Paris hotel walking distances question

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Jan 3rd, 2005, 03:34 PM
  #1
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Paris hotel walking distances question

OK, after a year reading myself blue in the face, I've narrowed myself down to a couple of Paris hotels. They appear to be in the same price range so that's not too much the issue. I think I've eliminated the Madison because the Euro keeps climbing and because it looks a bit further than the other 2 for walking to sights I want to see. The location of the Fleurie looks good for walking to Pont Neuf and the islands in the Seine, and the Luxembourg Garden. However, Millesime looks like it might be a bit nicer and the rooms slightly larger. Website says 'recently refurbished'. I pulled up one of those maps with 'dots for hotels' on it. Is anyone familiar with walking distances in St. Germain able to say if there's any appreciable difference here? FWIW, I don't want a hotel breakfast, but an actual shower would be wonderful. I've read comments on Fleurie but not much on Millesime. I'm not planning to ride the Metro at all, so location is my main question. Merci.
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 03:49 PM
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I'm a walker and to me it doesn't make a bit of difference between those three hotels. What is slightly closer to one is going to be slightly further from another.

That said, we rarely take the Metro either and walk from our St. Germain location to the Eiffel Tower, the Arch, Bastille, or the Pompidou Center and think nothing of it. The places you mention are a "stroll" as far as I'm concerned.
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 04:36 PM
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Thanks. I've discovered that sometimes maps will leave out minor streets so you think you're looking at 4 blocks when it's more like 12. Also, oops, I saw when re-reading that someone mentioned mappy.com has a pedestrian site which I'll try. Anyone know if most Paris hotels give you a complimentary map--even if a rudimentary cartoon one?
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 04:39 PM
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I'll suggest that you invest $5 or so in a
Streetwise Paris map, available at most chain bookstores or at amazon.com
It is foldable, waterproof, and has as much detail as most people need for walking around in the center of Paris.
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 05:09 PM
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Actually our favorite & most useful map turned out to be the free one from our hotel lobby (I believe sponsored by Samaritaine-sp? department store). Great for the overview - for walking all day (say from Eiffle Tower back to Luxembourg Gardens). Our guidebook maps were by arrondisement and less useful since we weren't looking for a particular street address.
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 05:26 PM
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All Paris hotels that we've stayed at, ever, has provided maps that are actually more than rudimentary. I've found all the large and small streets that we needed to walk or drive on.
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Jan 3rd, 2005, 07:36 PM
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I don't think the location of those hotels is that different that it would affect things much, they aren't that far apart.

All hotels I've stayed at give you a map of the city, they get them from free the dept. stores, etc. They are perfectly fine for getting around the city and have all major streets. Any map I've gotten (from cheapest to most detailed) has a distance scale on it so you can easily tell the approximate distances on it, except maybe the free McDonalds Paris map. Streetwise has a distance scale on it, for example, and so do the hotel maps I've gotten that were sponsored by the dept. stores. the Printemps maps are very good as they include the entire Paris metro area and the suburban edges.

The Madison and Fleurie aren't very far apart, I wouldn't choose on that factor, although price may be an issue, I agree.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 05:43 AM
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Hi hope,

Go to www.mappy.com and enter your departure and destination.

Change "express" to pedestrian. It will give you the suggested walking route.


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Jan 4th, 2005, 05:54 AM
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The three hotels you cite are in the same general area and all within walking distance (assuming you are a walker) of the major sights in central Paris. I have never stayed at the Madison or the Millesme but the Fleurie is a very nice hotel. Search, using the hotel names, on this forum and on Trip Advisor to get comments from those who have stayed in the hotels. And, by all means, get a Streetwise Paris map. It is the best although we use the hotel map as a backup should we spend time apart during the day.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 06:50 AM
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The Millesime is about 2 city blocks closer to the Seine , so distance wise there is not much difference at all. We've always enjoyed tour stays at the Millesime. The superior rooms are quite large and fresh looking. The staff is very pleasant and helpful. They also serve a very nice buffet breakfast , however it's not included in most of theeir rates. It's a sister hotel of the D'Aubusson so the service is 1st rate.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 08:01 AM
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I'm leaning toward the Millesime. The Madison looks lovely, but looks like I could squeeze a few meals out of the price difference. Thanks guys for giving me a perspective on the distances. We won't have many nights in Paris but I'm assuming any other future trips to France would take off from there. In Paris hotels, do the prices climb as one goes to a higher floor? For quiet and quaintness is it best to ask for a courtyard room? Should I expect an elevator in hotels at this price range?
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Jan 4th, 2005, 08:08 AM
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Hi hope,

>In Paris hotels, do the prices climb as one goes to a higher floor? For quiet and quaintness is it best to ask for a courtyard room? Should I expect an elevator in hotels at this price range?<

Not necessarily.

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Jan 4th, 2005, 08:35 AM
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hopingtotravel -

You didn't say why you're not planning to ride the Métro, so this post may be way off target, but here goes.

If cost is an issue for you (you mention the Euro climbing and squeezing meals and whatnot), I suggest you revisit your intention of not using the excellent public transport available in Paris.

I think bedding down in proximity to the sights in order to avoid paying a couple of Euro a day on the Métro or bus is false economy. Hotels cost more the closer you get to Île de la Cité, making those within the "inner ring" of arrondissements (1-8) considerably more expensive than something further out.

If I were optimizing a trip based on cost, I'd probably stay somewhere out by the Peripherique, and spend my 10-15 minute commute on the subway instead of on walking from somewhere closer. If you buy a Carte Orange, you can use all the transport freely for as little €2.20 a day.

Your time in Paris is precious - don't squander it in forced march from place to place. That's what the bus system is for.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 10:37 AM
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It's kind of hard to tell about room location for quietness. Courtyard location is probably quieter much of the time, but I've had rooms where they were actually noisier because those courtyards make sound echo and if it's really a courtyard (many are not, just kind of spaces) some people may be out there talking loudly. Quaintness isn't usually an issue, but I would avoid any ground floor room anywhere for lots of reasons.

Prices don't rise by floor in lots of hotels, and I know they don't in my favorite one, but that would be a factor of which rooms the hotel calls superior/deluxe, not just the floor, most likely. In some hotels, the upper floors may be the ones they call superior/deluxe.

You should definitely expect an elevator in those hotels, and any 3* hotel. I've had them in every 2* hotel I've been in, except rural ones that were only a couple floors. Most Parisian hotels have more floors than that due to city buildings, and most 2* and above have elevators.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 05:16 PM
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Have enjoyed staying at the Fleurie. Small and personal. There is a tiny elevator. There are only about 25+ rooms. The hotel was quiet and perfectly located. Staying in this area offers access to wonderful walks, great cafes, and beautiful neighborhoods. One night we browsed through Au Bon Marche as part of an evening walk. Easy walk to Louvre, Notre Dame and Musee d'Orsay. Gracious hosts. Continental breakfast is about 10 euros, but there are also bakeries and a small grocery store in the area.
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Jan 4th, 2005, 08:20 PM
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Not riding the Metro isn't a cost issue. I know it's weird; I wouldn't go in the London tubes either. Pul-eeeze no comments on that!
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Jan 4th, 2005, 08:40 PM
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I expect that most hotels in the price range of the ones you're considering are in the 3* range, in which case it would be surprising if they didn't have elevators. Certainly the Madison does--two, in fact (both small but adequate). The Madison is quite close to a number of major sights and is just about two blocks from the Seine. But the hotel, our favorite, is certainly getting quite pricey, especially if you want to stay during September and October, when there's now a surcharge.

If you want to be near the Luxembourg Gardens, consider Le Sainte-Beuve.
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Jan 5th, 2005, 07:07 AM
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I know it's weird; I wouldn't go in the London tubes either. That's intruiging, because millions of people use the subway every year. What's your objection? Going under ground? How about buses?
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Jan 5th, 2005, 10:43 AM
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Underhill, the generous amount of time you've spent on this forum has been most helpful! I'm hoping to not spend a lot of time IN my hotel in Paris, so want to apply the price difference to a splurgy meal at Columbe d'Or or such.
As for busses: yes, I rode them in London and Dublin, so I can do that. We took taxis all over London but it doesn't sound as though they are so prevalent in Paris. Am looking forward to trying the bateaux mouches.
I have queries in to two of the hotels.
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Jan 5th, 2005, 10:25 PM
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I stayed in a regular (not upgraded) room at the Millesime last April and it was wonderful. The windows are double or triple glazed. Our room looked out on the Rue Jacob, and I couldn't hear any street noise. I am a stickler for a quiet room, and this met the test. Please be advised that the recent redecorating has changed all beds to queens. There are no longer any rooms with two beds, nor is there even one room with a king bed....in case this makes a difference to you.
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