N1 and E2 London

Old Sep 26th, 2005, 01:45 PM
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N1 and E2 London

I will be in London for a week in early November trying to cram in as much as I can. Want to go to White Cube and look at other galleries in Hoxton, probably on a weekday. I thought I might go to the Geffrye the same day. Are the two within reasonable walking distance from each other? I am a New Yorker and don't mind walking as long as it's not pouring outside. Any other suggestions about shopping, interesting things to do and/or moderately priced cafes/restaurants in the immediate area? Thanks.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 01:56 PM
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It's a bit passé now really. In my opinion it's an ugly area. It's a little bit like wearing "designer" clothes that are made in China.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 02:53 PM
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Yes, it seems a lot of people think the area is over. But I'm not going because it's trendy or not trendy - just planning to go to White Cube and the Geffrye and also look at some of the current artists exhibiting in galleries there. I figure it is probably like Williamsburg here in NYC, which is similarly called passe still a nice way to spend an afternoon.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 05:36 PM
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The two are quite near each other. Go via Old street Tube station. Hoxton Square/White Cube are about 1/4 mile up Old street from the tube station.

And then the Geffreye is another 1/4 mile or a bit more out Kingsland Rd.

Then after visiting the Geffrye you could either go back the same way to Old Street, or down Shorditch to Liverpool Street tube/mainline.

I've walked from Old street tube to the Geffreye 5 or 6 times - not a bad walk at all.

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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 06:44 PM
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Next question: Is it realistic for me to be able to visit White Cube/Hoxton galleries, then the Geffryes then pop over to Islington to the shops and Camden Passage [either on a Wed (antiques) or Thursday (books)]? Or is this too much to cover in a 10am-5pm period? Many thanks.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 07:35 PM
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I think your plan is definitely doable in a 10-5 day. I had a nearly identical intinerary planned a few months ago but ditched the Camden Yard part as the offerings were overpriced and just not very interesting. (maybe books are better?) Substituted a supertapas lunch on Upper St. and a visit to the Crafts Council Gallery.

I think the Geffrye is a little gem often overlook because of its location away from more central sites.

I also really like the Whitechapel Gallery which has an E1 adderess.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 10:07 PM
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As Janis says, it's very doable. I would visit Camden Passage if I were you, and also lunch there as obxgirl says. Glad you're visiting the Geffrye. I have visited it many times as I grew up in this area. To get to Camden Passage, get off the tube at Angel, which is on the Northern Line (as is Old Street). You may find this link useful for planning your walk.

http://www.streetmap.co.uk
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 10:08 PM
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From Hoxton to Camden Passage, you're a great deal better off walking through the back streets (a copy of the A-Z is essential for this) to the NE of City Road, rather than walking along the noisy and ugly main drag. The wonderful mix of tatty back-offices, media centres, and stunningly pretty early Victorian workers' cottages.

While you're in the area, it's not my cup of Espresso, but you might be interested in the Estorick Gallery, which claims to be in posh Canonbury Square but is actually in infinitely less prestgious Canonbury Road. It's one of the world's major locations for early 20th century Italian stuff - futurism and all that (rather less significant than being the world's major soup label collection in my view, but de gustis and all that)

Alternatively, it's worth getting a copy of Time Out and checking what's on at the galleries east of Hoxton (they have a separate East End section in their Art bit). Quality highly variable, but there are a lot of shows on round the area, and the Whitechapel is usually worth spending time in.
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Old Sep 26th, 2005, 11:53 PM
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If you want to look at serious modern art then you can't beat the galleries in Cork St., W1 or Haunch of Venison (in Haunch Of Venison Yard, W1). Hoxton is full of overpriced art that really isn't worth buying. It isn't going to ever appreciate in value, certainly not noticeably.

I don't like Hirst, but if you can buy his work, it's going to go up and up, and when he dies, then you hit the jackpot. It's only worth buying big names for lots of money. You could spend 10kGBP in Hoxton on something you'd be lucky to sell the next day for 1kGBP.

As for Camden Passage, they have the biggest load of tat. The antiques are more bric-a-brac than antiques. That is fine, but it's not cheap there. The whole Islington/Shoreditch/Hoxton triangle (I believe that's the term for it) is so very overrated. It's an area full of council estates that happened to be near The City so The City workers move there and try to make it "smart". Still a dump in my eyes.
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Old Sep 27th, 2005, 08:34 AM
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Rubbish, mk2. White Cube is owned by Jay Jopling who is generally recognised as the top contemporary art dealer in Britain. "You could spend 10kGBP in Hoxton on something you'd be lucky to sell the next day for 1kGBP." - you mean like, say, an Antony Gormley piece ?

In any case, most of us don't buy art to make money : we buy it (or just go to see it) because we like it.

For working out your timings, though, budzilla, be aware that White Cube shouldn't take long - it's only 2 smallish rooms.
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Old Sep 27th, 2005, 09:38 AM
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One wastes money on art if they aren't buying quality pieces.

All the big art sales where paintings go for tens of millions are purely about money, not simply thinking "it'll look pretty", many of these paintings won't see the light of day again if they land in a private collectors place. I suppose perhaps the like the sound of it, the look, but it is about money.

People paint for love, and also for money. Look at Warhol for instance.
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