Self-converting hairdryers

Old May 4th, 1999, 03:26 AM
  #1  
Marty
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Self-converting hairdryers

This is my fifth trip to Europe in 5 years, and I still am not satisfied with my hair dryer problem. I know hotel hairdryers are worthless for my hair. It is relatively long, thick and frizzy! I have to dry it to be presentable. I have tried adapters and converters, but they slow my hair dryer down so much that I may as well try to use the one in the hotel room (well, not quite that bad). Who has experience with the hair dryers that supposedly convert with just an adapter. Do they work? Do I have to switch them over myself? They are very confusing to me. I will be in Paris and Rome this year, and I am already worried.
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 04:36 AM
  #2  
elaine
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I have had the same problem--the transformers/converters made my 1600W
hairdryer weak in Europe. Since you go fairly often, why not buy one over there and keep it for travel?
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 05:14 AM
  #3  
Lee
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Marty: I believe that Elaine has your answer. Buy an inexpensive one over there.

Here's what happens: The voltage in the US is 110-120 volts AC and in Europe, it's 220 volts AC. Current and voltage are directly proportional and so they (essentially) double. The frequency of the voltage is 60 Hz (cycles per second) in the US, but 50 Hz in Europe, thus the slower motor (dryer) speed. The Europeans probably compensate with a higher speed (RPM) motor in their hair dryers.

Theirs is your best bet.
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 10:47 AM
  #4  
Sigrid
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I recently bought a "world traveler" hairdryer with a switch to change from 125 to 250 volts. If the voltage in Europe is 220, will my hairdryer work?
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 11:49 AM
  #5  
Lee
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Sigrid: "220, 221, whatever it takes" was the line in film "Mr. Mom", I think.

Yes, the hair dryer will be fine. The line voltage is never constant, rather it fluctuates around 10% (sometimes more) on a regular basis and is considered normal.
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 01:15 PM
  #6  
Wendy
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Buy a small hairdryer at Target or Walmart - the newer ones usually convert. There's a switch on the handle that you can flip. Then just buy plug adapters when you get there. I like to travel in the US too, so a domestic one is a good answer for me.
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 02:17 PM
  #7  
elaine
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I have used dual voltage appliances in addition to going the converter route, and they work but they are weak. Once I had a curling iron with the proper converter, and it melted into my hair!
I would still go the "buy one over there" route.
 
Old May 4th, 1999, 02:17 PM
  #8  
elaine
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I have used dual voltage appliances in addition to going the converter route, and they work but they are weak. Once I had a curling iron with the proper converter, and it melted into my hair!
I would still go the "buy one over there" route.
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 12:20 PM
  #9  
Theresa
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has anyone tried the butane powered curling irons?
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 03:07 PM
  #10  
Marty
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If I buy a hairdryer in Paris, will it work everywhere in Europe,except Great Britain,especially Rome where I am heading next?
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 05:06 PM
  #11  
Mary
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Yes, I do own one of those butane curling irons and it is fantastic. However, I would really like some clarification. When you look at your airplane tickets and the liabilities,etc.,they are included as being "illegal". Any thoughts??
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 05:09 PM
  #12  
Cheryl Z.
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Marty - I have long thick hair and have the same problem, but am satisfied with the hotel dryers in practically every country we've been in. I don't really care if my hair is not perfect when I travel - I'm just happy to be there! I do carry a dual voltage Conair l600 tho "just in case". It converts by itself and I just need an adapter. I personally wouldn't waste the time/money to purchase one in the country I was visiting given the wide range of countries we travel to - besides Europe, Australia,New Zealand, Japan, etc. However, if you frequently were to go to the same countries that had same voltage, then it might make sense.
 
Old May 12th, 1999, 05:34 PM
  #13  
April
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Boy, can I relate to this question. The hardest part of going to Africa was having to be without my hairdryer! Say, Marty, is your hair also curly in an unruly fashion? If so, have you tried the wonderful hair straighters, like Re Balance's Strait-line or KMS's Flat Out? (I think Joico has one too.) You just put it on after washing, and comb your hair straight as you blow-dry. You can end up with wonderfully sleek, straight hair.
 
Old May 13th, 1999, 04:21 PM
  #14  
Marty
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April, yes, yes, yes, and frizzy, if I am not very careful! I don't care if it is perfectly styled, but we are traveling with my husband's family, and I don't want to look disgusting! I have used straightening, comb in products, but they make my hair even harder to dry which magnifies the problem of the slow, cool dryer. I am used to 1850 watts of heat to get control of the situation! I have not heard of either product you mention; any idea where I might find them in NC?
 
Old May 13th, 1999, 04:34 PM
  #15  
Marty
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April, I did a search and found a close by place with KMS. Thanks; I am leaving in a few weeks, so I am going to try it with a cool dryer and see what happens.
 
Old May 13th, 1999, 10:03 PM
  #16  
April
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I've not tried these products with a cool dryer (I'd be drying my hair for half the day if I did), but they should still work as long as you pull your hair straight as you go.
I should mention that you may like one more than the other. The Flat-out puts a silicone type coating on the hair (that's the way my hairdresser described it anyway) and doesn't feel as much like a 'product' in your hair. For that reason, I have to use less of the Re Balance Strait-line which, oddly, I actually prefer. I find the Flat-out seems to make my light hair look darker with continued use.
If you wake up with a horrendous kink in your hair, just wet the offending spot, comb in one of those straighteners and blowdry it to glorious straightness. If your hair's like mine, any humidity at all makes it go berserk. I find these products help with that too. Good luck.
 
Old May 14th, 1999, 07:06 AM
  #17  
Theresa
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On the question of butane curling irons: according to the papers that came with mine (Conair) you can carry one butane cartridge in checked baggage on international flights. Maybe I'll chance it, and bring my electric just in case.
 

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