Pfalz wine region

Old Jun 20th, 2006, 12:25 PM
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Pfalz wine region

I am planning a trip to Germany this September. I am a wine lover (although not an afficianato). I have heard of the Pfalz and Rhine Terrace region, and was wondering if anyone could give me some insight on some of the towns in that region. I would love to go somewhere typically German, but then again not too touristy. Perhaps that is an oxymoron. What about the towns of Bad Durkheim or Deidesheim? Is Worms worth a day? Mainz? Anyway, I would love to see a few landmarks, but mostly I want to see nice countryside and sip (/gulp) delicious wine. Thank you for your help!
streethaunter is offline  
Old Jun 20th, 2006, 02:21 PM
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The trick to visiting the Pfalz area is to simply drive the Deutsche Wine Strasse and stop at all the little towns. Classic look and feel for vineyards.

The wine is pretty much the same quality everywhere unless you are really connected and can get into the owners cellars, which is always worth a try. The towns are very similar also in terms of charm, and ambiance.

Now, if you want a really good German wine experience head over to Bernkastel on the Mosel. I think they produce the best Riesling in Germany. Some of their Spatlese is unreal.

In addition, the area is one of the prettiest in Germany, and just a great place to sit around and get toasted on super wine. Have a nice trip.
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Old Jun 20th, 2006, 04:48 PM
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For something a little different you could spend a happy week poking around the region south and south-west of the towns of Bingen and Rüdesheim, following the Nahe river.

The Nahe is a delicate wine favoured by many Germans but undeservedly getting little recognition outside the country.

Harzer
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Old Jun 20th, 2006, 05:43 PM
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Streethaunter - I can't add too much, but DO follow the above advice. I've been to the Rhine and Mosel - a most beautiful area and the wines are a real treat.

Take a short cruise - they have whole day cruises or you can just hop from one town to another and visit Koblenz (it means confluence) for the confluence of the Mosel and Rhine rivers. Neat view. K-D lines is one company that runs these cruises. Inexpensive and lots of fun. You can see many, many vineyards along the rivers.

Along the Mosel, I enjoyed the towns of Cochem; Beilstein; Boppard to name a few.

Harzer - where is the Nahe River?? How come I didn't see it?
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Old Jun 21st, 2006, 02:26 AM
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If your trip is in mid to late September, you will be bang on time for the "Federweisser" season. If you see it offered at cafes and restaurants, you might want to try some as you can't get it outside Germany and beyond its extremely limited season (the wine only lasts about 10 days in bottles, even unopened and can't be shipped because it would leak everywhere). It's a light, fizzy, delicious new wine traditionally served with an onion tart...it should be found pretty easily in the Pfalz wine region.
I'll take Federweisser over beaujolais nouveau any day.
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Old Jun 21st, 2006, 02:29 AM
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Background on Federweisser (from a press release):

"In Germany, the season for wine festivals is in high gear and is now enhanced by a specialty only available at harvest time and in, or near, the wine-growing regions called “Federweisser,” or grape juice in the process of fermenting. The name refers to the milky-white color it takes on as the activated yeast converts the natural sugar in the juice into alcohol and carbon dioxide – some say it looks like “little floating white feathers.” Visitors to German wine country at this time of year can enjoy this unique specialty, traditionally served with “Zwiebelkuchen,” a delicious onion quiche.

“In the Pfalz and Rheinhessen, the harvest of very early-ripening varieites – such as Ortega, Huxel and Siegerrebe – has begun,” says Armin Göring, managing director of the German Wine Institute/Mainz, “and once the grapes are pressed, the juice is sold as Federweisser, a harbinger of the primary harvest in autumn. It won’t be long before this seasonal specialty is available in other wine-growing regions.”
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Old Jun 21st, 2006, 02:46 AM
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Canterbury!

The clue is in the reference to the town of Bingen.

The Nahe enters the Rhine at Bingen, so all you have to do is track it back south and then west through places like Bad Kreuznach, Bad Sobernheim, Kirn, Idar-Oberstein and beyond.

It is "Geheimtip" for those looking for something different in the way of wine country.

Harzer
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Old Jun 21st, 2006, 04:08 AM
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Thank you Harzer! Hopefully I'll get back to Germany early next year and can find the Nahe for myself.
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Old Jun 21st, 2006, 04:50 AM
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I agree Nahe wines are dry(ish) and preferred by many Germans who are tired of traditional, oversweet Spätlesen and Auslesen. While the wines themselves are fine (and should be drunk young), the towns along the Nahe are nothing special, mainly industrial (e.g Idar-Oberstein, centre of German jewellery manufacture), over-commercialised (e.g. Bad Kreuznach - a large modern spa with vast clinics) or plainly dull (e.g. Kirn).
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Old Jun 22nd, 2006, 04:29 PM
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Hi Alec!

After a half a dozen Nahe wines you will be past worrying.

But seriously, you are allowed to deviate from the river itself, which you do if you follow the designated scenic routes like:

Rüdesheim - Winterburg - Argenschwang -Gemünden - Simmertal

and:

Kirn - Hoxel - Idar-Oberstein

Harzer





Harzer
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