
PalenQ is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 10:56 AM
  #29  
 
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England has large supermarkets before relaxed Sunday trading, I remember spending many a Tuesday evening trailing round Fine Fare as a child.

The new 'overflow' might have something to do with relaxed planning laws thought.
Pete_R is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 03:28 PM
  #30  
 
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One thing no one has mentioned is Mercado Centrale in Florence, not far from the outdoor clothing market in Piazza San Lorenzo.

This is not an American supermarket but rather a whole bunch of small shops all in one building. As I recall, meats, delis, cheeses, etc. are on the ground floor and the produce is on the second (or, in Europe, the first, meaning the first floor above the ground). It is fantastico! and truly a Super market, as far as I am concerned. So if you are staying in the central district in Florence, that's where you should go.
charnees is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 04:27 PM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
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Yes to all of the above.

There are large, suburban style super/hypermarkets (what's the difference between super and hyper BTW?) in or near all three of those cities. Once you get closer into the centri storichi (plural of centro storico), though, rents go up and available space goes down, so the best you'll typically do is find a mini-version of the same brand. Although not a complete list, some Italian super/hypermarket brands are:
* Conad
* Standa
* Maxi Tigre
* COOP (I think)

(If any of you can think of the names of the supermarkets in Poggibonsi, Chiusi in the Chiusi Mall off the Autostrada, and Castiglione del Lago on the Chiusi highway, chime in.)

Although the prices may not be as low in a local's shop -- a salumeria, alimentaria, frutta e verdura, etc. -- you will find them much more common. It's how things have been done for a zillion years -- go to the butcher, then the milk store, then the greengrocer, etc. The local salumeria will generally have most everything you will need. The super/hupermarket will just have a greater selection.

On a side note: Lisbon has at least two megamarkets right in downtown Lisbon: El Corte Ingles (IIRC the largest one in the Spanish chain) as well as one whose name I forget in the Amoreiras Shopping Center. So it is possible to cram a major suburban-scale store into a dense urban area....
tdyls is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 07:11 PM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
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We were recently in Rome and after being there a week, noticed a large grocery store not far from our hotel on a side (non touristy) street. Of course, it will be easy to find little markets with cheese, bread and wine, so really all you need to pack is a cork screw and a camera. Have fun, Aussies, we loved your area as well.
suzanhh is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 11:44 PM
  #33  
 
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@sanschag:
"However, the "suburb" markets in Marburg Germany (where I lived for 2+ years) were somewhat smaller than our supermarkets here in suburban NJ"

That's true. In the Netherlands it is the same. Our 'large' supermarkets are smaller then the 'average' US-supermarket.
In the Netherlands it is not allowed to open (large) supermarkets/hypermarkets on the outskirts of the city. Most supermarkets are incorparated in regular shopping centers in the neighbourhoods.

@tdyls
"(what's the difference between super and hyper BTW?)"

Generally speaking are hypermarkets biggger than supermarkets. Plus the fact that in supermarkets the focus is on food, in hypermarkets you can also buy a lot of non-food (tv's, books, bicycles etc). And at last; hypermarkets mostly have a shopping arcade incorporated with other shops (some kind of a small mall).
Just visit one when you are in France, Italy or Spain (there you can find the most hypermarkets in Europe).
TommieG is offline  
Feb 27th, 2008, 11:48 PM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
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@tdyls
"(If any of you can think of the names of the supermarkets in Poggibonsi, Chiusi in the Chiusi Mall off the Autostrada, and Castiglione del Lago on the Chiusi highway, chime in)"

Supermercatie PAM if I am not mistaken.
TommieG is offline  

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