Reading matter regarding Paris Strikes

Nov 8th, 2007, 11:49 AM
  #1  
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Reading matter regarding Paris Strikes

This may help give an understanding to the strikes. Articles from the International Herald Tribune and the London Times:

France braces for transportation paralysis
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/10/...ope/france.php

Anyone using the EuroStar between London and Paris
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle2800913.ece


In November strikes, a direct test of the Sarkozy mettle
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/11/.../politicus.php


University students angry over reforms disrupt classes
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/...nt-Protest.php
TPaxe is offline  
Nov 8th, 2007, 12:02 PM
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Thanks TPaxe,
Gives us some insight to the reasons for strikes. With these people taking to the streets-do you think there is any danger? Where do the protest marches usually take place?( so we could avoid)
Thanks
JeaninGeorgia is offline  
Nov 8th, 2007, 12:47 PM
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The protest marches I've seen have been well organized and orderly. In fact I thought it was rather interesting to watch some on the Boul. St Germain. There is plenty of police presence and life goes on as usual one the sidewalks.
avalon is offline  
Nov 9th, 2007, 09:42 AM
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Protests and strikes have to be organized in advance in France. It's required by the law, so there won't be any surprises, but usually they are around the Bastille, Republique.

Most of the public are behind Sarkozy because these public servants with special privleges is taking it's toll on the budget. They do get paid while striking, they do have their days added onto the pension and unfortunately the unions are very militant (with a couple of Union bosses truly scary!!) in France, and prefer to take the public as hostages.

I have a file in French listing benefits the public servants with special privledges get, but I'm afraid most people won't understand it. It's truly worrying and a big problem the French tax payer has to deal with.

Also, just keep an eye out on the television at all metro stations, as this lists which metros are running, which ones are not, etc.
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Nov 9th, 2007, 10:33 AM
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I read that the private sector and government workers or SNCF do not even pay into the same retirement fund. Are these funds going to be merged?
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Nov 9th, 2007, 10:47 AM
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I don't know if this answers your question, but here is some info relating to public and private sectors. There is a person on the board, Pvoyaguese who is in the French system and knows the ins and outs.

The retired age for the priviledged public worker is 50 which was introduced in 1910!

This time, Sarkozy has cleverly focussed on aspects of the "special regimes" that infuriate ordinary workers. By proposing to do away with legislation which allows train drivers to retire (in some cases) at fifty, Sarkozy has made trade unions look selfish as they defend the indefensible. The early retirement on nearly full salary was introduced when working on the trains was a tough and hazardous job: Few railway workers could expect to live a great deal longer after retirement at fifty or so. Today, a worker can expect to live to nearly eighty.
Many in France see this as indefensible. The trade unions' usual cry - that they are fighting for their privileges to be extended to private sector workers too - doesn't ring true. Workers realise that in a few short decades, every two retirees will be funded by three workers. When the current system was introduced, four or five workers supported each retired comrade, and life expectancy wasn't as high as it is today.
So, for once, the trade unions appear less like they see themselves - the vanguard protection of social welfare - and more like a bunch of selfish and greedy anachronisms. For now.
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Nov 9th, 2007, 11:39 AM
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I saw that retirement age is 60 since 1983.
analogue is offline  
Nov 9th, 2007, 11:44 AM
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For the private sector, not for the public servants with special privelidges. I'm not sure if you have had time to read some of the articles posted on this thread. It may help
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Nov 10th, 2007, 06:32 AM
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I have a file in French listing benefits the public servants with special privledges get, but I'm afraid most people won't understand it.

I hope your list in't the phony one with the "prime de charbon" (suppressed in the late 60s when steam locs were withdrawn, and which actually was a benefit for engineers who used less coal than planned while keeping the train on time) or the "prime d'absence de prime".
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Nov 10th, 2007, 08:03 AM
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The "prime de charbon" is still being paid to retired employees who retired before 2002. It is the new retirees after this date it was suppressed, but there are still a lot of retired employees who retired before 2002! still being paid this.
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Nov 10th, 2007, 10:34 AM
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>> The "prime de charbon" is still being paid to retired employees who retired before 2002. It is the new retirees after this date it was suppressed, but there are still a lot of retired employees who retired before 2002! still being paid this. <<

!!! Do you have a source to back up that statement ? I stand by what I wrote with a minor correction : the "prime de charbon" was suppressed in 1974, when the last steam locs were withdrawn. I doubt that the SNCF would lie on its corporate website.

I have seen several paysheets for railwaymen, recent and older ones, and there is, of course, no evidence of the "prime de charbon".
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Nov 11th, 2007, 08:11 AM
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Superhetrodyn, you're going around in circles.

I said retirees BEFORE 2002 are still receiving the "prime de charbon", not people now, so you won't see it on their payslips. For the people who received the priviledged benefits before 2002, are receiving it in their monthly pension payments before that date.

Also the public servants who don't get the special priviledges are receing a PRIME de PRIME! as well so they don't feel left out.

As much as we need to be aware of how the strikes affect us, it's interesting to know why they are happening. Travelling around the globe is interesting to know what is happening politically, culturally, gastronomically, etc, so having an idea of why the government are trying to bring in reforms, why there are strikes, helps understand the local culture.

Also, as the tables in cafes, bars, restaurants are so close to each other, there may be a likelihood where this conversation comes up. Nice to be a foreigner and know what's going on locally and contribute and learn about what is going on.

In the States, or New Zealand where strikes are rare, in France it's a common way of life, unfortunately.

As I have mentioned previously, I have a document in French of all the special benefits which are given to these public servants and their immediate families which is sucking the country dry. Hence the reforms.
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