Past and present expatriates

Jul 10th, 2001, 11:30 AM
  #21  
John
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Former US expat in Scotland. I am forwarding this thread to the IRS.
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 11:39 AM
  #22  
Linda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I spent 16 years overseas with the U.S. Air Force. Sure miss it now that I'm retired (from the AF, not life)
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 01:43 PM
  #23  
XXX
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I'm a future expat going to Southern France please help to calm my nerves. We're going because of job relocation, maybe for good. I'm very concerned about the changes I need someone that has been through what I'm about to encounter to help calm my nerves. I've visited and it has always been a dream to move there like every vacation you take you want to move there, now that it's a reality the feeling is very different.
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 02:00 PM
  #24  
Ernie
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I spent much of my twenties in France with side trips to Spain, Italy and Austria. Money went far in Germany and Austria in those days after we whipped the krauts and sent Kaiser Bill running with his pants around his ankles and his shriveled ass for all to gaze at.
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 02:47 PM
  #25  
PB
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Tim,

You are correct...although technically (and legally) what I wrote was correct in my case. LOL.
Does anyone else have a problem keeping their languages 'separate' ??

Patricia
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 03:12 PM
  #26  
Linda
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
To PB: Yes, I do. I speak some Italian. But I moved from Italy to the French-speaking portion of Belgium. Was always trying to throw Italian words at my Belgian friends, and wondered why they didn't understand me! Now I'm learning Spanish. Having a basis in Italian (and 3 years of high school Latin) has helped, but, "Mama Mia", I DO get them mixed up.
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 03:31 PM
  #27  
Michele
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Currently US expats in London and spent 3 years in Singapore.

And we pay US taxes, John!
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 04:09 PM
  #28  
aimee
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I lived in Paris for a year approximately 9 years ago. I miss it terribly!
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 04:34 PM
  #29  
janis
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Patricia - I have that problem. My vocabulary is so "English" that I often can't remember the American terminology. It is all Multi-storey car park, not-to-worry, Aubergine, bonnet, boot, pavement, Ring up, motor, day return, etc, etc, etc.
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 05:10 PM
  #30  
rich
Guest
 
Posts: n/a


In 35 years of trying to find out where the dinosaurs died, three years in London, two in Cairo, three in Jakarta, three in Moscow and four in Oklahoma (perhaps the worst culture shock) . . with temporary assignments in Dubai, Norway, Netherlands, Libya, Iran and just about anywhere there were geological anomalies and deals to be made. Now finally able to go places and just see the sights!

Rich
 
Jul 10th, 2001, 07:50 PM
  #31  
z
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Am currently an expat in Moscow. The dinosaurs die hard here!
 
Jul 11th, 2001, 06:53 AM
  #32  
Tim
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Patricia, I concede that you're partially correct.

John, even I had to file a US tax return when I moved back home to Ireland for awhile, since I have a green card.

Just applied for citizenship. Should have done it before the election. Oh well. I learned my lesson.
 
Jul 11th, 2001, 08:11 AM
  #33  
jhm
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
For those expat wannabes, there's an article on combining your love of travel with work on today's msn.com page....
 
Jul 14th, 2001, 01:48 AM
  #34  
HMMMM!
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
So why don't more people work overseas? It seems a great way to see the world.
 
Jul 14th, 2001, 01:52 PM
  #35  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Tim: Actually, you mean you're "partly" correct. "Partially" means with bias. Or maybe you did mean that? Anyway, back to the discussion.
 
Jul 14th, 2001, 11:02 PM
  #36  
Michelle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I know the original question concerned the number of expatriates on this board, however, there are some interesting figures in this morning's Sunday Times (London).

It's estimated there are 240,000 US nationals in Britian working in subsidiaries of US companies, 70% of London's financial institutions are US owned, 2,384 US firms are registered in Britian. It seems there's lots of scope for becoming an expat in Europe (as surely these statistics are reflected in other European countries even if not to the same extent) as long as you are in the right industry.

I've been an expat for 24 years and therefore most of my friends are expat too. It's quite amazing how the world truly has become a global marketplace.
 
Jul 15th, 2001, 01:24 AM
  #37  
Ann
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Followiing on from Michelle's point, there are huge ex-pat communities in Paris too.

I always felt it was in fact something of a disadvantage, in that people tended to stay very close to their own community. It could actually have provided the right person with the material for a fascinating study because there were communities within the communities, some overlapping etc. However, altough I can understand why, I was interested to see just how many ex-pats refused to have anything to do with the local community. I knew some who didn't speak any French, wouldn't go to French lessons or drive at all.
 
Jul 15th, 2001, 01:38 AM
  #38  
Chris
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Ann

I haven't joined any "groups", because I didn't want to be surrounded by Americans all the time. I'm in France, for heaven's sake! It's a relief to speak with another American, to be sure, and I know I'm missing out on activities organized by the groups, but I like immersing myself in the culture, the language (although I am very nervous when I speak French), etc.

I don't drive (ohmygosh -- I'd have been in countless accidents because I DO stop for red lights), but I took French lessons for 10 months. And there weren't that many English speakers in my classes (only 3, over all those months).
But people are different too -- I have little trouble getting out there and doing things on my own, while one of my friends hadn't seen too many museums (or shopping districts) in Lyon because she was working and also because she didn't like to do things by herself. A group would have been good for her.

I can appreciate missing things about the US -- I do too -- but don't "we" get upset when someone moves to the US and doesn't bother to learn English?

The experience of living in a different country is amazing, and one that is maximized by trying to "go native". It can be frustrating too, but only more so if you need to be surrounded by "your" things. My shoulders are really loose from all that shrugging -- "c'est comme ca!"
 
Jul 15th, 2001, 02:48 AM
  #39  
Ann
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Chris, I agree with what you are saying, especially about everyone being different. It has made me much more understanding of people who come to our country and have difficulties with the language. Although I never approached fluency, I swear I became less fluent as time went on! Or perhaps I just became more and more aware of how much more there was to learn.

 
Jul 15th, 2001, 04:35 AM
  #40  
Michelle
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I too can see both sides of this expat dilemma. Wherever I've been (mainly US/Middle East/Netherland/Asia) I've always used the opportunity to explore area both geographically and mentally (if that's the right word), which involves trying to use the language and being interested in the local culture. However, the greater the distance between the culture to which I belong and the culture in which I'm living, the more I appreciate those times when I can relax with people who have the same background to me. There is a definite kind of shorthand you use with your own kind which alleviates constant explanations. I've loved being an expat, IMO, it's a great way of life and a great way to see the world.
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:02 AM.