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On-flight "bring your own dinner" suggestions

On-flight "bring your own dinner" suggestions

Feb 15th, 2001, 08:16 AM
  #1  
michele
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On-flight "bring your own dinner" suggestions

If you don't eat the airline food, what do you bring for dinner?

 
Feb 15th, 2001, 08:19 AM
  #2  
mary times
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A good bottle of scotch.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 08:25 AM
  #3  
janice
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A full-blown picnic - sandwiches, fruit, chips and salsa, the works. By the time you're off the plane in Europe, you're one bag lighter already! We always have some dried fruit, a Powerbar or two, and other non-perishable snackish stuff with us too. I've spent a few too many nights in airports with no food available, and I'm always prepared now.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 08:46 AM
  #4  
Tony Hughes
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The woman with the large bust who sat in front of me from Minneapolis to Amsterdam had purchased McDonalds for her and bother her kids (I would say about 15 and 10 years old) which stank the plane out. They ate them before we had even taken off.

Personally I always eat what's put down to me (although not always - see pasta thread) but I suppose taking your favourite food would take your mind off the tedium of a long flight. Avoid things that drip or things whose smell drifts or small oranges (satsumas etc) that can squirt someone in the eye.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 08:53 AM
  #5  
angel
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I love oranges, but they're not the easiest thing to manage. What I do is peel them at home, open the sections a bit, and put them in a Zip-loc bag. Much easier to handle; don't have to worry about peelings and less-messy hands. (Might also tell you if you've chosen a good one.)

I'm big on granola bars. Even just for running errands around town, playing golf, etc., I keep a couple on hand. They've tided me over many a time.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 09:11 AM
  #6  
Diane
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I think it was Elvira who recommended ordering the fruit plate -- I've since put it in my profile on biztravel (I use them almost constantly now) and Voila! On my last trip cross-country (Vegas to DC) I had a lovely and varied selection of fresh fruit while my seatmates had re-heated cheeseburgers or bar-b-ques. That was on Continental. Since we're flying USAirways to Italy in May, I'm expecting the same. Fruits and raw veggies really do help fight off jet-lag. But if we ever again fly Air France, I'll take their meals any day. Also, if upgraded, the food is generally more appealing than in tourist.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 09:26 AM
  #7  
CJD
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Steak Tartare
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 09:33 AM
  #8  
llll
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i try to eat before and bring some snacking, easy-to-eat food along.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 10:12 AM
  #9  
Ess
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I like to eat a little something before I leave - that way I'm not dependent upon airplane food. Actually, most airplane food that I've had isn't TOO awful. They usually give you something edible amongst the unidentifiables, a salad, some fruit, some cheese and crackers, or SOMETHING. I figure if I can't go a few hours without stuffing my face, I should just stay home in the doublewide in front of the tv with the doritos anyway. I save my appetite for my destination. Speaking of appetites, I don't understand why people sit in the departure lounge stuffing themselves with airport junk food. I see this now wherever I go. I don't mean people who have had flights cancelled and are really hungry and have no choice, but just eating junk food because it's there. Maybe it helps pass the time, but I really think that's disgusting. Thank you for letting me sound off on that. I guess I'm turning into one of those cranky Fodors posters.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 11:30 AM
  #10  
noname
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What about all those big signs that warn of $2,000 fines if you bring fresh fruit or vegetables beyond a certain point? We used to bring sliced up apples in a ziplock bag and would chicken out every time we got to those signs.
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 11:33 AM
  #11  
Phil
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On your way back I suggest a very ripe French raw-milk soft cheese (Epoisses, Ami du Chambertin or similar): either this will give you enough space (about three rows is my guess) or you will be thrown out of the plane. At any rate the sheer delight will be worth the risk ;-)

Enjoy your cheeses -- uh -- trip

Phil
 
Feb 15th, 2001, 12:39 PM
  #12  
Smart Alec
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Canned foods, an electic can opener, and a realllllllly long extension cord.
 

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