Paris Airbnb

Sep 7th, 2017, 09:33 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
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Check again in October when the official apartment registration law goes into effect. Starting then, it will be illegal for any rental site to post Paris apartments without mentioning their registration number proving that it is a legal rental.
kerouac is offline  
Sep 7th, 2017, 12:51 PM
  #22  
 
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Jeeze - editing when there is no edit function is not easy should have said >>Believe me -- I'd LOVE to be able to rent apartments again - but I do try not to follow the laws and customs where I am a visitor.<<
janisj is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 07:31 AM
  #23  
 
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And many of these apartments do not have dryers.
The washing machine does just a small load, and just spins dry, so you have to use hanging racks to get anything to dry.
Which in Autumn, is practically impossible to do.
fuzzbucket is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 08:08 AM
  #24  
 
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Yes, fuzzy, absurd. You are woefully uninformed. Almost all of the apartments listed on Airbnb have no one living in them full-time and therein lies the problem.
MmePerdu is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 08:29 AM
  #25  
 
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Almost all of the apartments listed on Airbnb have no one living in them full-time and therein lies the problem.

You mean most of the apartments currently listed have no one living in them. That might be dramatically different in just a few short months when airbnb will only list registered apartments.
Sarastro is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 09:14 AM
  #26  
 
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"You mean most of the apartments currently listed have no one living in them."

Yes, of course. It will be very interesting to see what happens as the new regulations begin to be enforced. Since they allow, as I understand it, rental of an otherwise occupied residence for part of the year, how people bend that to their desire to continue as before.

Maybe filling a closet will be imagined as fulfilling the requirement for a legally occupied residence. We can only wait & see. I cannot imagine all of those may who now earn the bulk of their income with vacation rentals giving up without a fight, at least trying for the illusion of occupation, one family member ensconced for effect in each vacation rental.
MmePerdu is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 10:04 AM
  #27  
 
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We had wonderful airbnb and vrbo apartment stays in Paris with our two girls over the years, and regret that I would not do it again. Or in NYC, any other city with a concentrated tourist area where locals can no longer afford to live.

Kansas City, spare room, yes. Outskirts of Rome, maybe.
stokebailey is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 10:50 AM
  #28  
 
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Though I did rent an apartment for my last 2 visits, I have to say I wasn't really any happier than I've been countless times in hotels. In fact, as I'm usually on my own, I really think I may prefer the ambiance of a small hotel in one of the out-of-the-way neighborhoods I prefer. I don't think I'll suffer.

As I think about it, it might make me wonder about the sort of person my host might be if they are clearly flouting the law after the government has been as clear as they apparently have been on the regulations.
MmePerdu is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 11:23 AM
  #29  
 
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I have only used AirBnB four times, a couple of years back. I was careful even then to rent from people with only one listing, and two of the apartments (one was a self-contained room, the fourth an apparently legal apartment in Barcelona) certainly had stuffed closets. I had to clear stuff out in order to use them myself.

But I entirely agree that those are not the major issue, although I still think that long term residents of apartmnet buildings should be able to veto such use.
thursdaysd is offline  
Sep 8th, 2017, 04:04 PM
  #30  
 
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Glad to hear about Rome, Massimo. That was my impression, too.
stokebailey is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 02:03 AM
  #31  
 
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Most laws are written by wealthy lawyers who are paid by wealthy constituents. Most of these folk are politicians or connected to them.

That´s unfortunately true in some countries but perhaps not in France. There is an enormous number of residents who do not want their apartment buildings turned into makeshift hotels. Do not underestimate the amount of anti-airbnb backlash by neighbors and apartment owners themselves who believe that their individual rights to privacy have been bridged by an invasive nuisance.

Add in concern for the thousands of residents who have lost apartments as owners turn them into short term vacation rentals because they make more money. Consider the neighborhoods which lose small businesses as their clientèle is forced to live elsewhere.

Many voters are not happy with what has been happening in their neighborhoods and elected officials have taken note.

The vacation apartment situation in Paris involves more than voices of a few tourists demanding their right to rent apartments short term in an effort to live like a local.
Sarastro is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 08:21 AM
  #32  
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Apparently we've forgotten that this was a post about recommendations, I didn't know the recommendations would come with so much drama about morals and the laws and regulations that visitors "should" adhere to. I agree that as travelers we should respect conditions that are put in place by the county we are visiting, for that reason, I've decided to go with a hotel because I would not want to run into issues, and the last thing I want to do is run around Paris trying to find a last minute accommodations because something is wrong with the apartment.
starzizzle is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 08:24 AM
  #33  
 
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Good for you. Did you check the apartment hotels?
thursdaysd is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 08:36 AM
  #34  
 
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Welcome to Fodors. You find some good info and a lot of garbage.
Pay attention to apart hotels if you sleep 4.
Often 2 are on a sofa. My back still remembers the sofa of the (legal) citadines of Les Halles.
Whathello is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 08:54 AM
  #35  
bvh
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
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"I've decided to go with a hotel because I would not want to run into issues"

This is the same reason expressed by travelers for decades, long before the internet existed. There were never any guarantees when renting an apartment in Paris. Vacation rentals always came with risk. Airbnb made the process a bit more trustworthy with its review system. Its popularity grew very fast. Then came the revolt.

"There is an enormous number of residents who do not want their apartment buildings turned into makeshift hotels."

Maybe the number is "enormous" from the perspective of posters who post here, but I think the statement is overblown. A false reality. Paris will never become Venice. Some might argue that the vacation rental market is helping to save Venice simply because there aren't enough young people who wish to live there, work there, and raise a family there.
bvh is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 09:58 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
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The Citadines apart'hotel at Richard Lenoir is very nice and legal. You'll have access to good transportation and the Bastille market is nearby - Thurs and Sun mornings until about 1 PM.
Also a Casino supermarket is close by for other essentials.
A kitchen, air-conditioning and once-a-week maid service comes with it.
fuzzbucket is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 10:31 AM
  #37  
 
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Some might argue that the vacation rental market is helping to save Venice simply because there aren't enough young people who wish to live there, work there, and raise a family there.

And young venetians would say that their being able to live and work viably in Venice is destroyed because of the focus on tourism.
menachem is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 10:40 AM
  #38  
 
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Maybe the number is "enormous" from the perspective of posters who post here, but I think the statement is overblown. A false reality.

bvh - so you think that those who live in Paris enjoy having strangers coming and going in their buildings. Where did you meet these Parisians because I have not talked to a single one of them? The people I know and specifically my neighbors have done everything possible to keep short term rentals out of our buildings. We honestly consider it a scourge.

There is nothing false about our concern for security and our right to privacy. What is not discussed here sufficiently often is that apartment owners really do not want strangers in their buildings and have a rather healthy disdain for those who attempt to disobey rental laws.
Sarastro is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 11:15 AM
  #39  
 
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"Maybe the number is "enormous" from the perspective of posters who post here, but I think the statement is overblown. A false reality."

Sounds like wishful thinking to me.
thursdaysd is offline  
Sep 9th, 2017, 12:30 PM
  #40  
 
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-Some might argue that the vacation rental market is helping to save Venice simply because there aren't enough young people who wish to live there, work there, and raise a family there.-

The vacation rental market is saving Venice. OK whatever.

There would be more young Venetian families living in Venice if they could afford it. Many still work in Venice but cannot afford to live in Venice. Its not just vacation rentals, but tourism in general is killing Venice, not saving it.

Sorry to respond to the off topic post but I so 100 percent disagreeing that I can't help it.

Vacation rental market helping to save Venice. What the f times infinity. Truly.
rialtogrl is offline  

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