Paris tipping hotel maids

Old Jul 26th, 2015, 07:45 AM
  #21  
 
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But also:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/tr...al-salary.html

http://www.euronews.com/2013/09/24/h...aris-fashion-/
question: is 1300 euros a month a living wage in Paris?

http://www.thelocal.fr/20141022/pari...r-better-wages

http://www.ndtv.com/world-news/one-b...ter-pay-682764

http://revolting-europe.com/2014/09/...luxury-hotels/
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 07:58 AM
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The basic way we work in Europe is like this:

How much is a room? €110.
When you check out, you pay them €110.

You'll soon get the hang of it, even if you're used to....

How much is a room? $110
When you check out, you have to pay them $134.76
And did you remember to leave $ for the maid, $ for the porter, $ for the maintenance man.....

;0)
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 08:20 AM
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"The basic way we work in Europe is like this:
How much is a room? €110.
When you check out, you pay them €110."

Actually, that's not true everywhere. Booking.com recently emailed us to let us know that there will be new charges applied for our hotel stays in Italy above the rate that was listed when we reserved, due to new taxes/charges from the locations where we're staying.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 08:53 AM
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WeisserTee, do you tip everybody who deserves better wages? Supermarket cashiers, street sweepers, postal workers, airport check-in staff?
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 08:55 AM
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Thoughts for kerouac:

It is the greatest of all mistakes to do nothing because you can only do little — do what you can. ~Sydney Smith

Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little. ~Edmund Burke

Never worry about numbers. Help one person at a time, and always start with the person nearest you. ~Mother Teresa
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 08:56 AM
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Now we're getting into it. That's the spirit!
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 09:00 AM
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White Tea

In Paris you have to pay the local tax,something like 1-2 €.
When booking (and prepaying) with Hotels.Com, you stil lhave to pay the tax when leaving.
I seem to remember in Koeln they asked me if I wanted to pay for a cultural/city/touristic tax ?


Wages in France :
http://www.europe1.fr/economie/un-fr...t-vous-1938783

Average NET wages in France : 2128 €/month
Median NET wages in FRance : 1712 €/month.
Median means that 50% of the people in France make LESS than 1712, and 50% MORE than 1712.
(I like stats, even if it bores some) more here : per country.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salaire_moyen_par_pays

So a cleaning lady would probably be close to SMIC (minimum legal wages), which is 1457,52 €/month.

She might get less if she is illegally in France and her employer is not declaring here.
On top of it you must add some money for allocation familiales (based on nr of childre you have).

Can we live with about 1500 € per month ? I let it for everyone to judge.

But contrary to what I read about the US, all (most) health care is free, and a retirement income is provided on the basis of these wages.

So 'net' money is what you can spend.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 11:57 AM
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<i>So a cleaning lady would probably be close to SMIC (minimum legal wages), which is 1457.52 €/month.</i>

Much less. The SMIC <b>NET</b> is only 1,139.02 euros a month.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 12:27 PM
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Tipping and Rick Steve's in the same thread. Great.
Oh Boy! Let's make it a true free for all and someone ask what they should wear while they are NOT visiting museums in Paris.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 01:23 PM
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<Tipping and Rick Steve's in the same thread. Great.
Oh Boy! Let's make it a true free for all and someone ask what they should wear while they are NOT visiting museums in Paris.>

lol!

How about we also ask if you can visit 10 countries in 7 days?
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 02:19 PM
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>>Tipping and Rick Steve's in the same thread. Great.
Oh Boy!<<

snort

Tipping threads always end up pretty ridiculous
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 06:40 PM
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I am just so used to tipping in the states that honestly I feel really strange not leaving anything so I'll either round up the bill or leave loose change that I have. It's awkward for me. I guess no one turns down money and I certainly don't tip like I do at home. I don't tip all the time, just depends.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 06:52 PM
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@ crefloors: It can be hard to make the adjustment, but think about this: One reason for NOT tipping in a culture in which tipping is not expected is that doing so can contribute to some negative stereotypes about Americans (or others) who tip – that Americans are culturally insensitive, think we can buy anything and/or anyone, don’t understand the value of money, don’t appreciate the professionalism of those with whom we interact, want to flaunt our wealth, are stupid or careless, etc. Do you really want to PAY to contribute to these stereotypes? I don't!
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 07:08 PM
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We always tip the maid at least 2.00€ per night. We also bring omiyage to the staff since some has become friends from repeated visits. I don't see any anything wrong with it.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 08:46 PM
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I tip too - a couple of euro daily. Doesn't matter to me if others don't.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 10:03 PM
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I will remember not to tip in the United States.
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 11:30 PM
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WT - oh for heaven's sake, talk about missing the point!

So, you would be upset if a foreigner came to the US and violated local custom by not tipping. What is so all-fired difficult for you to see that visiting a non-tipping country and violating local norms by tipping IS JUST AS BAD!
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Old Jul 26th, 2015, 11:43 PM
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Exactly.. some of you are very disrespectful about the tipping culture in other countries.. but fully expect others to respect YOUR countries tipping culture..

Also.. Rick Steves is most definitely not for backpackers.. but I can only assume the poster who said that has little idea of what that even means.. to backpack.. bet he thinks paying 150 euros a night for a room is slumming it.. lol .

I am not even going to disclose my tipping habits.. other then to say I temper them significantly in Europe, because I try to respect what ever the customs are where ever I am.. and I do not ASS u ME that my country has it right and other countries have it wrong..
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Old Jul 27th, 2015, 12:36 AM
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Bravo/ Brava Thursdaysyd!
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Old Jul 27th, 2015, 02:13 AM
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When my wife and I started coming to France, in the early '70's, we didn't understand the tipping situation - no travel forums, no internet, no "correct" information, then! So, we tipped as we were used to doing at home in the US.

Later on, we realized that this was not the cultural norm, and weaned ourselves from this nasty habit, even though we thought it was difficult to just "walk away scot free". In so doing, we found that we were treated exactly the same as if we had tipped, by the people who served our meals and cleaned our rooms.

Still later on, when we were in the process of moving to Paris for work, we found out exactly what salaried workers were paid and had a look at the long list of benefits they are entitled to. After that, we felt much better about never tipping at all.

There will always be employers who take advantage of illegal immigrant workers - in Europe and everywhere else. This is sad, very sad - but how are you to know who is in this position? Will you ask them? More importantly, will they answer truthfully? The person who cleaned your room might well be a French national, whose taxes pay for health care, housing subsidies, child benefits, etc.

Furthermore, the little bits of change you might leave would surely add up eventually - but would not make a huge difference in the quality of someone's daily life. Don't kid yourself with this "noblesse oblige" attitude.
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