Question for a local

Feb 28th, 2007, 05:58 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 10
Question for a local

Hello, I was wondering if Velveeta cheese (or something similar)is available in the grocery stores in London?
Atlertx is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:20 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,057
What's velveeta cheese? - then we'll be able to tell you.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:25 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,211
Velveeta more or less equals Dairylea.

They don't quite taste the same, and they're sold in different kinds of packaging in different ways. But there's a global Head of Disgusting Cheese-like Stuff somewhere in Kraft, or whatever silly name it's changed itself into this week who sits down each week and looks at the two brands as if they were the same thing.

Or did when I had some peripheral responsibility (I admit it, but it was a VERY long time ago) for the fortunes of Dairylea in the UK and Ireland.
flanneruk is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:36 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,057
La Vache Qui Rit is middle-class Dairylea.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:39 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 17,549
Flenner, don"t you wish you were making half as much as "Mr. Kraft" since both of you come up with disgusting things?
Dukey is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:57 AM
  #6  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 10
Thank you so much. We will be staying in a bed and breakfast and I wanted to introduce a Texas traditional food, known as Queso to our hostess. It requires Rotel tomatoes and green chilis with melted Velveeta (processed cheese spread). I will bring the Rotel, but didn't want to bring the Velveeta. I'll try the Dairylea. Thanks.
Atlertx is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 06:59 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 3,057
There's also primula - which comes in a sort of toothpaste tube. They have a variety with bits of prawn in. It's pink.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:21 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 92,781
I would think any "processed cheese food" could substitute.
suze is online now  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:28 AM
  #9  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
Hi At,
>I wanted to introduce a Texas traditional food, known as Queso to our hostess.<

Are you really sure that you want to do this?

With Velveeta?

Aren't US/UK relations strained enough at this time?

ira is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:34 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,060
For goodness sake, Velveeta cheese is utterly revolting.
It's a sort of cheese-flavoured rubber and is a lurid orange.
What has that poor landlady done to you?
Josser is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:37 AM
  #11  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
Remembering that Elmer's Glue is caseine-based (a milk derivative), I once used a slice of the white nonfat Velveeta to patch a hole in a wall.

ira is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:48 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,580
I actually looked up a recipe and it said that the dreaded Velveeta melts very easily.
You could actually use real cheese.
Go to Neils Yard in Covent Garden and ask for a good melting cheese.
Lancashire is a good one.
MissPrism is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:51 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,211
Look, I said Dairylea is more or less Velveeta . But I know just enough about Mexican and Texican food to be aware that:
- chili con queso needs you to melt the cheese, and
- Americans often use Velveeta: British "Mexican" restaurants ALWAYS seem to use real cheese (though the stuff they make in those restaurants is no advertisement for anything except the instant euthanasia of the chef)

I've absolutely no idea of the melting properties of Dairylea - but I've never heard of anyone (even, during my brief involvement, in the Kraft kitchen) melting the stuff. For all I know matter might turn into antimatter if you try. And "cheese food" is meaningless in Britain. Dairylea might do it, or it might not.

If you want to impress this landlady, I'd repost with a question like "making a chili con queso in the UK"

Someone's bound to have tried.
flanneruk is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 07:53 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,211
PS: And don't ruin Lancashire - the finest cheese in the world, and as Miss Prism says perfect for melting, - by blending chilis into it.

I'd say you want something rubberier.
flanneruk is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:07 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 9,736
"Are you really sure that you want to do this?"

I would have to ask that too. Why not just enjoy the wonderful British breakfasts while you're there? And, don't quite know how to ask this without sounding rude, but are you sure your hostess is going to want you in her kitchen? Especially while they're presumably trying to serve other guests?

If you absolutely insist that you must do this, unopened Velveeta doesn't require refrigeration. Most grocery stores sell in on the shelves next to the crackers. So I see no reason you couldn't pack it in your suitcase along with the Rotel.
CAPH52 is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:17 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 54
As a fellow Texan, I have to stick up for Atlertx. Velveeta on its own is admittedly gross, but warm queso served with tortilla chips is delicious.

I think if you don't want to bring Velveeta in your luggage, you could just look for a mild Cheddar that melts easily.
JulieG is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:20 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,580
Yes, has the landlady actually said that she would like you to cook for her?
As a previous poster said, she may not want somebody invading her kitchen.
Also, do you know if she likes chillies?
They are an acquired taste.
I can imagine the poor wifie smiling politely, and saying "how lovely" with tears rolling down her cheeks ;-)
MissPrism is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:40 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 33,757
I can't believe that Velveeta cheese is normal in any special recipe, or that any recipe would require processed Velveeta. If you are going to do this, why not buy decent Mexican cheese (like asadero or queso fresco). Queso is just Spanish for cheese, I also am surprised Texans would refer to an entire dish as "cheese" in Spanish if it is not only cheese, is that really the name? What if your hosts know Spanish and think that is reflective of Texans' knowledge of Spanish.
Christina is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 08:48 AM
  #19  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 10
Wow, I had no idea I would get such negative responses to my question. I was trying to introduce a favorite Texans dish. Thanks JulieG for the support. Please, unless you have never tried this dish it IS a favorite staple in Texas. Afterall, who ever loved or would even try escargot when they first heard about it? I was only trying to do something 'Texan' for my hostess.
Atlertx is offline  
Feb 28th, 2007, 09:01 AM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 659
Perhaps Atlertx was just trying to be nice and introduce something from his culture to his host. Suppose he doesn't like grilled tomato and baked beans for breakfast and has a "tear rolling down his cheek" saying how lovely".
tudorprincess is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:23 PM.