Places to visit in Denmark

Old Dec 17th, 2008, 12:36 PM
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For an off-beat but interesting excursion from Copenhagen

Take the train to Gillejle (sp?) a fishing village on the north tip of Jutland. Not sure where you have to change trains but at some point you ride an old interurban type train - the Gillelje Bahn (sp?) thru the countryside.

Grab some fresh broiled fish at Gillelje then hop another few-car interurban type train that plies the wild-looking northern coast over to Helsingor and then back to Copenhagen
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Old Dec 17th, 2008, 02:05 PM
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<i>We didn't find the food in Scandinavia to be any more expensive than what's in London, Paris, NYC, etc.</i>

Then I would say you didn't eat in the same class of restaurants. With the exception of the very top-tier, I would say restaurants in Copenhagen are at least 50% more than those in NYC - at the low-end, you are talking at least double. Compared to London, there are far fewer genuinely interesting and affordable places. Ditto for Paris.

I mean, when was the last time you paid $20 for take-out Pad Thai?

<i>Did anyone ever just pick up things at a grocery store and make their own meals?</i>

This is easily done, but bear the following in mind:

1) Prices will be as much as double what you pay in the US.
2) Most stores are small, so the selection may be limited.
3) At the cheapest places (Netto, Aldi, Fakta), the quality can be downright awful. I refuse to go to them.
4) Be aware of the limited opening hours. Most will close by 8pm during the week and as early as 5pm on Saturday. Only a handful of markets are open on Sunday. Look for Dogn Netto (better than regular Netto), which are usually open 8-10 every day.

<i>This is not to say that I'm not going to taste the cuisine (hell I'm a major foodie) but I'd rather spend more money on the sights and less on the food, at least this go around.</i>

Just as well. Danish food is good and hearty, but I don't think it anything to get excited over. Get some Smorrebrod. Try the hot dogs. Maybe get some Frikadeller. Eat some herring. This is a meat and potatoes country, and the better restaurants (aside from NOMA) could really be just about anywhere and are not particularly Scandinavian or Nordic.
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Old Dec 17th, 2008, 02:09 PM
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I should also mention that bakeries are open every day, and you can get bread and (sometimes) cheese there. Also, there are 7-11's everywhere that are open 24 hours.
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Old Dec 17th, 2008, 11:29 PM
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The D in Roskilde is almost silent.

Gilleleje is a pretty fishing village where they smoke fish by the harbourside. You can get freshly smoked herrings on rye bread and other things such as fiskefrikadeller with remoulade sauce and it is not expensive.

There are other picturesque villages in this area eg Hornbaek which has a good bakery there plus small supermarket. Supermarkets tend not to be great but at least you can stock up on basic supplies.

Some of the northern suburbs of Copenhagen are worth a trip eg Klampenborg.
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 06:56 AM
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Jelling. The Jelling Stone! And don't forget Legoland!!
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 07:08 AM
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Good one sandals, I'd forgotten about Jelling and the stone, even though I have a Royal Copenhagen plate with it on hanging in my dining room!

Some of the best hotdogs I have ever eaten were bought from roadside places in Denmark. Yummie.
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 07:23 AM
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Krodster....Food in Danmark is expensive...period. It doesn't matter whether or not it's eaten in a restaurant or bought in a supermarket. It was very expensive in the 70s/80s/90s/ and now in the 2000s. I've vacationed there/lived there over many decades. Happy Travels!
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 07:25 AM
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In Copenhagen the 2nd most visited tourist site, i read, was Christiana - the so-called Free City - a vestige of communes from the 60s, featuring many unique residences, pubs, restaurants, etc. as well as Pusher Street where cannabis is sold off table tops.

That said there may be no more Pusher Street nor Christiana as the government is trying to reclaim this former naval or military barracks compound back from the squattors - a valuable seaside location where fancy condos, etc. could arise.

But if still there check out Christiana, which is also situated in one of the most charming parts of Copenhagen.
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 08:31 AM
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Christiania is still alive and kicking. Personally, I find it pretty darn seedy and kind of repellant, but worth a look-see. Definitely worth the trip if you like to smoke herb. They have &quot;hidden&quot; their wares, so Pusher Street isn't the drug supermarket that it once was. Nonetheless, they haven't hidden anything too much - walk in and you will immediately know where to go.
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Old Dec 18th, 2008, 08:32 AM
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THE ROUND THE SOUND Excursion

I've done this twice and loved it each time.

Hop a train from Copenhagen to Malmo, Sweden, crossing the Sound on the fairly new tunnel-bridge - from the top of the bridge you get a view for many miles around

In Malmo head right away to Lund (Malmo is a dud IMO) - one of the nicest old-looking cities in a Scandinavia that is often all too modern to perk my interest much.

But Lund is great - a famous university and cathedral in a park-like setting.

Then take the train to Helsingborg, Sweden and hop the ferries that constantly shuttle you to Helsingor (elsinore) Denmark - visit Hamlet's Castle if time allows or at least see it as the boats glide past it.

Then take the coastal train route back to Copenhagen.
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