So what exactly is "Pie and Chips"?

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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:36 AM
  #1
bd
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So what exactly is "Pie and Chips"?

There is a Geico commercial in the states that has a cockney-accented gecko talking about pie and chips. Is this a common dish in the UK?
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:40 AM
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Just a guess from a non-Brit, but I'd say steak & kidney pie and french fries (aka chips).
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:46 AM
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Chicken and mushroom pie and chips is a favourite of mine but as the Geico's accent has changed from BBC English to Cockney over the past year so his pie tastes may have changed.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:49 AM
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If he's Cockney, shouldn't it be pie & mash (& liquor?)
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:55 AM
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Most fish and chip shops serve a range of pies as well as fish - steak and kidney, meat and potato, cheese and onion, etc. In the north they also sell steak puddings - steamed "pies" with suet crust pastry - best served with mushy peas and gravy.

Staple "pub grub" also includes steak and kidney pie and chips - as well as a few more exotic offerings.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:55 AM
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Mutton, steak or steak and kidney, chicken, macaroni cheese and minced meat are just a few common pies. Personally I dislike all of them.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 06:58 AM
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I can't say I've ever seen mutton or macaroni cheese pies - must be a regional thing. "Up north" we like our Holland's pies:

http://www.hollandspies.co.uk/
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:13 AM
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Both Mutton and macarone cheese pies are common in Scotland.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:18 AM
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bd
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Would it be like our "pot pies" with crust on the top?
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:27 AM
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You can get pies with just a top crust - pub and restaurant pies are often served in a dish with a lid of pastry. Chip shop and bakery pies are usualy baked in a tin foil dish or plate with pastry top and bottom.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:30 AM
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bd, pies over here come in all shapes and sizes. You won't know which sort until they bring it to your table. They can be cooked in little casserole dishes with a puff pastry top, or can be entirely cased in short crust pastry (much preferable). Sometimes, a pub might make one enormous pie and give you a portion of it.

This site has pictures of various pies:
http://www.pbase.com/orac/great_british_food

NB the 'chips' are thick cut, not those pale imitations 'french fries' which to me are the thin sort you get in MacDonalds.

A traditional meal still found in some places in London is 'pie and mash' - a pastry cased meat pie served with mashed potato and 'liquer', which is a weird kind of runny parsley sauce. An acquired taste. You can get traditonal pie and mash in just a few old pie and mash shops around London, but they're a dieing breed. There's a stand in Borough Market that sells them.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:34 AM
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Is it still frowned on (or greeted with a blank look) to ask for mushy peas and gravy in a chip shop "down south"?
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:37 AM
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Of course not. That's the sort of daft anti-London propaganda spread about by Mancs and Scousers who've never ventured further south than Brum. My partner ALWAYS has mushy peas from our local chip shop (bluergh)
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:41 AM
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No Kate, I speak from experience - but I must admit not that recent, as I don't frequent fish and chip shops too often in these health conscious days.

(and I'm from Cheshire, not Manchester )
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:46 AM
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>Is it still frowned on (or greeted with a blank look) to ask for mushy peas and gravy in a chip shop "down south"?<

You have to bear in mind differences in regional dialect. Legend has it that in parts of London, you ask for "some of that delicious-looking guacamole". But you still get mushy peas.
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:49 AM
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I thought that the gecko in that commercial was from Oz.

I don't think they have geckos in London.

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Feb 22nd, 2006, 07:53 AM
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Maybe not, but we have an awful lot of aussies...
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Feb 22nd, 2006, 08:05 AM
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Kate,

Thanks for that link to the photos of British cooking. Wonderful stuff.

Although naturalized US citizens, my grandparents kept a house in the midlands and I spent a lot of time there as a child.

I always maintained that proper British cooking owed no apologies to any other nations cuisine.

When done right there is a sturdiness and honesty in it that reflects those same qualities in her people.

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Feb 23rd, 2006, 04:29 AM
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If the gecko is from OZ it will be talking about pie and peas. Which is a meat pie in a lake of watered down mushie peas - ummmmmmmmmmmm.
Im from Leeds living in London and trying to get chips and gravy is a nightmare and as for there being no haddock.......
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Feb 23rd, 2006, 04:33 AM
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Jim, my partner is from Lancashire and has influenced me to such an extent that I too now put gravy on my fish and chips. The answer is to take your fish and chips home and get the Bisto out. This must be a truly northern thing, because we certainly didn't put gravy on our chips in my home town of Birmingham.
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