Pre-Raphaelite London

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Jul 6th, 2001, 07:06 PM
  #1
Linda
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Pre-Raphaelite London

Has anyone visited the Leighton House in London? Worth a visit? I believe it is near where we are staying, Five Sumner Place Hotel. We will be in London five days and I don't want to miss the BEST representations of the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Any suggestions?
Thanks for any help!
 
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Jul 6th, 2001, 10:42 PM
  #2
Ben Haines
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I think Leighton House centres upon Orientalism, certainnly a main line within the movement. But the best collection of their paintings overall is in the gallery in Birmingham, 100 minutes from Eustion station by train.

Please write if I can help further. Welcome to London

Ben Haines
 
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Jul 7th, 2001, 10:46 AM
  #3
Linda
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Thank you for your suggestion, though I won't be able to make it to Birmingham this trip!
 
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Jul 7th, 2001, 11:04 AM
  #4
JOdy
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Linda- It's been several years since we visited Leighton house, but I think it's worth the trip from South Ken. It's about 1/2 hour by tube. South London Art Gallery on Peckham Rd also has a collection of Pre-Raphaelite works. Haven't been there for years either but you might try a search on it .
You will enjoy 5 Sumner Place, we have stayed there a time or 2 when we couldn't get into our regular hotel which is right next door, Aster House!Great area!
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 05:28 AM
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elaine
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Having recently "discovered" the
Pre-Raphaelites myself
(blame it on a biography of John Ruskin that I read),
the South London art gallery has not been part of previous London trips of mine, but it seems it should for the next time.
I can't find it in any of my London guidebooks, could anyone provide a little more information (location etc)?
Also any other locations associated with the P-R Brotherhood would be appreciated; for example, I believe Rosetti's house is in Chelsea somewhere?
Is there a Ruskin house, or a Millais house in London? (I know there's a Ruskin house in the Lake District.)
Thanks
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 05:47 AM
  #6
ron
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Here is the web site for South London Gallery: http://www.southlondonart.com/

A quick glance at the site screams avant-garde at me - I don't see any pre-Raphaelite.
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 08:51 AM
  #7
ann
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Elaine,
Rossetti's house is at 16 Cheyne Walk in Chelsea - there's a bust of him across the street from it.
Speaking of John Ruskin, there's a wonderful book for anyone interested in the Pre-Raphaelites and travel that was recently reissued - "Effie in Venice," edited by Mary Lutyens. It consists of Effie Ruskin's letters home during the periods that she and John lived in Venice, and I just loved it.
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 08:56 AM
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elaine
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I had just bought the Effie in Venice book myself, looking forward to it.
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 09:10 AM
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JOdy
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Elaine- SLAG is located on Peckham Rd se5, 01 703 6120- From the cambridge guide to Museums..
The gallery origanally formed part of the south London Working Mens college, With the support of leasding art figures, notably Lord LEighton, a purpose built galery was opened in 1891. The most important collection is of works of the Victorian period, including works of Ford Madox Brown , G T Watts and Lord Leighton. In 1960 they began acquiring the best original prints of British artists working today. Temporary exhibitions are held each year covering a wide field of works.
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 09:38 AM
  #10
Thyra
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Some of my favorite Pre-Raphaelite works are in the Tate Gallery, London. I think they only have one room in the Gallery dedicated to Pre-Raphaelites, however, I really enjoyed the "Death of Ophelia" and "The Lady of Shallott" which had long been some of my favorite works. A visit to the Tate is worth it since it's one of my favorite museums in London.
 
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Jul 9th, 2001, 09:53 AM
  #11
JOdy
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I just had an email from Ben Haines, I'm so excited!! The correct phone number is 44 20 7703 6120.. You have to call ahead and they wil make a time for you to see the paintings, It has been at least 25 years since we were there and I had forgotten the details but Ben always comes through!!I even surprised him! Love you, Ben
 
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Jul 20th, 2001, 07:24 PM
  #12
JOdy
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Just found an interesting article on this subject
Lamp in masterpiece finds the light of day

BY LEWIS SMITH

A LANTERN that forms the centrepiece of one of Britain’s greatest religious paintings is to be sold after being found hanging covered in dirt in a stairwell. The lamp was commissioned by William Holman Hunt for his masterpiece The Light of the World, the most significant religious picture of the Victorian era.
When the painting went on show in the 1850s and was taken on a tour of Australia, Canada, the USA and South Africa many visitors collapsed unconscious, overcome by the impact, though some critics described it as Papist heresy. The Light of the World, portraying Jesus holding a lantern in the dark in front of a closed door, became so popular that hundreds of thousands of prints were sold around the world and it became a ubiquitous feature of Christian households.

The lamp that Hunt, one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, had made as a prop for the painting was constructed to his orders. Its design was full of religious symbolism, as was the rest of the painting. As a whole it represents the light and hope of Christianity. More specific features, such as its seven sides and seven arched apertures, represent the seven churches of Asia in the Book of Revelations. Other holes cut into the brass represent Pagans, Jews of the Old Testament and the Star of David.

The lantern has remained in private hands since it was made and has passed down to descendants of Hunt’s patron, Thomas Combe, remaining hidden from public view except for a week on exhibition in 1984. The current owner, who did not realise its full significance, contacted Bonhams and Brooks auction house to offer it for sale. The first reaction of Bonhams art expert Alistair Laird, was “pull the other one”, and was astonished when the offer proved to be genuine.

He travelled to the owner’s home where he found the lantern hanging in a stairwell. “It’s the highlight of my career,” he said yesterday. “To have the lantern which was the whole focus of the painting, rediscovered in a stairwell of a rather small modern terraced house is just amazing. I don’t think it had been cleaned since it was made 150 years ago.

“The bottom line is the painting became the iconic image of Christianity and was known by absolutely everybody. My parents had a print of it in our home — to handle the lamp itself is something I never dreamed I would do.”

Brendan Flynn, curator at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, which houses many of Hunt’s works, said the lamp was such an important object that museums were likely to queue up to try to acquire it. He said of The Light of the World, painted from 1851-3 and first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1854: “It’s difficult to exagerate its importance in terms of Victorian icons. It’s a touchstone of the Victorian period.”

The lamp, made by William Hacking, an ironmonger in Chelsea, west London, in 1852, will be auctioned in October and is expected to fetch £15,000. Hunt, a Christian, painted The Light of the World to represent Christ’s readiness to help anyone who would let him.

 
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