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Necropolis Tour - walk-up tickets available?

Necropolis Tour - walk-up tickets available?

Mar 18th, 2015, 02:02 PM
  #1  
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Necropolis Tour - walk-up tickets available?

I've emailed the ticket office, but haven't gotten a response, so I thought I'd ask here. The Necropolis tours for our time in Rome are sold out. Do tickets ever become available on the morning one wants to visit? Someone suggested we try this for Last Supper tickets in Milan.

If they aren't, we'll figure out something else we want to see, but I figure it doesn't hurt to ask.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 18th, 2015, 07:27 PM
  #2  
 
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Are you talking about the Scavi tour or the Necropolis tour?
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 18th, 2015, 07:29 PM
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The Scavi tour.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 18th, 2015, 08:14 PM
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The problem with the Scavi tour is you can't access the ticket office without the email ticket. There are security checks (show your ticket, put your stuff through a scanner, etc.). The first check is Vatican personnel and the second Swiss Guard (or was). You have to show your papers both times I think. I talked my way through once, but that was before the scanners were being used and I was alone (more likely to have one spot than multiple spots). I did snag a tour, but had to come back an hour or two later (don't remember the details as I've been several times).

The other issue is timing. There are a small amount of tours each day and even less in English (can you do another language tour?). I think having someone at your hotel call the Scavi office (even better if you are staying at a convent and a nun calls!) you might have better results.

My last visit, the tour was not full (it was early September - high season). I was surprised.

Did you get a confirmation email that they received your email? They used to send one and I assume they still do.

For anyone searching these tours in the future:

Scavi tour:

http://www.vatican.va/various/basili...formazioni.htm

Necropolis of via Triumphalis:

http://mv.vatican.va/3_EN/pages/z-In..._Evento16.html
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 19th, 2015, 11:46 AM
  #5  
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Thanks for all that helpful information, kybourbon. I didn't know about the other Necropolis tour! It looks like they only offer it in combination with a Vatican Museums ticket, and we've already bought those.

I received emails telling me there was no space available on the days we have in Rome.

We're using Airbnb, so no concierge or nun or anyone like that. I think we'll have to go see the catacombs instead.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 19th, 2015, 01:20 PM
  #6  
 
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You seem to only have two days in Rome which is barely enough time to see a couple of the major sites in the historic center. The catacombs are out of the center and not exactly the easiest to reach. Unless that is an absolute must see, I would stick to central Rome. If you want something underground, stop by San Clemente (not far from the Colosseum) and go down to the early levels.

http://basilicasanclemente.com/eng/

If you want to see bones, pop into the Capuchin Crypt (right by the Barberini metro stop - bottom of Via Veneto). Last time I was in there, you just donated on the way out (no set fee).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capuchin_Crypt

There are other underground things in central Rome. I think Kristina wrote about several on one of her Rome trip reports (not sure which years).

http://www.wired2theworld.com/our-travels/europe/
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 19th, 2015, 01:49 PM
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If you want to visit a catacomb, the quickest and easiest to reach is the Catacomb of Saint Agnes on the Via Nomentana. You can get there by the B1 metro (destination Conca d'Oro) or by the number 90 express bus from Termini station.

The Catacomb of Saint Agnes is interesting more for the whole complex in which it's located than for the catacomb itself. This is the only catacomb that grew up around the tomb of a martyr, Saint Agnes. She was murdered in the early 4th century supposedly because she refused to marry the son of a Roman official. Her foster sister, Saint Emerentiana (the daughter of Saint Agnes' nursemaid), was also murdered, because she refused to stop praying at the tomb of Saint Agnes.

The murder of these two young girls (about 12 years old at the time) shocked Romans, even the non-Christians. Pilgrims came to their tombs, and people wanted to be buried near them. The Emperor Constantine built a basilica at the site in the 4th century and his daughter Costanza built a mausoleum near it so she could be buried there. However she died away from Rome, and was buried where she died; the mausoleum was turned into a church, which is one of the most intact ancient buildings in Rome. You can visit this church, which has beautiful 4th century mosaics on the ceiling of the ambulatory, including one that depicts an ancient Roman grape harvest.

The catacomb is entered through a door in the nave of the 7th century basilica, partly underground, that replaced the earlier one. The catacomb itself has little of artistic interest, but there is a very nice golden mosaic in the apse of the basilica. There are interesting fragments of ancient tombs along the steps leading down to the basilica. The tour ends in the crypt of the Basilica, where the two young martyrs are buried together.

Behind a fence, near the Church of Santa Costanza, you can see the ruins of the 4th century basilica built by Constantine.

You can get there in less than half an hour from central Rome. The catacomb is large, but the tour takes you to just a small portion of it, so it doesn't take long. I've been there twice, and both times there were just a few people in our group. The young women who were our guides were both excellent.
bvlenci is online now  
Mar 19th, 2015, 07:27 PM
  #8  
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We're staying near the Colosseum, so San Clemente may work. Mr. Pickle looked over my shoulder and says he's interested in the Capuchin Crypt. They've added a museum, so it's six Euros now to see it, but that seems reasonable. I want to see the Bernini St. Teresa sculpture, so we could go to Santa Maria della Vittoria first, then to the Capuchin Crypt.

We arrive on May 3rd at 11:15, and after we drop our bags at our apartment and grab a quick lunch, we want to go to the Colosseum and Forum since it's right next to where we're staying.

Since it's the first Sunday in May, there is no admission fee. I'm guessing it may be crowded, but we'll just deal with it. Do they still make you wait in line for some kind of entrance ticket on the free days?

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 19th, 2015, 08:28 PM
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>>>They've added a museum, so it's six Euros now to see it, but that seems reasonable.<<<

Are they connected or separate? I seem to recall a separate entrance?

You have to be careful about times when visiting churches as many will close in the afternoon for several hours. You don't want to waste time trekking to one to discover it's closed.

>>>We're staying near the Colosseum<<<

What street? You might find the electric bus 117 helpful depending on where you are staying.

http://atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=9

A couple of the trams might be useful also (#3 has stops at the Colosseum and on Nomentana - might get you close to bvlenci's suggestion).

http://atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=5

Transportation tickets are 1.50€ (be sure to validate) or a 24 hour ticket is 7€. Good for metro/trams/buses and some local trains (to the red stops).

http://atac.roma.it/files/doc.asp?r=4

I think you can visit the lower level of Santa Cecilia in Trastevere also. The Rome Tourist Board lists 268 historic churches in the center. Several have lower levels.

http://www.060608.it/en/cultura-e-sv...rico-artistico

Don't trust the times on the tourist board as churches change their times.
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 20th, 2015, 01:27 PM
  #10  
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>>Are they connected or separate? I seem to recall a separate entrance?<<

It sounds like they're connected, according to this website:
http://www.cappuccinilazio.com/conventodeicappuccini/

We are staying on Via San Giovanni in Laterano, about a block east of San Clemente. Thanks for the transportation link; we still need to work out how to get where we want to go.

I'd read about churches closing in the early afternoon. I think we'll visit the Capuchins first thing in the morning, then go to Santa Maria della Vittoria before it closes at noon.

Thanks again for the help!

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Mar 20th, 2015, 07:52 PM
  #11  
 
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You might want to visit Santa Maria della Vittoria first (perhaps take the subway to Repubblica, then walk). The Capuchin crypt appears to be open all day. That way, if you are walking between the two, it will be downhill.
kybourbon is offline  
Mar 22nd, 2015, 08:37 PM
  #12  
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Downhill is good. Thanks for the tip!

Lee Ann
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