Mass - non catholic...

Old Nov 6th, 2000, 03:00 AM
  #1  
noncatholic
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Mass - non catholic...

Just wondering... <BR> <BR>I'm not Catholic (or Christian for that matter)...so if I want to go to see a Mass, what do I do? Do they do Catholic identity card checks (hehe)? Seriously though, I have no idea what to do.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 03:50 AM
  #2  
karen
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Find out what time Mass starts, arrive on time, walk in, find a seat anywhere, and look and listen. Stand when the rest of the congregation stands. Kneeling is optional (you can sit during those parts instead). Non-Catholics (even baptized Christians of other faiths) are NOT welcome to take Communion, so definitely sit that part out. You won't be the only one. Get up and leave when everybody else does. In an old-fashioned Catholic church, no one will speak to you. New-style modern ones in the U.S. may have a greeter. Just tell them you're visiting.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 05:43 AM
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elvira
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Eventhough a Prod, I've spent as much time at Catholic services as my own. As you go in, there's a font with holy water. Catholics dip their fingers and then cross themselves; you don't have to. They also genuflect (kneel) as they enter the aisle and pew; you don't have to. As karen said, just follow along with the standing/kneeling/ sitting. You don't have to participate in the recitations or responses if you don't want, nor say the prayers (you can say your own to yourself if you'd like). As karen said, people will get up to go to Communion; don't feel uncomfortable remaining in the pew - other people will be doing the same. At the end of the service, there is usually the "kiss of peace" - everyone turns to their neighbors on each side, and in front and back, and either kiss the cheek or shake hands. It's a nice way to be part of the 'community' and finish the service. <BR> <BR>No one asks to see your crucifix or recite the Rosary at the door; I've always felt welcome in a Catholic church.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 05:51 AM
  #4  
sandi
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I agree w/ Elvira. I've always felt welcome. I love to listen and participate as much as possible. Don't worry about not know what to say or do, there will be many others doing the same.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 10:21 AM
  #5  
Janice
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The very fact that you thought to ask this questions suggests to me that you'll be just fine - anybody who has that much respect and desire to do the right thing will be welcomed. You are probably a great traveller and a credit to your religion, country, and parents.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 11:36 AM
  #6  
jwagner
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noncatholic: <BR> <BR>The Catholic Church opens its arms to everyone. You will feel welcome if you follow the above advice. Even if you screw up and accidently break a rule no one will notice or make a big deal about it.
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 07:01 PM
  #7  
hmh
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Even Catholics find it interesting to go to Mass in foreign countries. We have been fortunate to attend Mass in France, Holland, Germany, Mexico where, to us, the language was strange but the form of the Mass itself is the same. But we find that there are some variations( especially in standing and kneeling) and even we "screw up". It is so nice to exchange the "Sign of Peace" and hear the greeting in a foreign language. We have been on tours where others, who were not Catholic, went with us to Mass, just to have the opportunity to experience the service. Go for It!!
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 07:24 PM
  #8  
Cat
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You'll feel less conspicious if you stand when everyone stands and kneels when everyone kneels, etc. But as several have mentioned. When it is time to go to communion,just stay seated. I don't know if they still do it, but the <BR>church use to print a (um not sure what you call it?) 'book' that would tell you <BR>what the service was going to be focused on. It usually has "stand" and "kneel" out to the side. Course don't know if the Irish church's do this and it has been a rather long time since I've been to mass, but trust me if you just stand, sit and kneel when everyone else does - you'll blend in with no problem!
 
Old Nov 6th, 2000, 11:57 PM
  #9  
noncatholic
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Thanks for the advice, everyone <BR> <BR>By the way, are services still done in Latin?
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 05:11 AM
  #10  
elvira
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The only time I've attended a Latin Mass in recent years was in Malta. Have not been to mass at Notre Dame in Paris, but the smaller churches conduct the mass in French. Don't know about Ireland or Italy (small church in Venice was conducting mass in Italian, but don't know about St Mark's or the like).
 
Old Nov 7th, 2000, 06:54 AM
  #11  
karen
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The Basilica of Santa Sabina, on the Aventine Hill in Rome, used to have Mass not only in Latin, but in Gregorian chant. I don't know how you check on that. Even if you don't get there for Mass, it's a beautiful old church with probably the best view in Rome right next door in the Orange Garden.
 
Old Nov 8th, 2000, 02:10 PM
  #12  
Jen Moffitt
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When you are in the neighborhood, look for a sign that posts something along the lines of 'high mass.' This is a mass with the text in latin and the full gregorian chant for the Kyrie, etc. I cannot speak for europe, but I know that to do one in the states requires special permission from the local bishop. Generally neighborhoos churches will have several masses in the local lingo, and maybe one in latin. Good luck...
 

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