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Something special that never made the guide books

Something special that never made the guide books

Old Aug 7th, 2005, 07:43 AM
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Something special that never made the guide books

Hello All;

I will be leaving in 4 days - YEEEEEHAAAAAA - with the family for a far too short (10 days) vacation in Germany. And with a new Canon 20D, too - gasp.

I have done lots of research and been to Europe quite a few times so I have 3 times as many things I want to see as I will have time for. The simple fact is; the more I go and the more I know, the more I want to see.

A travel addiction can really suck

Since I have to cull some locations, and sights, and it is an excrucaitngly painful process, I will ask for some of your advise.

Among these towns/sites, is there something that made you swoon, and caused you to label a place as a "must-see". I'm asking about something that may only seem special to you - I have certainly tried to explain my attraction to certain places to others and received only polite stares and nods but those are some of my best memories.

An example; the cemetery at Stiftskirche St. Peter in Salzburg. I have spent hours and hours just strolling through this place. My wife came the first time, stayed impatiently for 10 minutes then kept asking me to leave. The second time, she arranged to mee me after a couple of hours - I was late - and the last time she simply said to come back to the hotel when I was done.

I have a feeling that I might understand someone elses little loves and be able to find more of those special places.

Here are the areas already mapped out that fit our schedule; (please consider anything within about na hour of these locations)

Rothenburg - I know, I know, I've been there before but I only go out at night and the kids have to see the Night Watchman

Miltenberg
Michelstadt
Bad Wimpfen
Schwabisch Hall
Lichtenstein - the castle not the country
Haigerloch
Calw
Gengenbach
Route de vin - St. Hippolyte, Selestat, etc.

Thanks for any advise



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Old Aug 7th, 2005, 08:05 AM
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Here are a couple of suggestions:

At Haigerloch, you're very close to Schloss Hohenzollern, a spectacular castle, which to my mind rivals Burg Eltz on the Mosel.

From Gengenbach, follow the Kinzig Valley to Gutach where you will find the Schwartzwälder Freilichtmuseum (Black Forest Open Air Museum), a fine collection of historical buildings from throughout the Black Forest. If you have time, you can continue on to Triberg, and then return by any green marked route on a Michelin map for outstanding scenery. On the way to Gutach, take a detour just up the road between Biberach and Lahr, where there is a very picturesque ruined castle (Hohen Geroldseck) and across from it a great gasthof, which advertises itself as the oldest in Germany.

I don't know how much time you have for the Route du Vin in Alsace, but every town is a jewel. Even though Riquewihr is filled with tourists, it's not to be missed. You might also try to see the restored castle of Haut Koenigsbourg. If you haven't had it before, make sure to have some Flammekueche (Tarte Flambée). If you have, then you don't need my advice!

If you have time, drive up into the Vosges to visit Le Linge, a First War battlefield high in the mountains. You can walk the trenches and wonder how men endured it there. On an equally sombre note, in the Vosges you can also visit the Struthof concentration camp.

You're right that 10 days is too short, but I'm sure you'll enjoy every one.
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Old Aug 7th, 2005, 08:15 AM
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Aramis -

I loved St. Peter's Cemetery in Salzburg. Each grave was so lovingly tended to.

Although I have not been to Germany yet, I've been doing a lot of research. Have you walked to Detwang from Rothenburg yet?

We're planning on going to Bad Wimpfen for their pig museum (I collect them). Perhaps a stop might provide you with some whimsy.

I do hope you post a trip report when you return as I would love to know more about your travels, since you will be visiting many of the places I plan to go. Peace.

Robyn >-

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Old Aug 10th, 2005, 03:48 AM
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Thanks laverendrye - Hohen Geroldseck is completely new to me so I will give it a try. And I hadn't heard of the pleasures of the tart flambe, so I'll have to let it burn, baby!

Robyn;

I will post a travelogue when we return. I have read quite a few and there are some really good finds buried in some of them.

Well, it's off tomorrow night so if anyone else has any advice.........


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Old Aug 10th, 2005, 04:45 AM
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Please think of east Germany. Until 1944 the allied bombers could not do much there, so there are fine eighteenth century towns, ports at Stralsund and Greifswald, and cities of merchants in Bautzen and Goerlitz. Only west German tourists seem to go much, and low employment in these provinces brings the costs down. For really low costs, stay at the Hotel Pod Orlem in the Polish part of Goerlitz, cross to Goerlitz main station by bus every thirty minutes, in twenty minutes, and see Goerlitz and nearby Bautzen. If you are in those parts you should of course spend a day in Dresden. If it is open, the museum of Dresden history there is full of interest, with its cover of Nazi and Socialist days. I wish they would dare a similar museum in East Berlin

Ben Haines, London
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Old Aug 10th, 2005, 05:48 AM
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Gengenbach is just lovely. We have spent a delightful 4 days there. The Alsatian wine route (technically in France) is strewn with pretty little villages. Start at Strasbourg (a very picturesque city) and end at Colmar. That area is one of our favourites in all of Europe.
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Old Aug 12th, 2005, 07:44 AM
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I'm not sure what deepa means by saying that Alsace is "technically in France". It has been an integral part of France since the 17th century, except for the periods 1871-1918 and 1940-45 when it was annexed by Germany in two wars. Let me assure you that my Alsatian friends, who speak both French and Alsatian, consider themselves 100% French, not merely "technically" so. They would be gravely insulted to be considered as German. One might as well say that Geneva is "technically in Switzerland."

Alsace certainly does have strong influences from its German mediaeval past, and Alsatian is an Alemannisch dialect of German, but its French culture is strong and pervasive.

It's also interesting to remember that the Marseillaise was in fact composed and first sung in Strasbourg in 1792.
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Old Aug 18th, 2005, 06:59 PM
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Laverendyre, All I meant by saying that Alsace is 'technically in France' is that the OP was actually discussing a 'vacation in Germany' and I was suggesting an area, right next to Germany but which is actually in France. Therefore, what I meant by it is - 'this area is not actually in Germany (but close enough) but beautiful to visit'. Sorry for getting you all worked up.
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Old Aug 18th, 2005, 07:48 PM
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Laverendyre, I'm sorry but I have to reply again. Have just read the whole thread again.

It is your post that actually almost implies that Alsace is in Germany and I actually have gone on to agree that it is a great area but is not actually in Germany. The OP asks about a vacation in Germany, mentions about 9 places, all of which are in Germany. You go on to reply about Gengenbach and the black forest area in your first paragraph and then in the next para, go on to the Alsatian wine route, without mentioning once that you are now describing an area of France! And then you go on to asking what I meant by saying that Alsace is technically a part of France. You bet it is technically a part of France! You may be excellent in your knowledge of European history but you need to get some lessons on logical reasoning first.
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