Scones?

Old May 3rd, 2007, 04:53 PM
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Scones?

So, how do you pronounce scones? One way in Ireland and another in Scotland.
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Old May 3rd, 2007, 05:11 PM
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Is this a trick question?

I would think the same. I lived in Scotland and they were pronounced just like we do.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 12:40 AM
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Well I am from Middlesex in the south of England and pronounce it scones, long o, my OH is from Lancashire in the north of England and pronounces it scons, short o. Either is acceptable.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 12:53 AM
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Ha, good question. There are two ways and speakers always think theirs is the 'right' way and the other is wrong. People can have arguments over this, believe it or not (tongue in cheek though).

It either rhymes with stones or on.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 04:29 AM
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The Ston of Scon or the Stone of Scone?



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Old May 4th, 2007, 04:35 AM
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or the stoon of skoon (Stone of skoon is closer)

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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:16 AM
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In Ireland we pronounce it with a long o (oh) .
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:35 AM
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This part-Scottish Londoner was taught to say Scon, with a definite feeling that Sc-oh-n was a bit, well, not quite us, darling.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:52 AM
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And while we are on the subject of afternoon refreshment we should talk about whether the milk goes in the cup first or the tea goes in first.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 06:41 AM
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and what about the argument of which goes on the sc-oh-ne first ---the jam or clotted cream?
(english mother taught that pronounciation and jam then cream)
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Old May 4th, 2007, 07:29 AM
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What is the logic behind jam then cream?

And tea first, right?
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Old May 4th, 2007, 07:30 AM
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Tests have so far proved insufficiently conclusive, nona. Further research is required.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 09:00 AM
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Well, tea before the milk for me. And jam before the cream (if the cream's any good, trying to spread the jam on it makes an unholy mess and leaves far too much of both stuck to the knife, and you daren't lick it: much easier the other way round for me).
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Old May 4th, 2007, 01:01 PM
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And do you pronounce margarine as in Margaret or as in marginal?

Or regard it as filthy muck you ought to wash your mouth out after using or even referring to?
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Old May 4th, 2007, 01:03 PM
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>>"Or regard it as filthy muck you ought to wash your mouth out after using or even referring to?"<<

Got it right the last time.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 01:05 PM
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hi sue,

I'm from the midlands and for me it was always "scone" as in "throne", "bone" etc.

Here in cornwall it tends to be Scon, as in .. well, not much to be honest.

Jam goes on first, then clotted cream. or vv, but here anyway it ought to be a cornish split, [a yeast bun] not a scone at all. spread it with cream then golden syrup, then it's thunder and lightening!

regards, ann

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Old May 4th, 2007, 01:05 PM
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The reason I asked is that we just returned from Ireland where they pronounced it with a long o, and my friend in Grand Cayman (born and raised in Scotland)has it rhyming with John.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:06 PM
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Irish grandmother - and she called them "tea biscuits" - and she put on them only butter and strawberry preserve. I had read about scones in old-fashioned British mysteries but never know what they actually were until I got there.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:35 PM
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To rhyme with 'stone'.

Cream first then jam.

Hot water, then milk last in tea. (That probably means I'm common!).

Oh, and no margerine in or on anything - nasty trans-fatty acids!
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Old May 4th, 2007, 06:09 PM
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I'll be contradictory voice on the milk/tea issue:

We were taught that the tea steeped in the tea pot; milk and sugar are put in the cup, and then tea is poured into the milk.

I don't know why it's this way, but it sure tastes good!
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